RESEARCH IN ENVIRONMENT AND LIFE SCIENCES

Volume-8, Number-2 (supplement), May-2015

 

73

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 261-264 (2015)

 

Response of INM on economics of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.)

Yamuna Prasad Singh*, B.N Singh and Gulab Chand Yadav

Department of Vegetable Science, N.D.U. A.& T., Faizabad - 224 229, India

*e-mail: yamunasingh1947@gmail.com

(Received: November 09, 2014; Revised received: March 15, 2015;Accepted: March 16, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present experiment was carried out with cabbage var. Sri Ganesh Gol (F1 hybrid) in randomized block design with three replications. The experiment comprised of nine different treatment combinations of five different sources of nutrients including organic, inorganic and biofertilizers alone in combinations were applied following the proper procedure as per the treatments. The experimental findings revealed that the treatment T8 (Half dose of NPK ha-1 + Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Phosphorus Solubilizing Mycorrhiza @ 5 kg ha-1) showed better response to plant growth and its attributes and quality. However, maximum yield 447.16 q/ha were obtained with the application of half dose of NPK ha-1 + Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Phosphorus Solubilizing Mycorrhiza @ 5 kg ha-1 followed by T9 (half dose of NPK ha-1 + Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Azospirillum @ 5 kg ha-1+ Phosphorus Solubilizing Mycorrhiza @ 5 kg ha-1). On the basis of economic analysis, maximum cost: benefit ratio (1: 3.59) was recorded with the application of half dose of NPK ha-1 + Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Phosphorus Solubilizing Mycorrhiza @ 5 kg ha-1 (T8) during 2010-11 and this treatment combination was found most beneficial and feasible for cultivation of cabbage.

Key words: INM, Bio-fertilizers, Cabbage, Yield, Economics

74

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 265-267 (2015)

 

Integration of chemical and cultural methods for weed management in summer groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

R.N. Daki, Satyakumari Sharma*, M.K.Sondarva, A.D. Vaja and B.K.Sagarka

Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, J.A.U., Junagadh-(Gujarat), India

*e-mail: satya.sharma77@yahoo.com

(Received: December 30, 2014; Revised received: March 28, 2015;Accepted: March 29, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during summer season of 2011-12 on clayey soil at Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh (Gujarat) to study effect of various pre and post-emergence herbicides, alone or integrated with hand weeding and interculturing, on weeds pressure and productivity in summer groundnut. Results revealed that application of pendimethalin @ 0.900 kg ha-1 as pre-emergence with hand weeding (20 days after sowing) & interculturing (40 days after sowing) recorded significantly higher growth and yield attributes, yield and quality parameters over unweeded control, which remained statistically at par with application of oxyfluorfen @ 0.240 kg ha-1 PE + hand weeding (20 days after sowing) & interculturing (40 days after sowing).

 

Key words: Groundnut, Herbicide, Imazethapyr, Oxyfluorfen and Weed management

 

75

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 268-270 (2015)

 

Effect of nutrient uptake by irrigation, nitrogen and phosphorus levels in pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br. emend. Stuntz]

H.M. Bhuva, Satyakumari Sharma*, J.A. Chudasama and R.N. Daki

Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, G.A.U., Junagadh-(Gujarat), India

*e-mail: satya.sharma77@yahoo.com

(Received: December 30, 2014; Revised received: March 28, 2015;Accepted: March 29, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted in split plot design keeping four levels of irrigation in main plot and six treatment combinations comprising of three levels of nitrogen and two levels of phosphorus, in sub plot with four replications during rabi seasons on clayey soil at Gujarat Agricultural University, Junagadh Campus, Junagadh (Gujarat) to study effect of various level of irrigation, nitrogen and phosphorus on nutrients content and uptake of pearl millet. The result revealed that application of IW/CPE of 0.7 recorded significantly higher yields viz., grain and stover yield and soil moisture parameters viz., consumption use of water, water use efficiency was at par with application of IW/CPE ratios of 0.9.

Key words: Pennisetum glaucum, Irrigation, Water use efficiency, Moisture and Nutrient

76

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 271-274 (2015)

 

Vegetative growth performance of medicinal plants under osmotic and salinity stress

V.S. Mitharwal, Karan Singh, Satyakumari Sharma* and T.C. Poonia

Department of Plant Physiology, College of Agriculture, SKN, Jobner-303329, India

*e-mail: satya.sharma77@yahoo.com

(Received: January 30, 2015; Revised received: April 22, 2015;Accepted: April 24, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted to study the effect of vegetative growth performance of medicinalplant species namely Cassia angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Solanum xanthocarpum and Tribulus terrestris under osmotic and salinity stress mitigating through plant growth regulators. The adverse effects of osmotic stress could be mitigated by physiologically active concentrations of synthetic indole butyric acid (IBA), benzyl adenine (BA) and cycocel (CCC). IBA proved most effective in osmotic stress could be mitigated by physiologically active concentrations. However, the adverse effect of salinity stress was also reduced by synthetic plant growth regulators (PGRs) namely IBA, Ba and CCC under laboratory condition with respect to seed germination and seedling growth parameters. Cycocel proved most effective under seed germination and seedling growth parameters.

Key words: Cycocel, Cassia angustifolia, Indole butyric acid, Benzyl adenine and Stress

77

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 275-277 (2015)

 

Growth and yield of late sown wheat as influenced by

irrigation schedules and integrated nutrient management

Ripudaman Singh*1, Hemant Kumar1, Shweta2 and Awadhesh Kumar3

1Department of Agronomy, 2Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, 3Department of Soil Science and Water Conservation,

C.S. Azad University of Agriculture andTechnology, Kanpur,India

*e-mail: rsycsa@gmail.com

(Received: October 01, 2014; Revised received: March 27, 2015;Accepted: March 29, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conductedon sandy loam soil of slightly alkaline in nature (pH 8.0). the treatments consisted 4-irrigation schedules (irrigation at CRI + grain filling, at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence stages at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence + grain filling stages and at CRI + tillering + panicle + dought stages and 3 fertility levels of RDF; 75% RDF + vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Azotobacter and 75% RDF + vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Azotobacter + PSB) applied in late sown wheat crop. The results revealed that four irrigations applied at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence + grain filling stages registered significantly highest values of different growth and yield attributes and yielded highest of 25.23 qha-1 and -35.93 q ha-1 straw yield against lowest of 20.95 q ha-1 grain and 32.39 q ha-1 straw yield with 2 irrigations at CRI + grain filling stages. Among fertility treatments, 75% RDF + vermicompost + Azotobacter + PSB produced highest of 23.59 qha-1 grain yield and 35.68 q ha-1, straw yield with highest values of growth and yield attributes. The treatment of RDF only produced lowest of 22.08 q ha-1 grain and 32.63 q ha-1 straw with lower values of growth and yield attributes. The effect of irrigation x fertilizer interaction was not found significant in any case.

Key words: Late sown wheat, Irrigation, fertility, Yield attributes, Yield

78

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 278-280 (2015)

 

Moisture use, productivity and economics of late sown wheat (triticum aestivum) under limited moisture regimes and integrated nutrient management

Ripudaman Singh*1, Hemant Kumar1, Sanjiv Kumar1 and Shweta2

1Dept. of Agronomy, 2Dept. of Genetics and Plant Breeding, C.S. Azad University of Agriculture andTechnology, Kanpur,India

*e-mail: rsycsa@gmail.com

(Received: October 01, 2014; Revised received: March 27, 2015;Accepted: March 29, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted during rabi 2011-12 at C.S. Azad university of Agric. & Tech., Kanpur on late sown wheat. The 12 treatment combinations of 4 irrigation levels (2 irrigation of CRI + grain filling; 3 irrigation at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence; 4 irritation at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence + grain filling) and 4 irrigation at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence + dough stage and three fertility levels (RDF i.e. 80:60:40 kg/ha NPK); 75% RDF + vermicompost 2.5 t/ha + Azotobacter; 75% RDF + vermicompost + Azotobacter + PSB) were tried in factorial R.B.D.. the results revealed that 4 irrigations at CRI + tillering + panicle emergence + grain filling stages registered highest values of total water use (271.04 mm), grain yield (25.23 q/ha), straw yield (35.93 q/ha), gross income (rs. 57664/ha) and net return (rs. 31744/ha). However, WUE was recorded highest of 13.96 kg grain/ha mm with 2 irrigations at CRI + grain filling stages which registered significantly lowest economic parameters. As regards fertility levels, integration of vermicompost + biofertilizer with 75% RDF increased total water use, WUE, grain and straw yield, gross income, net return and B:C ratio significantly over 100% RDF application. Interaction effect of irrigation x fertility was not found significant in any crop character studied.

Key words: Late sown wheat, Irrigation, Nutrients, Biofertilizer, Water use, Yield, Economics

79

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 281-286 (2015)

 

Cultural and pathogenic variability in Alternaria brassicae isolates of Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss] collected from different agro-climatic regions of India

Mahesh Singh*, H. K. Singh, R. B. Singh, Shiwangi and Abhishek

Department of Plant Pathology, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad, (U.P.), India

*e-mail: msmaurya96@gmail.com

(Received: September 13, 2014; Revised received: April 17, 2015;Accepted: April 18, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Alternaria blight (Alternaria brassicae) causes severe damage to Indian mustard in the country. Affected leaf samples were collected from ten different places for the isolation and purification of pathogen to study the cultural and pathogenic variations.The fungal colonies of A. brassicae varied in their cultural behaviour ranging from fluffy to compressed, with wavy, smooth to rough margins. Colonies colour varied from black, brown, light brown to dark brown and growth varied from slow, medium to fast on different culture media. Variation in zonation and sporulation on different medium were also observed in the isolates under study. Among the media in general, the fastest growth of each fungal isolates were recorded on PDA as compare to others; while slowest growth was recorded on Czapek-dox agar medium. On mean basis the maximum mycelia growth (83.77 mm) and dry weight of fungal (354.34 mg) was recorded on PDA while, minimum mycelial growth as well as dry weight (79.54 mm and 322.5 mg) was recorded on Czapek-dox agar medium respectively. Among the isolates, isolate Ab3 of Uttrakhand was noted fast growing with maximum mycelial growth of 90.0 mm and dry weight of 449.0 mg followed by isolate Ab7 of Haryana (89.13 mm and 440.6 mg) and Ab6 of West Bengal (88.37 mm and 426.0 mg) but, all were at par statistically and grouped together.Similar pattern was recorded on other medium also. On the basis of growth and dry weight of fungus the isolates were grouped into three categories. Category one have isolates Ab3, Ab6 and Ab7, category two have Ab1, Ab5 and Ab8, while category three have Ab2, Ab4, Ab9 and Ab10. All the isolates were found pathogenic in nature on different Brassica spp. Maximum percent disease intensity (PDI) of each isolate was recorded on B. juncea (56.70) followed by B. campestris var. yellow sarson (51.69) and was B. nigra (49.34), while it was recorded minimum in B. carinata (17.21). On the basis of pathogenic variability, the isolates were grouped same as in case of cultural variation. Hence, it can be suspected that the isolates obtained from different agro-climatic region may be grouped into three categories, which indicates the prevalence of three different strains/races in the different part of country under study.

Key words: Alternaria brassicae, Brassica juncea, Cultural, Pathogenic, Variability

80

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 287-288 (2015)

 

Studies on the effect of organic seed treatment on old seeds of maize

Shankrayya1, N. M. Shakuntala1*, S. N. Vasudevan1, M.B. Tejagouda2and Shivagouda Patil3

Department of Seed Science & Technology, 1UAS, Raichur, 2UAS Dharwad-580 005, 3STR, NSP, UAS, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065, India

*e-mail: shakuntalanm@yahoo.co.in

(Received: December 23, 2014; Revised received: April 22, 2015;Accepted: April 24, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The laboratory experiments were conducted in the Department of Seed Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur to find out the effect of organic seed treatments on seed quality of old seeds of Maize. All the quality parameters showed significant differences due to seed treatment with organics. The results revealed that seed treatment with vermiwash @ 2 per cent recorded significantly higher germination percentage (87.67%), root length (14.76 cm), shoot length (9.23 cm), seedling length (23.43 cm), seedling vigour index-I (2037), seedling vigour index-II (28.78), seedling dry weight (344.55 mg), dehydrogenase enzyme activity (0.462 OD value) and lower electrical conductivity of seed lechate (0.396 dSm-1) followed by cow urine @ 50 per cent compared control.

Key words: Maize, Organics, Old seeds, Seed quality

81

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 289-290 (2015)

 

Effect of micro-nutrients on flowering and yield attributes of African marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)

Aashish Kumar Gupta* and Ashok Kumar

Department of Floriculture & Landscape, N.D.U.A. & T, Kumarganj, Faizabad

*e-mail: ashishkgupta195@gmail.com

(Received: September 09, 2014; Revised received: April 26, 2015;Accepted: April 27, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The experiment was conducted in Randomized Block Design with ten treatments comprising of 3 levels each of ZnSO4 (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 %), CuSO4 (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 %) and FeSO4 (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 %) replicated thrice to evaluate the effect of micro-nutrients on flowering attribute and yield characters in African marigold. Among all the treatments CuSO4 (0.4 %) resulted in the early flower bud initiation, opening of first flower, maximum duration of flowering, maximum number of branch per plant and maximum number of flower per plant. The maximum plant height, spread of plant, stalk length, flower weight, yield of flower per plant and flower yield per hectare were observed with spray of ZnSO4 (0.4%).

Key words: Flower yield, Flowering characters, Marigold

82

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 291-296 (2015)

 

Effect of Fe and Mo treated green manures on

soil physico-chemical properties and rice productivity

Jitendra Singh1, Ashok Kumar1, B. P. Dhyani1, Robin Kumar1, Rajiv Kumar2 and Pawan Kumar Verma3*

1Department of Soil Science, 2Department of Agronomy, SVP Uni. of Ag. and Tech., Modipuram, Meerut-250110, India

3 Department of Agronomy, CSA Uni. of Ag. and Tech., Kanpur-208002, India

*e-mail: pawanjrf85@gmail.com

(Received: December 17, 2014; Revised received: April 20, 2015;Accepted: April 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A pot study was conducted on Rice crop with a variety of Pusa-Basmati 1 during the kharif season of 2012 and 2013 on clay loam soil at department of soil science of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut. The experiment aimed to evaluating the effect of Fe and Mo treated green manures on soil fertility and rice productivity was laid out in the RBD with 13 treatments and 3 replications. Two experiment were conducted under this study, in 1st experiment GM crops Dhaincha(Sesbenia .R) and Moong (Green gram ) were grownin potswithdifferent treatments viz;GM crop without fertilizers (T1), RDF -S (Source DAP for P) 傍2, RDF + S (Source SSP for P)- T3 , RDF -S (Source DAP for P) +PSB 傍4 , RDF + S (Source SSP for P) + PSB 傍5 , RDF -S (Source DAP for P) + Fe 傍6 , RDF + S (Source SSP for P) + Fe 傍 7 , RDF -S (Source DAP for P) + Mo 傍8 , RDF + S (Source SSP for P) + Mo傍 9 , RDF -S (Source DAP for P) + Fe+ Mo 傍10 , RDF + S (Source SSP for P) + Fe+ Mo 傍 11 , RDF -S (Source DAP for P) + Fe +Mo+PSB12 and RDF + S (Source SSP for P) + Fe +Mo+ PSB -T13to evaluate theimpactof these treatments onperformance of GM cropsand thereafter on soil properties before rice. In the 2nd experiment Pusa 烹asmati-1 rice was transplanted with RDF @ 90:40:30 NPK in each pot to study the effect of Fe and Mo treated green manure on soil fertility and rice productivity. it isalso observed that application ofFe, Mo and PSBindividually or in combination along with RDF to GM cropimproved the physical properties of soilthis may be due to improvementinOC % in soil. Cultivation of rice with RDF under different treatments in GM crop increase the plant height, No of tillers/panicle, 1000 grain weight and finally the yield of rice significantly .These treatments distinctly showed the improvements in OC %, availability of N, P and K, Fe, Mo and better soil environment at harvesting and found superior over control.

Key words: Green manure, Rice crop, Micronutrients, Growth parameters

83

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 297-300 (2015)

 

Morphological and molecular variability among Alternaria brassicicola isolates causing leaf spot of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica)

Vikas Kumar Yadav, Sanjeev Kumar*, Santosh Kumar and Pradip Kumar

Department of plant pathology, N. D. University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad, 224229

*e-mail: drsanjeev44@gmail.com

(Received: October 01, 2014; Revised received: May 12, 2015;Accepted: May 14, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Morphological and molecular characteristics of Alternaria brassicicola isolates from broccoli were studied for variability. The conidia varied in length, breadth and septation. Maximum growth recorded on Host Extract Agar followed by Potato Dextrose Agar, Richard痴 Agar and Czapek痴 Agar media by CSA isolates. Molecular variability was done by protein profiling of the fungus Alternaria brassicicola through SDS-PAGE method. A standard protein marker (14.3-97 kDa) used for the determination of molecular weight of protein.High molecular weight of protein (22 kDa) recorded in the samples collected from CSA Kanpur followed by ND (21 kDa) while minimum with SHIATS samples (20 kDa).

Key words: Alternaria brassicicola, SDS-PAGE, Pathogenic variability, Broccoli

84

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 301-304 (2015)

 

Diversity and abundance of insect pollinators and impact of mode of pollination on yield parameters of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare miller) in India

Vikas Bharti1*Dilbag Singh Ahlawat2Surender Kumar Sharma1 and Naveen Vikram Singh1

1Department of Entomology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India, 2KVK, Karnal-132001, India

*e-mail: lav.bharti@gmail.com

(Received: November 17, 2014; Revised received: May 04, 2015;Accepted: May 05, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Biodiversity of pollinators on fennel cv. HF-143 (Foeniculum vulgare Miller), was studied in Hisar, Haryana, India. Twenty five insect species belonging to fifteen families of five orders were recorded from fennel cv. HF-143 flowers, in which, seven belong to order Lepidoptera, nine to Hymenoptera, five to Diptera, three to Coleoptera and one to Odonata. Among the insect pollinators, Apis florea F., A. cerana indica F., A. mellifera L. and A. dorsata F. were the most frequent pollinators. Among different bee species, the maximum mean population observed in case of Apis florea (9.23 bees/m2/5 min) followed by A. mellifera (3.62 bees/m2/5 min) and A. dorsata (3.21 bees/m2/5 min), whereas, the least abundance was observed in case of A. cerana indica, i.e., 1.82 bees/m2/5 min. Among different Apis species, A. florea spent maximum time (4.49 sec/umbelet) followed by A. mellifera (1.71 sec/umbelet) and A.cerana (1.21 sec/umbelet). The least time per umbelet was recorded in case of A. dorsata, i.e., 1.11 seconds. Among different bees, A. dorsata visited maximum number of umbelets (20.27 umbelets/min) followed by A. mellifera (14.71 umbelets/min) and A. cerana (11.99 umbelets/min). Apis florea visited least number of umbellets i.e., 7.34 umbelets/min. The yield/plant (19.40 g), yield/m2 (181.32 g), test weight (12.32 g) and per cent germination (81.20) were significantly higher in case of open pollinated flowers as compared to those where insect pollinators were excluded (14.72 g, 140.04 g, 8.52 g and 58.80%, respectively,). In case of open pollination, the per cent increase in yield/plant, yield/m2, test weight and per cent germination over without insect pollination was 31.79, 29.48, 44.60 and 38.10%, respectively. Hence, insect pollinators were essential to get good returns in this seed crop.

Key words: Abundance, Foraging speed, Foraging rate, Fennel cv. HF-143, Modes of pollination, Yield

85

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 305-308 (2015)

 

Studies on effect of integrated nutrient management on growth, yield and quality of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. capitata)

Yamuna Prasad Singh*, B.N Singh And Adesh Kumar

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224 229 India

*e-mail: yamunasingh1947@gmail.com

(Received: November 09, 2014; Revised received: May 01, 2015;Accepted: May 02, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present experiment was carried out with cabbage var. Sri Ganesh Gol (F1 hybrid) in randomized block design with three replications during 2010-11. The experiment comprised of nine different treatment combinations of five different sources of nutrients including organic, inorganic and biofertilizers alone in combinations were applied following the proper procedure as per the treatments. The maximum plant height at harvest (24.40 cm), number of non-wrapper leaves per plant (13.93), fresh weight of leaves per plant at harvest (644.00 g), stalk length (8.20 cm), diameter of stalk length (3.87 cm), maximum plant spread (52.00 cm), maximum diameter of head (23.80 cm), weight of head per plant (1207.33 g), head yield (447.16 q/ha), total solids soluble of head (8.20 0B) and ascorbic acid of head (115.47 mg/100 g) were noted by the application of half dose of NPK ha-1 + Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Phosphorus Solubilizing Mycorrhiza @ 5 kg ha-1 Therefore, the application of half dose of NPK ha-1 + Vermicompost @ 2.5 t ha-1 + Phosphorus Solubilizing Mycorrhiza @ 5 kg ha-1 could be the best treatment combination for the maximum yield in cabbage cultivation.

Key words: INM, Bio-fertilizers, Cabbage, Yield, Quality

86

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 309-312(2015)

 

Studies on genetic variability under mean, range and coefficients of variation for yield and its contributing traits in Arvi (Colocasia esculenta var. antiquorum) germplasm

 

Manish Kumar Singh*, Chandra Dev, Yamuna Prasad Singh and Praveen Singh

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224 229 India

*e-mail:manishvegnd@gmail.com

(Received: November 12, 2014; Revised received: May 05, 2015;Accepted: May 06, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Abstract: The main experiment consisting of 22 genotypes for 17 characters was laid out in randomized block design (RBD) with three replications at main experiment station of department during April, 2010 to October, 2010. The studies revealed that there was wide variability in Arvi for various characters studied. Analysis of variance for the design of experiment showed that the genotypes were highly significant for all the characters under study. The high magnitude of phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variation was observed for corm yield (g) and its contributing traits per plant. Corm yield per plant, starch content, petiole length, cormel yield per plant, sheath length, number of cormels per plant and width of lamina exhibited high value of PCV and GCV. Length of lamina had positive and highly significant correlation with width of lamina, number of corm per plant, corm yield per plant, diameter of corm, diameter of cormel and cormel yield per plant. The genotype NDC-71 produced highest yield followed by NDC-76, NDC-77, NDC-69, NDC-83 and NDC-70, NDC-71 is superior to NDC-1 for all the characters, except sheath length, diameter of plant and cormel yield per plant.

Key words: genetic variability, mean, range, coefficients of variation, yield, Arvi

87

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 313-316 (2015)

 

Genetic diversity analysis in lablab bean [Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet]

Y.V. Naghera*1,2, M.A. Vaddoria3, D. R. Mehta1 and B. Chakraborty2

1Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, College of Agriculture, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh- 362001 Gujarat

2College of Agriculture, Navsari Agricultural University, Waghai (The Dangs)- 394730 Gujarat

3Vegetable Research Station, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh- 362001 Gujarat

*e-mail: yvnaghera@gmail.com

(Received: December 13, 2014; Revised received: May 01, 2015;Accepted: May 02, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Fifty genotypes of lablab bean were used to study the genetic diversity. Observations were recorded for twelve morphological and yield attributing characters and the data were analyzed using Mahalanobis痴 D2 statistics. All the genotypes were classified into five distinct clusters, grouping together the less divergent genotypes. The genotypes exhibited sufficient variability to select genotypes for further breeding programmes. The largest cluster comprising of 34 genotypes formed by Cluster I while Cluster II and Cluster III had 6 genotypes each, followed by Cluster IV and Cluster V had three and one genotype, respectively. The maximum inter cluster distance was observed between Cluster IV and Cluster V, followed by those between Cluster II and Cluster IV. The parents for hybridization could be selected on the basis of their inter-cluster distance for isolating useful recombinants in the next generation. Seed yield per plant, pod length and number of pods per plant were found to be played an important role in divergence between populations.

Key words: Lablab bean, D2 statistics, Genetic diversity, Hybridization, Genotypes

88

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 317-318 (2015)

 

Evaluation of daisy (Aster amellus L.) cultivars for growth charecteristics in the hill zone

Ketana, G. B*1, B.S.Reddy2, Shivakumar1 and Nataraj, S.K1

1Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, College of Horticulture, Mudigere 577 132, Karnataka

2Directorate of Research, University of Agricultural and Horticultural sciences, Shimoga

*e-mail: ketana2012@gmail.com

(Received: january 02, 2015; Revised received: May 21, 2015;Accepted: May 23, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Daisy (Aster amellus L.) Commonly called as 選talian aster or 船aisy is an upcoming new potential cut flower crop. It is popular perennial-annual flower crop grown in many parts of the world for cut flowers. It belongs to family Asteraceae .Cultivar Selection-4 showed good growth and yield in the hill zone conditions compared to other genotypes. Among the growth parameters cultivars Selection-4 recorded the maximum plant height (91.93 cm), number of suckers (11.48), plant spread (51.51 cm), number of leaves (277.33), leaf area (11710.44 cm2), leaf area index (19.52) and dry matter production (101.84 g/plant).

Key words: Daisy, Growth, Cultivars, Yield

89

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 319-320(2015)

 

Evaluation of daisy (Aster amellus. L.) cultivars for flower quality and yield in the hill zone

Ketana, G. B*1, B.S.Reddy2, Shivakumar1 and Nataraj, S.K1

1Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, College of Horticulture, Mudigere 577 132, Karnataka

2Directorate of Research, University of Agricultural and Horticultural sciences, Shimoga

*e-mail:ketana2012@gmail.com

(Received: january 02, 2015; Revised received: May 21, 2015;Accepted: May 23, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An investigation on evaluation of daisy cultivars in the hill zone of Karnataka was carried out in randomized block design in the experimental block of department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Karnataka during 2013. The flower quality attribute cultivar Dharwad Local was earlier for first flowering (73.27), 50 per cent flowering (80.64) and the flower size was maximum in Selection-5 (3.30 cm), Selection-4 recorded the maximum spike length (72.43 cm) and rachis length (41.33).The number of spikes per plant was maximum in cultivar Selection-4 (8.37 spikes/plant). The spikes of the same cultivar were found to have more vase life. This is due to accumulation of more carbohydrates.

Key words: Daisy, Flower quality, Growth, Vase life

90

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 321-328(2015)

 

Floristic composition and community structure of the forest zone in Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary of district Kullu, Himachal Pradesh, India

Shalu Devi Thakur*1, K. S. Kapoor1 and S. S. Samant2

1Department of Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation, Himalayan Forest Research Institute, Panthaghati, Shimla-171009, India

2G.B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Mohal, Kullu, H.P- 175126, India

*e-mail:shalu2006@gmail.com

(Received: january 13, 2015; Revised received: May 22, 2015;Accepted: May 23, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Creation of the protected areas is of paramount importance at all levels i.e sate, national and international for formulating the biodiversity conservation strategies. These areas act as an abode for the species which are otherwise, endangered or at the brink of extinction, allowing such species to prosper in their natural ecosystems. The purpose of protected areas is to preserve the flora and fauna in their natural habitats and acts as a benchmark to study their interactions with the natural world. In the study site habitat characteristics, diversity of trees and shrubs, delineation of forest tree communities and the regeneration pattern of tree species was assessed. 64 sites were sampled between 2100- 3496 m above msl and a total of 23 forest communities were recorded from the study area out of which 16 were tree communities and 07 were shrub communities. Abies pindrow and Quercus semecarpifolia communities was the most widely distributed followed by Abies pindrow-Taxus baccata subsp. wallichiana mixed and Prunus cornuta communities. Aesculus indica-Prunus cornuta mixed community had maximum density of trees (670.00 Ind ha-1), while Abies pindrow community recorded the maximum total basal area (319.08 m2 ha-1). Minimum density and basal area was recorded for Betual utilis community (135.00 Ind ha-1; 5.60 m2 ha-1). Of the total forest tree communities, 07 communities (i.e. Abies pindrow, Acer acuminatum, Aesculus indica, Betula utilis, Picea smithiana, Prunus cornuta and Quercus semecarpifolia) showed highest regeneration of dominant species and 02 communities (i.e. Juglans regia and Juglans regia-Picea smithiana mixed) of co-dominant species indicating the possibility of partial replacement of the dominant species by the co-dominant species in the future. Long term monitoring of these tree communities for their conservation management is suggested.

Key words: Concentration of Dominance, Floristic diversity, Importance Value Index, Regeneration Pattern, Similarity Coefficient, Species Diversity

91

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 329-331(2015)

 

Response of integrated nutrient management on growth, yield and quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)

Praveen Kumar Singh*, P.K. Singh, Yamuna Prasad Singh and ManishKumar Singh

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: anshanusingh89@gmail.com

(Received: November 26, 2014; Revised received: May 12, 2015;Accepted: May 15, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present experiment was carried out with sweet potato cv. NDSP-65 in randomized block design with three replications during 2012-13. The experiment comprised of ten different treatment combinations. T1 (Recommended dose of fertilizer (NPK) @50:25:50kg/ha), T2 (RDF (NPK) + 1t/ha Neem cake), T3 (RDF (NPK) + 2t/ha Neem cake), T4 (RDF (NPK) + 3t/ha Neem cake), T5 (FYM @ 10t/ha + RDF + 1t/ha Neem cake), T6 (FYM @ 10t/ha + RDF + 2t/ha Neem cake), T7 (FYM @ 10t/ha + RDF +3t/ha Neem cake), T8(FYM @ 5t/ha + RDF + 1t/ha Neem cake), T9 (FYM @ 5t/ha + RDF + 2t/ha Neem cake) and T10 (FYM @ 5t/ha + RDF + 3t/ha Neem cake). The experimental findings evident that the use of T7 (FYM @ 10t/ha + RDF +3t/ha Neem cake) was found better with respect to promotion of growth, yield and quality parameters of sweet potato. The maximum values on growth characters were recorded by the use of FYM @ 10t/ha + RDF +3t/ha Neem cake (T7). The yield contributing characters such as length of tubers (cm), diameter of tubers, number of tuber per plant, yield per plot (kg), and yield per hectare (q) were affected by the use of different INM treatments and T7 (FYM @ 10t/ha + RDF +3t/ha Neem cake) was found to be most useful in connection with promotion of all yield attributes which recorded highest yield i.e. 261.92 q/ha. could be the best treatment combination for the maximum yield and quality in sweet potato from farmer痴 point of view.

Key words: INM, Sweet Potato, Growth, Yield, Quality

92

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 332-334 (2015)

 

Nutritional studies on bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) involving nitrogen and vermicompost

Ram Kumar, Yamuna Prasad Singh*, T. Singh and Adesh Kumar

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: yamunasingh1947@gmail.com

(Received: November 11, 2014; Revised received: May 16, 2015;Accepted: May 18, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The soil of the experimental field was sandy loam in texture havingpH.7.9i.e. twelve treatments T1 (25 kg Nitrogen ha-1), T2 (25 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 2.5 ton Vermicompost ha-1), T3 (25 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 5 ton Vermicompost ha-1), T4 (50 kg Nitrogen ha-1), T5 (50 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 2.5 ton Vermicompost ha-1), T6 (50 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 5 ton Vermicompost/ha), T7 (75 kg Nitrogen ha-1), T8 (75 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 2.5 ton Vermicompost ha-1), T9 (75 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 5 ton Vermicompost ha-1), T10 (100 kg Nitrogen ha-1), T11 (100 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 2.5 ton Vermicompost ha-1), T12 (100 kg Nitrogen ha-1 + 5 ton ha-1)were arranged in Factorial Randomized Block Design with three replication. T12 (Nitrogen 100 kg ha-1 + Vermicompost 5 ton ha-1) was found better with respect to promotion of growth, yield and quality parameters of bitter gourd. However, maximum values on growth characters were recorded by the use of Nitrogen 100 kg ha-1 + Vermicompost 5 tons ha-1. The phenological traits such as days taken to first male and female flower appeared were delayed by the use of Nitrogen 100 kg ha-1 + Vermicompost 5 tons ha-1. The yield contributing characters such as number of fruit, weight of fruit and length of fruit were affected by the use of different treatments and T12 (Nitrogen 100 kg ha-1 + Vermicompost 5 ton ha-1) was found to be most useful in connection with promotion of all yield attributes which recorded highest yield i.e. 202.51q ha-1 was found to be most remunerative treatment.

Key words: Nitrogen, Vermicompost, Bitter Gourd, Growth, Yield and Quality

93

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 335-336 (2015)

 

Effect of different sources of potassium and urea on

yield attributing characters of aonla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.)

Deepti Srivastava1*, D.K. Yadav1, Govind Vishwakarma1 and Sumit Pal2

1Department of Horticulture, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229, India

2Institute of Agriculture Science, B.H.U., Varanasi- 221 005

*e-mail: deepti.mili.srivastava@gmail.com

(Received: November 10, 2014; Revised received: May 11, 2015;Accepted: May 15, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present investigation was carried out in Randomized Block Design (R.B.D.) with eight treatments and replicated three times, considering one plant as a unit. The observations were recorded for yield attributing characters of aonla fruits. The significantly maximum fruit yield, fruit retention, fruit size, weight, volume and pulp: stone ratio and minimum fruit drop were recorded with the foliar applications of Potassium sulphate + Urea (2% each) followed by Potassium chloride + Urea (2% each) whereas the lowest result was recorded under the control (Water spray).

Key words: Potassium sulphate, Urea, Fruit retention and Yield

94

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 337-340 (2015)

 

Groundnut - wheat cropping system under different moisture management practices in hillocks watershed of bundelkhand

R.A. Singh1, Amar Singh1, I.P. Singh2 and Rajesh Rai1

1C.S. Azad university of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208002, India; 2Krishi Vigyan Kendra Parwaha,Auraiya, India

*e-mail: rasinghcsau@gmail.com

(Received: December 05, 2014; Revised received: May 02, 2015;Accepted: May 04, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The study was laidout during 2002-03 and 2003-04 at hillocks and valley eco-system of watershed, situated in catchments area of pahuj river at Jhansi. The soil of experimental site is rakar, having low fertility status. The treatments comprised of conventional system, sowing across the slope, sowing on contour alignment, sowing in submergence bunding, sowing with dead furrows, sowing with vegetative hedge of local material and sowing in nala bunding area. These treatments were applied to groundnut and wheat under groundnut-wheat cropping system. The highest pod yield of groundnut by 3010 kg ha-1 was harvested from sowing in nala bunding area of watershed. The sowing of wheat after groundnut in nala bunding area also gave highest grain yield of 4730 kg ha-1. the growth and yield traits of both the crops were concordant to yields obtained from groundnut-wheat cropping system. The lowest pod yield of groundnut 2715 kg ha-1 and grain yield of wheat 4238 kg ha-1 were harvested under conventional system. The yield of groundnut and wheat, sowing in nala bunding area increased by a margin of 295 kg ha-1 or 10.85% and 492 kg ha-1 or 11.60 %, respectively, over conventional system. The maximum production efficiency value 58.71 kg ha-1 day-1 was noted in groundnut-wheat cropping system, sown in nala bunding area. Similarly, the highest water use efficiency was recorded in groundnut and wheat crops by 10.37 kg ha-1 mm-1 and 22.00 kg ha-1 mm-1, respectively, which were sown in nala bunding area under groundnut-wheat cropping system.

Key words: contour alignment, cropping system, production efficiency, Rakar soil, water use efficiency, watershed technology

95

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 341-342(2015)

 

Nutritional and antinutritional evaluation of sawan millet (Echinochloa frumentecea)

Ashish Kumar Yadav* and R.N. Kewat

Department of Biochemistry. N. D. University of Agric. and Tech. Kumarganj, Faizabad, 224229, India

*e-mail: yadav.ashish722@gmail.com

(Received: December 17, 2014; Revised received: May 06, 2015;Accepted: May 08, 2015)

 

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Abstract: For the present investigation ten germplasms of sawan millet are collected from Devipatan mandal of Eastern U.P. and was replicated three times in Randomized Block Design (R.B.D.). After harvesting of the sawan millets, various nutritional and antinutritional parameters such as protein, crude fibre, tryptophan, lysine, metheonine and tannin content had been analysed. Maximum protein content (9.33%) was reported in the germplasm NDS-5. Highest crude fibre content (6.90%) and tryptophan content (39.3mg/g) was reported in germplasm NDS-9 and NDS-2 respectively. Lysine and metheonine content (85.33 and 107.33mg/g) was found maximum in NDS-10 and NDS-1. The maximum antrinutritonal factor tannin content (59.85mg/100g) was found maximum in germplasm NDS-6. The above analysis revealed that sawan millets grown in Devipatan mandal have excellent nutritional value and less antinutritional factor.

Key words: Sawan, protein, tryptophan, methionin, crude fibre, lysine, tannin

96

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 343-346 (2015)

 

Studies on correlation and path coefficient analysis in

sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L) Lam.) germplasm

Devesh Pratap Singh2,3*, Chandra Deo1, Amar Singh1, Deepak Kumar Gautam2and AmitKumar2

1SMS (Horticulture) K.V.K, Kannauj, 2J. C. Bakewar, Etawah (CSJMU Kanpur)

3Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: deveshpratapsingh6983@gmail.com

(Received: November 07, 2014; Revised received: April 18, 2015;Accepted: April20, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Correlation and path analysis were estimated among 33 genotypes of 13 quantitative characters in sweet potato, planted with randomized block design with three replications during October, 2013 to February, 2014.Total yield quintal per hectare was exhibited positive and highly significant correlation with girth of tuber, tuber per vine, average weight of tuber, yield per plant, while other characters showed non signified positive correlation with yield per hectare. At phenotypic levels, yield per plant (0.9805) followed by girth of tuber (0.0731), internodal length (0.0482) and length of leaves (0.0304) exerted high positive direct effect on tuber yield per hectare. The direct effects of others nine characters were too low to be consequence. However, average weight of tuber (-0.0881) followed by days to bud initiation (-0.0615), tuber per vine (-0.0408), branches per vine (-0.0192) and width of leave (-0.0171) exerted negative direct effect on tuber yield per plant. Yield per plant (0.520), average weight of tuber (0.496), tuber per vine(0.438),length of leave (0.182) and width of leave (0.182) exerted high indirect effect on tuber yield per plant.

Key words: Correlation studies, Sweet potato, Path analysis

97

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 347-350 (2015)

 

Enzymatic and physico-chemical evaluation of mango varieties during storage in cardboard carton by post harvest application of salicylic acid

Shivendra Kumar Vishwakarma*, R. P. Singh and R. N. Kewat

Department of Biochemistry, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224229, india

*e-mail: shivendrabiochem@gmail.com

(Received: December 22, 2014; Revised received: April 29, 2015;Accepted: April 30, 2015)

 

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Abstract: In the present investigation four varieties of mango namely Dashahari, Langra, Chausa and Safeda were taken at maturity and stored in cardboard carton by the application of salicylic acid at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 g/l. The analysis of specific gravity, physiological loss weight (PLW), cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, total soluble solids (TSS) and acidity had been done at the five days intervals. The data revealed that highest physiological loss weight (7.18 %) was recorded in Safeda variety at 20 days ambient storage period 1.0 g/l salicylic acid treatment. Highest specific gravity (1.28) was reported in the variety Dashahari at 15 days storage by 0.5 g/l salicylic acid treatment. Maximum cellulase and polyphenol oxidase enzyme activity (12.84 and 56.38 units/g) was reported in the variety Dashahari at five days ambient storage period by the application of 0.1 g/l acid treatment. Highest TSS content (28.00 Brix0) was recorded in the variety Chausa at 20 days ambient storage period by 0.5 g/l salicylic acid treatment. Maximum acidity content (0.36 %) was recorded in the variety Dashahari at five days storage by 0.5 g/l salicylic treatment. After the application of salicylic during storage in cardboard carton cellulose, polyphenol oxidase, physiological loss weight, acidity decreased and TSS, specific gravity increased. Salicylic acid and cardboard carton storage increased the shelf life of mango fruits by decreasing physiological loss weight.

Key words: Mango, Salicylic acid, Cardboard, Cellulose, Polyphenol oxidase, PLW, TSS, Acidity, Specific gravity

98

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 351-352 (2015)

 

Studies on physico-chemical composition of aonla fruits (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.)

Prem Kant Yadav1, Govind Vishwakarma2* and D.K. Yadav2

1Dept. of Horticulture, C.S.A.U.A. &.T.Kanpur-208 002, india; 2Dept. of Horticulture, N.D.U.A. &.T. Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229

*e-mail: govind0139@gmail.com

(Received: November 22, 2014; Revised received: April 21, 2015;Accepted: April 22, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Aonla fruits were harvested at maturity and collected in polythene bag from main experimental station, horticulture of this university for two consecutive years. One kg mature fruit of each of all cvs cultivars replicated three times were taken for assessing the physico-chemical composition. The physical composition of aonla cultivar-Krishna, and Banarasi indicated variability in pulp, seed and fiber content whereas chemical composition of aonla cultivars showed a range of variability in moisture, total soluble solids, acidity vitamin C and total phenols in both the years.

Key words: Gooseberry, Pulp, Carbohydrates, Carotene, Thiamin, Riboflavin and minerals

99

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 353-356(2015)

 

Quality characteristics and shelf life studies of potato (solanum tuberosum l.) Incorporated chakli- an indian traditional snack

Sukhpreet Kaur* and Poonam Aggarwal

Department of Food Science and Technology, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004, Punjab

*e-mail: sukhpreetnagra1@gmail.com

(Received: November 30, 2014; Revised received: April 14 2015;Accepted: April 15, 2015)

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Abstract: Potatoes of three varieties were incorporated at 45% to a traditional Indian rice based deep-fat fried snack product namely chakli to study its effect on organoleptic, physicochemical, and shelf life quality. The control products were without potato. Results indicated that protein content was significantly higher in control chaklis compared to potato supplemented chaklis. Oil uptake significantly increased on supplementation with potato. Sensory evaluation indicated higher overall acceptability scores for potato enriched chaklis compared to control chaklis. Storage studies showed marginal changes in the moisture content and rancidity parameters of the product. Potato incorporated chaklis from all the three cultivars were found to be highly desirable up to 3 months of storage.Potato consumption can be increased through the production of such low cost food products.

Key words: Potato, Cultivars, Chakli, rice, Supplementation

100

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 357-359 (2015)

 

Vermicompost technologies to prevent soil pollution and improve soil fertility

N. Kumara*, Nehal A. Farooquee, P.V.K. Sasidhar

School of Extension and Development Studies (SOEDS), IGNOU, New Delhi, India

*e-mail: nkumar278@gmail.com

(Received: December 02, 2014; Revised received: April 30 2015;Accepted: May 02, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Vermicomposting is the term given to the process of conversion of biodegradable matter by earthworms into vermicast. In the process, the nutrients contained in the organic matter are partly converted to bioavailable forms. The hormones and enzymes are believed to stimulate plant growth and discourage plant pathogens. In the present study Maximum yield (16.46 % increases in Yield) due to adoption of vermicompost technology was 17.34 tonne of matured whole Areca nut per Ha compared to 14.90 tonne in inorganic system. Adoption of vermicompost technology brought the benefit cost ratio for Areca nut farmers compared to farmers of inorganic system could get from Rs 1.77 to Rs 2.85 against the every rupee invested in third year. Vermicopost technology adoption improved the soil organic matter (1.96) at the end of third year, (1.51) in the second year, (0.92) in the first year and which was low (0.63) before the project and there by the soil quality and the sustainability index of the soil was maximum with application of vermicompostcompared to inorganic after three years of study.

Key words: Vermicompost, Organic matter, Soil quality, Sustainability index of the soil, Nutrient index, Soil productivity

101

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 360-362(2015)

 

Performance of cashew as influenced by different weather conditions under organic practices in plains of Karnataka, India

N. Kumara*

Site coordinator, AVRDC, ICRISAT Campus, Hyderabad- 502319

*e-mail: nkumar278@gmail.com

(Received: December 17, 2014; Revised received: May 08, 2015;Accepted: May 10, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A cashew, well known as climate smart crop, a study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of the organically grown crop for consistent and stabilized yield under varied weather conditions of plain track of Karnataka. The study revealed that during September to December where flushing (vegetative growth) is active, highest average temperature recorded was 29.26ーC, 27.91ーC, and 29.21ーC respectively in September to December of 2012, 2013 and 2014. Similarly, Highest average temperature recorded was 32.57ー C, 33.44ーC, and 34.90ーC respectively in January to May of 2012, 2013 and 2014 which coincides with flowering and fruiting time. There was an increase in temperature from year to year. The data revealed that in the first year (i.e. end of 2013) of study, there was no significant yield differences observed between organic and inorganic practices (20.76 & 20.20 Kg per plant respectively in organic & inorganic system) whereas, increasing yield in organic system was 21.45 Kg (4290 Kg per ha) of cashew nuts per plant compared to 20.52 Kg (4104Kg per ha) in inorganic system at the end of April 2014. There was a significant increase in yield to the tune of 5.00 per cent recorded with organic system at the end of second year of the study i.e. April 2014. Organic system significantly improved the soil quality and the sustainability index of the soil was maximum with organic practices (1.59) compared to inorganic one (0.88). The study supports the benefit of adopting organic system in enhancing and stabilizing production through increased productivity. Further, in spite of the varied weather (Temperature and rainfall) in 2012, 2013 and 2014, cashew could give consistent and stabilized yield under plain track of Karnataka, indicating its suitability as a climate smart crop.

Key words: weather, Organic Farming. Cashew nut, Yield, Soil organic Matter

102

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 363-366 (2015)

 

Raised bed furrow system as a water management approach for increased soybean productivity

K. S. Bhargav*

Rajmata Vijayaraje Scindia, Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, K.V.K., Dewas-455111, India

*e-mail: ksbhargav@rediffmail.com

(Received: November 17, 2014; Revised received: April19, 2015;Accepted: April 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted on 10 farmer痴 fields of three villages such as Bhadoni, Patlawada and Mandalkhan of Shajapur District, Madhya Pradesh to study the sowing technique (i.e raised bed furrow system) of soybean to mitigate the climate change scenario and boost up the productivity of crop.In the prevalent tradition system (Flat method of sowing), seeds are placed under the soil which requires more energy to break soil crust at the time of germination hence causes poor germination. Under the mechanization sowing through raised bed furrow System, the seed is placed on the bed as a paired row and make a one deep furrow after each bed. By using this technique, row to row distance 30 cm and furrow to furrow distance 60 cm were maintained. These furrows served as a moisture retainer at the time of moisture stress condition during low rainfall and saved crops by moving moisture due to surface tension in upwards portion. During heavy rains the one end, slopping downward, was opened to drain water from the field. Soil moisture content was estimated at various depths viz. 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50cm, at 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after sowing. The soil moisture was recorded 22% under raised bed furrow system at the depth of 30-40 cm on flowering stage as compared to prevalent traditional method of sowing was 16% only. Likewise it was also observed that the other parameters i.e. No of pods and yield were significantly higher than the farmers techniques, hence the soybean productivity increased 26.9%. So it may be proved that this method may be better sowing techniques to augment the soybean production in the State as well as in India.

Key words: Raised bed furrow, Water management, Moisture conservation, Soybean

103

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 367-370 (2015)

 

Influence of polymer coating, biocides and packaging materials on storability of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) seed

Sarvjeet*1, Prashant Kumar Rai1, Arbind Kumar1, Chandan Kumar Singh2, Ajeet Yadav1

1Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, 2Department of Plant Pathology,

Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences,Allahabad- 211007, India

*e-mail: sarvjeetseed@gmail.com

(Received: August 14, 2014; Revised received: March02, 2015;Accepted: March 05, 2015)

 

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Abstract:The seed lot of chickpea was treated with polymer (4 ml/kg seed) second lot treated with polymer (6 ml/kg seed), third seed lot treated with the Neem oil @ 8 ml/kg seed, fourth seed lottreated with Pepper fruit powder @10 gm/kg seed and fifth seed lot is control. Afterthe treatment, the seed samples were stored in different types of packaging materials viz. polythene bags (non vacuum packaging), polythene bag (vacuum packaging), cloth bags, jute bag, jute + polythene bag (non vacuum packaging ) and kept at room temperature for a period 2, 4 and 6monthswith 10 % seed moisture content. At the end of the experiment after 6 months of storage period under ambient condition, treatment of polymer (6 ml/kg seed) was proved to be superior as it enhanced the seedling characters i.e. germination percentage, root length, shoot length, seedling length, and seedling vigour index, fresh weight and dry weight of seedling, seed viability, seed vigour and germination rate. Inthe packaging materials, seedling parameters were also found superior in plastic bags (vacuum packaging) as compared to plastic bags (non vacuum packaging ),Jute bag, cloth bag ,Jute + plastic bag Germination and vigour percentage decreased with the period of storage.

Key words: Chickpea, Polymer, Biocide, Seedling Characters, Packaging Materials

104

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 371-372(2015)

 

Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on

yield attributes and yield of scented Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

Rajeev Kumar1, R.S.Kureel1, Pawan Kumar Verma2, Prakash Yadav3, and Sandeep Kumar Yadav1

1Department of agronomy, N D U A & T, Faizabad-224 229, India,

2Department of agronomy, (SOA), Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar-144411, 3Department of agronomy, CSAUA & T, Kanpur, India

*e-mail: rajivnduat5@gmail.com

(Received: December 03, 2014; Revised received: April08, 2015;Accepted: April 09, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The experimental site falls under subtropical sub humid zone in Indo-gangatic plains having alluvial calcareous soil. The composite soil sample was taken from different depths (up to 60 cm) and places with the help of soil augur and analysed for its physical and chemical characteristics. The scientific name of this variety is IFT-10364. Its height is 85-95 cm, matures in 135 days and average yield is 45 q ha-1. Transplanting of rice seedling in experimental field was done manually by using 25 days old seedlings. Two to three seedling hill-1 were transplanted at about 3 cm depth at a spacing of 20 ラ 10 cm. All the growth and yield attributes increased significantly with increase in nitrogen level up to 80 kg N ha-1 though the highest value was recorded with 120 kg N ha-1. The highest grain yield of 27.62 q ha-1 was recorded with120 kg N ha-1 which was at par with 80 kg N ha-1 and significantlybetter over control and 40 kg N ha-1 showing an increase of 0.38 , 3.88 and 7.25 q ha-1 over 80, 40, 0 kg N ha-1, respectively. Application of phosphorus resulted increase in all the growth and yield attributes significantly with increase in dose of phosphorus up to 40 kg P2O5 ha-1 only. The maximum grain yield of 28.78 q ha-1 was recorded with application of 40 kg P2O5 showing an increase of23.46 and47.58 per cent over, 20 kg P2O5 ha-1 and control respectively.

Key words: Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Scented rice

105

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 373-374 (2015)

 

Prediction of drought tolerance introgression lines by

using microsatellite (SSR) marker in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

Sunil Kumar*1,2, Reeshu Singh2, D K Dwivedi1 and Amar Singh3

1 Deptt. of Plant Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering, NDUAT, Faizabad-224 229, India

2NBAIM, Mau, 3SMS-KVK, Kannauj-CSAUAT, Kanpur- 208 002, India

*e-mail: sunily086@gmail.com

(Received: September 09, 2014; Revised received: April02, 2015;Accepted: April 04, 2015)

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Abstract: Drought has been the single largest factor limiting the rice yield in rainfed areas. Developing rice cultivars with drought tolerance is the most efficient way to solve this problem. Because of physiological and genetic complexity, drought tolerance is probably the most difficult trait in rice to improve through conventional breeding. Application of molecular techniques along with conventional approach is the only option for improvement of drought tolerance. During the present investigation 27 introgression lines developed in the genetic background of IR-64 at IRRI, Philippines, along with five checks IR-64, Sarjoo-52, Nagina 22, Narendra 97 and Swarna were evaluated under drought and irrigated conditions. For identification and validation of QTLs associated with drought, the introgression lines were scan with microsatellite markers and phenotypicobservation were recorded on seedling vigor, leaf rolling, days to 50% flowering, plant height, panicles bearing tillers per plant, Spikelets per panicle, grains per panicle, spikelet fertility (%), test weight (g), biological yield (g), grain yield (g) and harvest index (%).Experimental results revealed that analysis of variance for the design of experiment indicated highly significant differences among treatments for all the characters. Four SSR primers were used for screening purpose but out these, three primers exhibited polymorphism and validated its association with drought QTLs.

Key words: Microsatellite, Drought, Introgression line, Oryza sativa

106

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 375-376 (2015)

 

Variability analysis for yield and yieldattributes of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.)

DeveshPratap Singh2, Chandra Deo1, C.N.Ram1,Amar Singh1 and Deepak Kumar Gautam2

1SMS ( Horticulture) K.V.K Kannauj ; 2Department of Vegetable Science, NDUAT, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: deveshpratapsingh6983@gmail.com

(Received: September 26, 2014; Revised received: April25, 2015;Accepted: April 27, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present investigation was carried out during October, 2013 to February 2014. Experimental material for the study consisted of 33 genotypes including two checks (NDSP-10, NDSP-65). Observations were recorded on thirteen quantitative characters viz., days to initiation of bud, length of leaves (cm), width of leaves (cm),length of vine (cm), number of branches per plant, number of leaves per vine, internodal length (cm),length of tubers (cm), girth of tubers (cm), number of tubers per vine, average weight of tuber (g),yield per plant (g), tuber yield (Q/ha).The mean squares due to treatments were highly significant for all the characters except number of tuber per vine showed significant under study. The high magnitude of phenotypic coefficient of variation was observed for leave per vine followed by length of vine, internodal length, branches per vine, tuber per vine phenotypic coefficient variation was exhibited higher than genotypic coefficient. Length of vine, internodal length, branches per vine, average weight of tuber, width of leaves exhibited high value of heritability coupled with high genetic advance.

Key words: Sweet potato, GCV, PCV, Heritability, Genetic advance

107

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 377-380 (2015)

 

Effect of exchangeable sodium on plant nutrient status and metabolic changes in Ziziphus mauritiana cultivar

Chandra Shekhar*, Neerja Singh, O.P. Singh, M. M. Sharma and Yamuna Prasad Singh

Department of Horticulture, College of Horticulture and Forestry, NDUA&T, Faizabad-224229, India

*e-mail: shekharhort@gmail.com

(Received: December 08, 2014; Revised received: April22, 2015;Accepted: April 23, 2015)

 

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Abstract:A pot trial was laid to evaluate the performance of seven Z. mauritiana cultivars viz., Banarsi Karaka, Narendra Ber Sel.-1, Narendra Ber Sel.-2 Narendra Ber Sel.-3, Ponda, and Mundia Murahara against different levels of sodicity viz., normal, 15, 30, 45 and 60 ESP.Plant nutrient status and metabolic changes in plants at various treatment combinations were recorded and statistically analyzed. Cultivar Ponda, Banarsi Karaka and Narendra Ber Sel.-1 recorded higher nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium content at higher sodicity, while, increased level of sodicity decreased status of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium. Sodium contents in leaves were decreased by increased level of sodicity. Chlorophyll contents were decreased by higher sodicity and total free amino acids content was increased by higher levels of sodicity.

Key words: Sodicity, Plant nutrient status, Exchangeable sodium

108

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 381-386 (2015)

 

Characterization and classification of soil of national seed project farm of Narandra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad, India

Govind Singh* and T. P. S. Katiyar

Department of Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry, N.D. University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad-224229, India

*e-mail: sgovind1087@gmail.com

(Received: December 02, 2014; Revised received: May 02, 2015;Accepted: May 05, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Ten typical pedons in national seed project farm soils of Amaniganj block, of Milkipur taluk, Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh were studied for their morphological characteristics and physico-chemical properties and suitability for locality preferred crops.The soils were deep to very deep in depth brown to dark yellowish brown (10YR 7.5YR), excessive to moderate drained, slightly alkline to strongly alkaline (7.25 9.84), medium in CEC (16.10-25.30 [cmol(p+)/kg]), medium to high base saturation and clay loam to silty loam with variations in relation to physiography. The pedons 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9 of exhibit the development of Argilic horizon. The pedons on1, 2, 9and 10 have Natric horizon, classified as Alfisols. At family level, pedons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, classified as fine mixed, hyperthermic, Typic Argiustalfs, pedon 1, 2, 9 and 10 fine-mixed, hyperthermic, Typic Natraustalfs, respectively.

Key words: National seed project farms, Soil classification, Exchangeable cations

109

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 387-388 (2015)

 

Performances of fertilizers and foliar nutrition levels

on yield of Greengram (Vigna radiata L.)

Sunil Kumar*1, S.K. Patel1 and Gautam Ghosh2

1Department of Agronomy, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology & Sciences, Allahabad-211007, India

2Deptt. of Agronomy and Dean, Alld. School of Agriculture, Allahabad-211007, India

*e-mail: sunilagro.chaudhary@gmail.com

(Received: December 07, 2014; Revised received: May 11, 2015;Accepted: May 12, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted with four levels of recommended dose of fertilizers (RDF) N&P (control, 100%, 85% and 70%) and four levels of foliar application (control, waterspray, urea 2% sprayand DAP 2% spray at 20 and 40 DAS) during Zaid season ofat Crop Research Farm, Department of Agronomy, SHIATS, Allahabad (U.P.) on Greengram (Vigna radiata L.). Significantly the higher length of pods, no. of pods per plant, no. of grain per pod, test weight, grain yield, stover yield and benefit cost ratioobserved with application of 85% recommended dose of fertilizers, DAP 2% foliar spray and combination of 85% recommended dose of fertilizers with DAP 2% foliar spray.

Key words: RDF, Foliar spray, Yield, Greengram

110

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 389-392 (2015)

 

Evaluation of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes for growth and seed yield traits

P. Sanganabasappa, R. Paramesh and Shivagouda Patil

Department of Seed Science and Technology University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK Bangalore India- 560 065a

*e-mail: patilshivagouda@gmail.com

(Received: December 14, 2014; Revised received: May 14, 2015;Accepted: May 15, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The experiment were conducted to evaluate the sixteen groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes for plant growth and seed yield components during Kharif, 2010 at AICRP on groundnut, Agriculture Research Station, Chintamani, Chikkaballapur distict, Karnataka. Significant difference were observed among different genotypes for growth parameters, such as plant height (42.93 cm), number of branches (8.93), number of leaves (95.73), plant spread (149 cm2) and number of nodules (126.0) were significantly higher in ICGV-91114, JL-24, ICGV-00350, GKVK-12 and GPBD-4 respectively.Whereas less time taken for days to 50% flowering (28 days) in GPBD-4 and yield attributing characters viz., pod yield, seed yield were significantly maximum in Chintamani-2 and ICGV-00350 (2765 kg/ha, 1925 kg/ha and 2647 kg/ha, 1797 kg/ha respectively) at harvest.

Key words: Groundnut, Genotypes, Growth, Seed yield, Characters

111

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 393-396 (2015)

 

Crop improvement in stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Beroni) through colchicine

Chavan Narendrasing Rameshsing*1, Shreeram Narasimha Hegde2, Mayur R. Wallalwar4 M. Vasundhara3

1Department of Biotechnology, 3Dept. of Horticulture, UAS, GKVK, Bangalore-560065

2Department of PSMA, College of Horticulture, Bangalore- 560065

4Department of Plant molecular biology and biotechnology, IGVK, Raipur-492012

*e-mail: narendraschavan@gmail.com

(Received: December 26, 2014; Revised received: May 15, 2015;Accepted: May 17, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A study was conducted to develop a new mutants of stevia with a higher content of Steviol Glycosides is the primary aim of plant breeders concerned with the improvement and utilization of the source of natural sweeteners. Manipulation of ploidy is a valuable tool and has been used in plant breeding programme to improve agronomic yield. Different stevia mutants were developed using Colchicine (0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.0%, 1.50%, and 2.5 %) treated plants were treated for their DNA content to ascertain the change in ploidy. The mutant plants each were tested for better growth, yield and content of active components. Ploidy level was identified by Flow cytometry analysis. The steviol glycoside content in the leaves was determined by HPLC. Analysis of variance revealed highly significant differences among the plants. However,plants showed increased plant height, leaf size, thickness, chlorophyll content, reduced internode length and two and half times the percentage of stevioside compared to control. Thus induction of tetraploidy in Stevia confirmed the effectiveness of colchicines as a polyploidizing agentcratingnew variants with higher biomass and steviol glycosides (Stevioside and Rebaudioside A) content contributing to crop improvement in Stevia.

Key words: Stevioside, Mixaploid, Colchicine

112

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(2) 397-398 (2015)

 

Response of different varieties of vegetable pea (pisum sativum) on seed production under dry eco-system

M.K. Singh2, R.A. Singh1, Khalil Khan2 and Naresh Chandra2

1C.S. Azad university of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208002, India ;2Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Rura Mallu, Jalaun, , India

*e-mail:rasinghcsau@gmail.com

(Received: December 28, 2014; Revised received: May 16, 2015;Accepted: May 17, 2015)

 

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Abstract: the study was laid out during autumn season of 2012-13 and 2013-14 at krishi Vigyan Kendra, Rura Mallu, Jalaun, C.S. Azad university of Agriculture & technology, Kanpur. three varieties i.e., AP 3, Kashi Uday and Kashi Mukti were tested under OFT programme. Variety Kashi Mukti registered highest seed yield of 15.37 q ha-1 followed by Kashi Uday (13.98 q ha-1) under dry eco-system of Bundelkhand (U.P.). The test cultivar AP 3 gave seed yield by 12.25 q ha-1, which was lowest as compared to cvs. Kashi Uday and Kashi Mukti. Cultivater Kashi Mukti gave higher yield by a margin of 1.39 q ha-1 or 9.95% and 3.12 q ha-1 or 25.45% over the Kashi Uday and AP3, respectively. The growth and yield contributing traits concordance to the seed yield of vegetable pea.

Key words: Autumn season, dry eco-system, Kawar soil, On farm trial, Post harvesttechnology

 

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