RESEARCH IN ENVIRONMENT AND LIFE SCIENCES

Volume-8, Number-4, November (Supplement)-2015

 

193

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 691-692 (2015)

 

Studies on physico-chemical characters of different genotypes of guava

Dinesh Kumar Kuldeep, B. K. Singh, Anand Kumar Singh, Anil Kumar* and Bhagat Singh

Department of Horticulture, Banaras Hindu University-221005, India

*e-mail: akkakori@gmail.com

(Received: April 09, 2015; Revised received: September 10, 2015;Accepted: September 14, 2015)

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted during 2013-2014 in completely randomized block design with 8 treatments and 5 replications . Out of all treatments highest specific gravity, TSS, high ascorbic acid content, pectin, reducing sugar and total sugar content were found in the cultivar L-49. The highest pH and maximum physiological loss of weight were found in Shweta. The highest acidity was found in banarasi surkha and minimum in cv. L-49. Physiological weight loss of guava was observed during winter season at 5 and 10 days after harvesting. The maximum physiological loss was observed in cv. Shweta and minimum in gorakh bilas pasand.

Key words: Guava, Physical and Chemical parameters

194

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 693-696 (2015)

 

Influence of nutrient management on physico-chemical properties of inceptisol under java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus)

S.P. Nandapure*1, S.G. Wankhade2, B.S. Bhople3, P.R. Dadgale4, S.S. Wanjari5 and Arun Kumar3

1NICRA, AICRP for Dryland Agriculture, 2Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, 5Agronomy, Dr. PDKV, Akola-444 104, India

3Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India; 4College of Agriculture, Latur, India

*e-mail: sachin.nandapure@gmail.com

(Received: March 14, 2015; Revised received: September 15, 2015;Accepted: September 17, 2015)

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Abstract:A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of nutrient management on physico-chemical properties of Inceptisol under Java citronella at Nagarjun Medicinal Plants Garden, Dr. P.D.K.V., Akola during kharif 2009-10 and 2010-11. The experimental soil was low in hydraulic conductivity and available water capacity. The fertility status of the soil was moderate in organic carbon, low in available N and P and very high in available K. The treatment comprised of control (no fertilizer/manure), 5 t FYM per ha, 10 t FYM per ha, 80:20:40 kg NPK per ha, 100:30:60 kg NPK per ha, 140:40:80 kg NPK per ha, 5 t FYM + 80:20:40 kg NPK per ha, 5 t FYM + 100:30:60 kg NPK per ha, 5 t FYM + 140:40:80 kg NPK per ha, 10 t FYM + 80:20:40 kg NPK per ha, 10 t FYM + 100:30:60 kg NPK per ha, 10 t FYM + 140:40:80 kg NPK per ha and 100 kg N through FYM (based on FYM analysis) were replicated thrice in randomized block design. The results from the two years of experimentation indicated that, the alone application of organic manure, NPK graded doses and combination of both (FYM + NPK) had no significant influence on physical (FC, PWP, AWC and BD) and chemical (pH, EC, organic carbon and CaCO3) properties of soil except, hydraulic conductivity. Significant improvement in hydraulic conductivity of soil was noticed with the application of 100 kg N through FYM on the basis of nitrogen analysis. Hence, it can be concluded that application of FYM alone at different levels (5, 10 t per ha and 100 kg N through FYM) and in combination with chemical fertilizer was found more beneficial way of nutrient management to improve the physico-chemical properties of Inceptisol soil under Java citronella.

Keywords: Java citronella, Nutrient management, Inceptisol, Physico-chemical properties of soil

195

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 697-700 (2015)

 

Influence of ethylene and maleic hydrazide on phenology,

morpho-phenological events and yield in cotton hybrids

D. P. Nawalkar*1, Y. G. Ban1 andV. Kumar2

1N.A.U., Navsari ; 2Main Cotton Research Station, Surat, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari - 396 450, India

*e-mail: dineshnawalkar@gmail.com

(Received: March 21, 2015; Revised received: September 18, 2015;Accepted: September 19, 2015)

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Abstract:A field experiment was conducted during two consecutive years 2011-12 and 2012-13 at Main Cotton Research Station, N.A.U., Surat to study the influence of ethylene and maleic hydrazide on phenology, morpho-phenological events and yield in cotton hybrids. The results revealed that days required for 50 per cent squaring and flowering were not influenced by Ethylene 45 ppm application at squaring stage, however, days to 50 per cent boll bursting and maturity were significantly reduced. Maleic hydrazide (MH) 500 ppm application at 85 days after sowing (DAS), contrary to ethylene increased days for 50 per cent boll bursting and maturity. Application of Ethylene required significantly less degree days (GDD) and heliothermal units (HTU) for emergence to 50 per cent boll bursting and maturity compared to other treatments and induced earliness in the crop whereas MH required significantly more degree days and heliothermal units for the same events resulting in late maturity. Application of Ethylene + MH recorded higher GDD and HTU over Ethylene and lower GDD and HTU over MH for the same events. In terms of seed cotton harvested at different interval Ethylene recorded significantly higher (109 g plant-1) yield in the first picking at 140 DAS than MH and control. Application of MH recorded higher yield at 155 and 170 DAS over Ethylene and control whereas application of both Ethylene and MH recorded significantly higher yield over all other treatments. Of the cotton hybrids studied, RCH 2 (BG-II) recorded significantly higher seed cotton yield (107 g plant-1) at 140 DAS than G. Cot Hy-12 (92.9 g) and Vikram 5 (BG-II) (90.2 g plant-1) whereas at 155 and 170 DAS, Vikram 5 (BG-II) recorded significantly higher seed cotton yield (50.7 and 34 g plant-1) than RCH 2 (BG-II) (35.9 and 26 g plant-1). Both were significantly higher than G. Cot Hy-12 in the last two picking at 155 and 170 DAS.RCH 2 (BG-II) was late than Vikram 5 (BG-II) but earliest to G. Cot Hy-12 as indicated by growing degree days and heliothermal units consumed as also by proportion of seed cotton harvested in first picked.

Key words: Ethylene, MH, Phenology, GDD, HTU, transgenic Cotton Yield

196

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 701-704 (2015)

 

Genetic divergence studies in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.)

 

Mahantesh Y Jogi,M. B. Madalageri, Poornachandragowda, G, VittalMangi and Mahadevappa Koti

Department of vegetable scienceCollege of Horticulture,Bagalkot, University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot, -587102, India

*e-mail: jogi06hort@gmail.com

(Received: March 28, 2015; Revised received: September 22, 2015;Accepted: September 24, 2015)

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Abstract:As the information, on the nature and magnitude of variability for yield and other characters present in germplasm pool owing to genetic and non-genetic causes, is an important basic pre-requisite for starting any systematic breeding programme to identify superior lines or varieties. Thus, this investigation was undertaken involving 50 genotypes of chilli (Capsicum annuumL.) with following objectives as genetic divergence studies in chilli. Genetic diversity among 50 chilli genotypes was worked out using D2 statistics. On the basis of genetic distance, these genotypes were grouped in to 6 clusters. Cluster-I was largest, consisting of 37 genotypes, while Cluster III was comprised of 9 genotypes, remaining clusters II, IV, V and VI included one genotype each. Clustering was mainly due to either geographical locations or due to genotype.Among 32 characters included for D2 analysis, Chlorophyll-b content (28.98%) contributed maximum towards expression of genetic divergence followed by chlorophyll-a (19.59%), total chlorophyll (16.24%), number of seeds per fruit (8.49%) and ascorbic acid (8.33%) content of fruits. The inter cluster distance (16.50) was highest between the clusters Vand IV. The genotypes from these clusters may be used as parental donors for future hybridization programme to develop high performing hybrids.

Keywords: Chilli, Capsicum annuumL., Genetic divergence. Clustering and genotypes

197

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 705-708 (2015)

 

Influence of diatomaceous earth on yield with its attributing characters and quality of banana in the northern zone of the Karnataka

 

Kumbargire, G. A.*, Swamy, G. S. K. and Shafeeq Bawoor

Dept. of Fruit Science,Kittur Rani Channamma College of Horticulture, Arabhavi, Gokak, Belgaum-591 218, India

*e-mail: kumbaragire0534@gmail.com

(Received: April 01, 2015; Revised received: October 02, 2015;Accepted: October 04, 2015)

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Abstract:Recent research has proved that supplementary application of silicon has positively influences on plant development improving the yield and quality of banana. To know the effect of Diatomaceous Earth used as a source of silicon field experiment was conducted on red loam soil in northern zone of the Karnataka during the year of 2014 on yield and quality of banana cv. Grand Naine. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design with nine treatment replicated three times. The experiment was comprised of 750, 500 and 250 kg/ha of Diatomaceous Earth along with package of practice. The study revealed that yield attributing characters like finger length (20.03 cm), diameter of the fingers (3.85 cm), number of hands per bunch (11.13), number of fingers per bunch (195.38) and bunch weight (26.67 kg) was maximum in the treatment T9. The days taken for ripening, (9.65), Shelf life (5.80) TSS (23.17 0B), Reducing sugars (19.16 %), Total sugars (22.88 %), Acidity (0.29 %), and Ascorbic acid content (7.21 mg/100g) was maximum in the treatment T9. With respect to whitefly and sigatoka incidence minimum per cent of incidence was found in the treatment T9.

Key words: Silicon, Yield, Whitefly, Sigatoka

 

198

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 709-716 (2015)

 

Assessment of diversity, population structure and regeneration status of tree species in Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary, District Kullu, Himachal Himalaya

 

Shalu Devi Thakur*1, K. S. Kapoor1 and S. S. Samant2

 1Department of Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation, Himalayan Forest Research Institute, Panthaghati, Shimla-171009, India

2G.B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Mohal, Kullu-175126, India

*e-mail: shalu2006@gmail.com

(Received: February 19, 2015; Revised received: October 05, 2015;Accepted: October 07, 2015)

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Abstract:The Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary located in the Kullu district of North western Himalaya and covering an area of 61 km2 has not been explored for documenting the structure and composition of vegetation. In this study we examine the site/habitat characteristics, assess the diversity of tree species, delineate forest tree communities, assess the regeneration pattern of tree species, and suggest conservation measures. Sixty-four sites were sampled between 2100-3500 m asl and for each site, habitat characteristics, altitude and dominant species were noted. Sixteen forest tree communities were recorded. Abiespindrowcommunity was the most widely distributed followed by Quercusleucotrichophora and Abiespindrow-Taxusbaccatasubsp. wallichianamixedcommunities. Abiespindrowcommunity had maximum density of trees (617.5 Ind ha-1), seedlings (492.5 Ind ha-1) and saplings (256.25 Ind ha-1), while Quercussemecarpifoliacommunity recorded the total tree density 528.75 Ind ha-1,seedlingdensity(406.25 Ind ha-1) and sapling (242.50 Ind ha-1) respectively. Of the total forest communities, 07 communities showed highest regeneration of dominant species.02 forest communities showedhighest regeneration of co-dominant species indicating the possibility of at least partial replacement of the dominant species by the co-dominant species in the future; and seven communities showed poor or no regeneration of the dominant species indicating a total replacement of the dominants in the coming years. Long term monitoring of these tree communities for their conservation management is suggested.

Key words:Conservation, Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary, Diversity, regeneration, species richness, species diversity and structural pattern.

199

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 717-720 (2015)

 

Effect of pinching and growth retardants on floweringand yield of african marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)

 

Naresh Chandra Pushkar* and A. K. Singh

 Department of Floriculture and Landscaping, College of Horticulture & Forestry, N.D.U. A.& T., Faizabad- 224229, India

*e-mail: pushkar.marigold@gmail.com

(Received: March 26, 2015; Revised received: October 05, 2015;Accepted: October 07, 2015)

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted to measure the effect of different time of pinching with different levels of growth retardants on flowering behavior and yield of African marigold. Comprising of three levels of pinching i.e. un-pinched ,pinching at 20 DAT and pinching at 30 DAT and five levels of growth retardants using, control, Cycocel 500ppm, Cycocel 1000ppm, Alar 1500ppm and Alar3000ppm, duringwinter season of 2007-08 and 2008-09. Among the pinching 20 DAT with Cycocel 1000ppm was the best for improving floral and yield parameters of African marigold. Early pinching (20DAT) with higher concentration of Cycocel (1000ppm) was suggesting for maximum stalk length (9.07and 9.28) and flowers per plant (82.13 and 85.33), fresh weight of flowers (15.43g and 15.66g) yield of flowers per plant (635.33g and 667.93g) and vase life (11.33 days and 12.46 days).

Key words: Pinching, Growth Retardants, African marigold.

200

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 721-724 (2015)

 

Screening, production and optimization of -amylase from agro-waste substrate by Bacillus licheniformis with solid state fermentation

 

Mohammad Hafeez*, Ebenezer Jeyakumar, Sandeep Singh and Harison Masih

 Department of Microbiology and Fermentaton Technology (MBFT), Jacob School of Biotechnology and Bioengineering (JSBB),

Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences (SHIATS), Naini, Allahabad-211007, India,

*e-mail: hafeezmohdmicro@gmail.com

(Received: May15, 2015; Revised received: October 08, 2015;Accepted: October 09, 2015)

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Abstract: Microbial -amylase used as extensive commercial applications in various sectors and it is highly demanded industrial enzyme. The studies were carried out with a bacterial strain producing extracellular -amylase, the effects of moisture content, initial pH, incubation period, incubation temperature, different carbon and nitrogen sources, and different substrate and phasphate concentrations of the medium were optimized.The results reveal that out of the seven substrates, and five extraction medium, sugarcane bagasse with combination of tween-80 was found to yield maximum -amylase (156.81 IU) under solid state fermentation by Bacillus licheniniformis. The amylases from the bacterium showed optimal activity at 24 h and 40 şC with moisture content 80%, inoculum size 6 ml, initial pH 6. The peak enzyme activity was observed while supplementing maltose as carbon, ammonium chloride and soybean meal as nitrogen (inorganic and organic) source and 0.01M phosphate concentration in the substrate. The thermostability and the characteristics of the enzyme suggest that this is a promising isolate which produce good quality enzyme and merits further investigations for potential applications in various biotechnological applications.

Key words: -amylase, Solid state fermentation, Agro-wastes substrate, Bacillus licheniniformis

201

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 725-728 (2015)

 

Effect of different plant growth regulators on seedling growth of acid lime

 

Meshram P.C.1, Joshi P.S.1, Bhoyar R.K.1 and Sahoo A.K.*2

 1Department of horticulture, PGI, Dr PDKV, Akola, India

 2Department of fruit science, College of Horticulture, OUAT, Chiplima, India

*e-mail: sahooajit.md@gmail.com

(Received: April 02, 2015; Revised received: September 17, 2015;Accepted: September 22, 2015)

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Abstract: An experimentwas carried out during 2011-12 at Department with an objective to find out suitable plant growth regulator and its concentration for seed germination and seedling growth in acid lime. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with nine treatments and three replications. Seeds were treated with PGR over night before sowing on nursery bed. Different concentrations of growth regulators like GA3 - 50, 100, 150, 200; NAA - 10, 20, 30, 40 ppm were used as seed treatment to test the growth of seedlings. The growth parameters like germination percentage, height of seedling, number of leaves per plant, diameter of stem, leaf area, chlorophyll index, tap root length, number of secondary roots per plant, girth of roots, root shoot ratio, root density, final survival percentage of nursery seedlings were observed. Among these different treatments GA3 200 ppm was found significantly superior and high net monetary returns also obtained from treatment T4 (GA3 200 ppm seed treatment) with high benefit cost ratio.

Key words: Acid lime, GA3, Growth parameter, NAA and Seed germination

202

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 729-731 (2015)

 

Effect of potassium nutrition on nutrient uptake and soil fertility by Pearl millet

 

S.S. Toncher*1, M.R. Deshmukh1 and P.A. Gite2

 1Department of Agronomy, Post Graduate Institute 2SSAC, Dr. P.D.K.V,Akola-444 104, India

*e-mail: sandiptonchar@gmail.com

(Received: June 10, 2015; Revised received: November 01, 2015;Accepted: November 04, 2015)

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Abstract: In Vidarbha region, there is yield gap due to inadequate and imbalance supply of fertilizers and lack of distinct fertilizer recommendation for plenty of varieties and hybrids of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.). To bridge this gap, a field experiment was conducted in vertisol during July to September of 2013-2014 to study the effect of potassium nutrition along with recommended dose of fertilizers on nutrient uptake and soil fertility. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design replicated four times with five treatments of different levels of potassium. The maximum total nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake (58.22, 13.95 and 57.95 kg NPK/ha) was recorded with treatment RDF+45k and it was on par with RDF+30k. The available N, P and K content of soil was found to be higher due to enhancedlevels of applied nutrients to the soil. Thus, balanced fertilization not only provided higher nutrient uptake but also sustained the soil fertility.

Key words: Nutrient uptake,Pearl millet, Potassium, Soil fertility, Vertisol

203

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 732-736 (2015)

 

Quality and nutrient uptake by blackgram as influenced by various doses of potassium

 

P.P. Kurhade1, H.N. Sethi2 and S.S. Toncher*1

 1Department of Agronomy, Post Graduate Institute 2Dy.CSPO, CDF, Wani Rambhapur, Dr. P.D.K.V,Akola-444 104, India

*e-mail: sandiptonchar@gmail.com

(Received: June 10, 2015; Revised received: November 01, 2015;Accepted: November 04, 2015)

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Abstract: A field experiment entitled “Effect of potassium on growth, yield and quality of blackgram” was carried out at Pulses Research Unit, Dr. PDKV, Akola, during kharif season of 2013 on clayey soil. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with six treatments and four replications. Treatments consisted ofRDF alone, RDF+ 20 kg K2O ha-1, RDF+ 30 kg K2O ha-1, RDF+ 40 kg K2O ha-1, RDF + Foliar spray of KCL 1.5% (At flowering and 10-15 days after flowering) and RDF + Foliar spray of KCL 1.5% (At flowering) (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5 and T6 respectively). Experimental results revealed that Application of RDF + 40 kg K2O ha-1 recorded significantly highest protein content (22.16%) which was at par with RDF + 30 kg K2O ha-1 and RDF + 20 kg K2O ha-1 whereprotein contentwas recorded (22.83 %) and(21.34 %) respectively.The lower protein content was observed in RDF alone control treatment. The uptake of NPK were recorded significantly highest in treatment RDF+ 40 kg K2O ha-1, which was statistically at par with RDF+ 30 kg K2O ha-1 and RDF+ 20 kg K2O ha-1.

Keywords: Blackgram, Potassium, Nutrient uptake, Quality

204

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 737-740 (2015)

 

Prevalence of bovine brucellosis in different districts of Punjab State by sero-epidemiological studies

 

Hazarika D*, Sharma N. S., Arora A. K, Paviter Kaur and Mudit Chandra

Department of Veterinary Microbiology, GADVASU, Ludhiana-141004, India

*e-mail: dhazarika34@gmail.com

(Received: April 20, 2015; Revised received: October 16, 2015;Accepted: October 20, 2015)

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Abstract: The present study was carried out to study the sero prevalence of brucellosis in cattle and buffaloes by Rose Bengal Plate Agglutination test (RBPT) and indirect ELISA (i-ELISA). A total of 1186 serum samples from cattle and buffaloes suffering from abortions in the last trimester and reproductive disorders were collected from different areas of Punjab which included Ludhiana (n=599), Moga (n=154), Patiala (n=124), Amritsar (n=77), Jalandhar (n=52), Hoshiarpur (n=36), Bathinda (n=31), Gurdaspur (n=29), Mohali (n=28), Barnala (n=27), Sangrur (n=19) and Ferozepur (n=10). The overall seroprevalence of brucellosis in cattle and buffaloes was 31.45% and 33.14% by RBPT and i-ELISA, respectively. Prevalence of brucellosis in cattle by RBPT and i-ELISA was 25.15% and 26.45%, respectively, whereas the prevalence of brucellosis in buffaloes was 46.94% and 49.56%, respectively. Among the animals suffering from reproductive disorders highest prevalence for both cattle and buffaloes by RBPT was reported from Sangrur district 68.42% (13/19) of Punjab and 66.66% (24/36) in Hoshiarpur district of Punjab by i-ELISA.

Keywords: Brucella, Seroprevalence, Cattle, Buffaloes, RBPT, i-ELISA.

205

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 741-742 (2015)

 

Performance of papaya genotypes against papaya ringspot and papaya leaf curl diseases

 

A.N. Chaubey*1, S.K. Pande1, S.K. Singh1 and S.K. Yadav2

1Department of Plant Pathology, N.D. University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad-224 229, India, 2KVK, Azamgrah,India

*e-mail: aditya.chaubey2011@gmail.com

(Received: March 12, 2015; Revised received: October 18, 2015;Accepted: October 20, 2015)

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Abstract: Papaya fruit is known as wholesome fruit which rank first in respect to nutritional, medicinal and nourishment properties. A number of virus attacks on papaya crop. The experiment was conducted to evaluate the resistance varieties of papaya against papaya ringspot and papaya leaf curl diseases. Out of 15 varieties, none of genotypes was found the immune/resistant, eleven varieties viz., Harichhal,Pusa Majesty,CO-1, CO-2, CO-6, Pusa Delicious, CO-3, Pusa Nanha, CO-4, Pusa Dwarf, Pusa Gaint and was found moderately resistant and four varietiesviz., CO-5, MF-1, Washinton and CO-7 was showed susceptible against papaya ringspot, on the other hand three varietiesviz., CO-3, Harichhal and CO-2 was showed resistant and twelve varietiesviz., Pusa Gaint, CO-6, Pusa Delicious, Pusa Majesty Pusa Dwarf, CO-1, CO-5, Pusa Nanha, Washinton, CO-7, CO-4 and MF-1 was showed moderately resistant against papaya leaf curl viral disease. So, growing resistance varieties is one of the cheapest and most economic method then other preventing measures.

Keywords:- Papaya genotypes, Papaya ringspot, Papaya leaf curl, Viraldiseases

206

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 743-746 (2015)

 

Genetic divergence in bottle gourd [Lagenariasiceraria (Molina) Standl]

 

B. Muralidharan*1, V. Kanthaswamy1, B.Sivakumar2 K.G.Janaranjani1

1Department of Horticulture, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru College of Agriculture and Research Institute, Tamilnadu Agricultural University,Karaikal, Puducherry (U.T.)-609 603, India;

2Centre of Excellence in Millets, TNAU, Tamil Nadu – 606 603, India

*e-mail: muralikaet@gmail.com

(Received: May 15, 2015; Revised received: October 04, 2015;Accepted: October 08, 2015)

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Abstract: Investigation on the divergence of bottle gourd genotypes foryield and diversity was carried out in the Department of Horticulture, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru College of Agriculture and Research Institute, Karaikal, U.T. of Puducherry from January to March 2011.The twenty four genotypes of bottle gourd were grouped into nine cluster by D2 analysis. Genotypes from North India (New Delhi) IC-371695 etc., and South India (Karnataka) ArkaBahar Genotypewere scattered in different clusters and revealed that geographic diversity, need not be a suffering factor for genetic divergence. The maximum inter cluster distance was observed between cluster VII - 3863.34 (62.16) and VIII - 3657.43(60.48). Hence genotypes belonging to these different clusters can be used in hybridization to obtain desirable segregants. The nature and magnitude of genetic diversity among twenty four bottle gourd genotype assembled from different geographical locations was measured through multivariate analysis using Mahalinobnis D2 to identify suitable and best genotype for hybridization. There is possibility of getting suitable recombinant for yield and quality during future breeding programme.

Key words: Bottle gourd, Geneticdiversity, D2 Statistics, Cluster pattern

207

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 747-750 (2015)

 

Impact of seed treatment with chemicals and botanicals

on storability of fodder maize (Zea mays L.)

 

Shivagouda Patil*1 and Merwade, M. N.2

1Department of Seed Science and Technology, UAS, Dharwad-580005, India

2Department. of Seed Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Vijayapur-586103, India

*e-mail: patilshivagouda9@gmail.com

(Received: May 16, 2015; Revised received: October 05, 2015;Accepted: October 08, 2015)

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Abstract: An experiment was carried out to know the influence of seed treatment with chemicals and botanicals on seed storability of fodder maize cv. South African Tall under ambient conditions. The results revealed that in all treatments germination decreased as storage period progressed. The seed treated with Vitavax Power @ 3g/kg of seeds maintained significantly maximum seed quality attributes such as germination (90.50 %), root length (16.91 cm), shoot length (15.03 cm), seedling dry weight (1.35 g) vigour index –I (2891) and vigour index –II (122.3), whereas least was found in the control (81.25 %, 13.68 cm, 12.72 cm, 1.15 g, 2144 and 93.8, respectively) up to twelve months of storage.

Key words: Vitavax power, Chemicals, Botanicals and Germination

208

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 747-750 (2015)

 

Impact of seed treatment with chemicals and botanicals

on storability of fodder maize (Zea mays L.)

 

Shivagouda Patil*1 and Merwade, M. N.2

1Department of Seed Science and Technology, UAS, Dharwad-580005, India

2Department. of Seed Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Vijayapur-586103, India

*e-mail: selvarulindia@gmail.com

(Received: April 19, 2015; Revised received: October 19, 2015;Accepted: October 22, 2015)

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Abstract: To evaluate the long term effect of fertilization and manuring on soil fertility and crop productivity of finger millet under finger millet-maize cropping sequence, a long term fertilizer experiment (LTFE) trial was started during 1972 and being maintained by Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore. Ten treatments with four replications under randomized block design with a plot size of 20 m X 10 m are being evaluated in LTFE field experiment. The reporting experiment with finger millet crop was conducted during 2012. The results revealed that the highest grain yield of 3125 kg ha-1 and straw yield of 5123 kg ha-1 were recorded in the treatment that received 100% recommended dose of fertilizer nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium along with farm yard manure (10 t ha-1) and it was closely followed by 150 % NPK. Omission of sulphur and potassium from 100% RDF NPK was recorded comparable yield to that of 100% RDF NPK. But addition of ZnSO4 @ 37.5 kg ha-1 along with 100 % NPK recorded higher grain yield to the tune of 7 % increase over 100 % NPK. Continuous addition of N alone significantly and remarkably reduced the grain and straw yield of finger millet when compared to other fertilized and manured treatments. Grain, straw and total uptake of NPK also high in the INM practice. The results also revealed that there was not observed significant changes in soil pH and EC in post harvest soil of finger millet. Continuous manuring along with 100% NPK recorded higher organic carbon content than inorganic fertilization. Available NPK was also found to be high under INM practice. Regarding micro nutrients, DTPA extractable zinc, copper and iron was found to be deficient in all the treatments whereas manganese seems to be sufficient in all the treatments.

Key words: Long term fertilization, Finger millet, Yield, uptake, Soil available nutrients

209

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 757-760 (2015)

 

Cisgenesis: Genetic engineering introduced spark to traditional breeding methods

 

Bandan Thapa1, Tanay Joshi*2, Krishna Kumar Jangid3 and Pawan Basnet4

1Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding), 3Department of Plant Physiology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, BHU-221005, India

2Department of Agronomy (Crop Physiology), College of Agriculture, University of Philippines-4031, Republic of Philippines

4Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University-221005, India

*e-mail: tanayjoshi19@gmail.com

(Received: March 06, 2015; Revised received: October 03, 2015;Accepted: October 06, 2015)

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Abstract: Cisgenesis is a novel approach which facilitates transfer of artificial gene or DNA sequence information from crop plants themselves or crossable species. An innovation, leading to clean transformation without leaving a selectable marker gene behind. It is a one- step linkage-drag-free method which is highly attractive, and embodies the possibility to stack genes from different sources, even if they originate from the same chromosomal position in different species or accessions in contrary to that of introgressive breeding which is a multiple step gene transfer method with linkage drag. Gene transfer through transgenesis has been facing problems with GMO regulations. In reality, it was expected to be a ‘one stop solution’ for array of problems affecting crop production. However, this concept is firmly refuted by the ardent critiques and sent to a back burner, because of its probable association with health hazards, potential threat to the environment and various safety issues, due to the involvement of expat genetic material. This condition has necessitated inclination towards alternative technology like ‘cisgenesis’ which came up as quite promising tool, directed towards novel crop improvement techniques, without risking the natural resource base. In totality, cisgenic plants are as safe as, or even safer than traditionally bred plants or plants obtained by means of induced mutation breeding, as it avoids linkage drag therefore, prevents risks from unknown hitch hiking genes. Hence, it can be applied for resistance and quality breeding in most of the important crops.

Key words: Cisgenesis , Genetically modified organisms, Transgenesis, Linkage drag.

210

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 761-766 (2015)

 

Medicinal importance and utilization of Rhododendron- A Review

 

Kirti Kumari*1, Himani Srivastava2 and V.D. Mudgal3

1Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Ranichauri, Tehri Garhwal, UUHF, Uttarakhand, India

2Research Scholar, College of Technology and Engineering MPUAT Udaipur, India

3Professor, Department of Processing and Food Engineering, CTAE, MPUAT, Udaipur-313001, India

*e-mail: kumarikirti95@gmail.com

(Received: April 29, 2015; Revised received: October 05, 2015;Accepted: October 08, 2015)

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Abstract: Rhododendron arboreum is an evergreen shrub or small tree with a showy display of bright red flowers. Rhododendron is the national flower of Nepal and is known as (Laligurans) & the state tree of Uttarakhand. It is called ‘Burans, Bras, Buras or Barahke- phool’ in local dialect. Rhododendron arboreum is a wild plant species possesses high ecological importance and the flower of the species having unique medicinal and nutritional value. It is widely popular for the processed juice of its flowers which have gained market popularity as rhodojuice /sharbat. The paper highlighted medicinal value and potential of R. arboreum for bioprospecting by making value added products to improve the livelihood and employment opportunities of hill farmers.

Key words- Rhododendron, History, Medicinal uses,Juice preparation, Ornamental uses

211

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 767-770 (2015)

 

Effect of weed and nutrient management on productivity of sorghum and mustard cropping system under rain fed condition

 

Manish Srivastava*, A. K. Singh and B. L. Suman

Division of Agricultural Engineering, Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi – 284003, India

*e-mail: manish.agronomy@gmail.com

(Received: March 09, 2015; Revised received: October 01, 2015;Accepted: October 03, 2015)

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during karif and rabi seasion of 2005-2006 and 2006-07 at Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi to know the response of fodder sorghum – mustard cropping system to integrated weed and nutrient management. Significantly increase in green fodder yield, seed yields, dry matter and crude protein yield of sorghumrecorded with successive increase in hand weeding by khurpi at 30 DAS + 75% NPK(RDF) + 25% FYM followed by isoproturon + 75% NPK (RDF) + 25% FYM and statistically at par with hand weeding by khurpi at 30 DAS + 50% NPK (RDF) + 50% FYM and hand weeding by khurpi at 30 DAS +75% NPK (RDF) + 25% FYM gave significantly higher green fodder yield (432.00 and 440.20 q/ha), dry matter yield (164.16 and 169.08) of sorghum in 2005-06 and 2006-07, respectively. Significantly higher siliquae/plant, 1000-seed weight and oil content (%) and seed yield of mustard (12.30 and 12.49 q/ha) in 2005-06 and 2006-07, respectively. Weeding by khurpi at 30 DAS and isoproturon @ 0.75 kg/ha combination with 75% NPK (RDF) + 25% FYM reduced the weed density, increase weed control efficiency (%) in fodder sorghum and mustard during both the years of experimentation. These treatments gave maximum net return (23120.71 and 23009.86 Rs./ha) in sorghum and mustard, respectively. Weeder cum mulcher at 30 DAS + 50% NPK (RDF) + 50% FYM also maintained soil fertility as indicated by higher content of organic carbon, available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

Keywords: weed management, nutrient management, productivity, fodder sorghum and mustard

 

212

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 771-772 (2015)

 

Effect of pre-harvest application of Ca, Zn and B on

prolonged storeability of ber (Zizyphus mauritiana Lamk.)

 

Ajay Rajput1, Rajesh Tiwari1, Ankit Pandey2 and S.P.S. Somvanshi*3

1Department of Fruit Science, 2Department of Post harvest Technology, 3 Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Mandsaur,

R.V.S.K.V.V., Campus, College of Horticulture, Mandsaur-458 001, India

*e-mail: surya.somvanshi@gmail.com

(Received: May 21, 2015; Revised received: October 14, 2015;Accepted: October 20, 2015)

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted in the research fruit orchard of K.N.K. College of Horticulture, Mandsaur (M.P.) india; in randomized block design (RBD) with ten treatments consisting of foliar spray of Calcium Nitrate, Zinc Sulphate, Borax and control sprayed twice. First spray was done during November 2013 at initial stage of fruiting and second spray is repeated after 3 weeks of first spray. Harvested fruits were kept in plastic trays and stored at ambient room temperature and relative humidity. The treated fruits were analyzed for (PLW) physiological loss weight the minimum (19.40%) during storage was recorded with T5 (0.4% Zinc sulphate) followed by T8 (0.4% Borax) against the maximum (34.91%) physiological loss in weight under control. decay loss (%) at 0, 3rd, 6th and 9th day of storage. Among the various treatments, the minimum percentage of decay loss (61.11%) was recorded with T5 (0.4% Zinc sulphate) at the end of storage period against the maximum (83.22%) under control. During storage minimum reduction in fruit size (length and diameter) observed in T5 (0.4% Zinc sulphate) and maximum in T0 (control). It may therefore, be recommended that the pre-harvesting application of (ZnSo4 @ 0.4%) improve the storage life and quality at ambient room temperature.

Key words:Pre-harvest sprays, Storeability, Shelf life, Physiological quality, Ber

 

213

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 773-776 (2015)

 

Varietal performance, correlation studies and economics of anthurium cultivation under protected conditions

 

Latha S*, Reddy B.S and Sudeep H.P

Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Chikkamagalur-577132, India

*e-mail: lathas805@gmail.com

(Received: April 10, 2015; Revised received: October 16, 2015;Accepted: October 20, 2015)

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Abstract: The study was conducted on College of Horticulture, Mudigere, during 2012-13 to evaluate the performance of seven anthurium varieties viz., Fantasia, Acropolis, Arabhavi Local, Tropical, Fire, Cheers and Midori. Results revealed that varieties significantly influenced all the vegetative and flower parameters. Among the anthurium cultivars studied, with respect to performance in terms of vegetative growth and flower quality of anthurium, variety Tropical was found superior, and with respect to flower yield, varieties Arabhavi Local and Midori were identified as promising suitable cultivars for cultivation under protected condition. A correlation study was carried out on fifteen growth and yield traits in seven cultivars of Anthurium. Number of flowers per plant exhibited highly significant and positive correlation with number of leaves per plant (+0.631), number of suckers per plant (+0.699) and significantly positive correlation was observed with leaf area per plant (+511). While, the trait exhibited highly significant and negative correlation with the number of days to unfolding of spathe from initiation of flower (-0.601) and number of days to unfolding of spathe from initiation of flower (-0.622). Economics study showed that there is a significant difference with respect to varieties. Among the seven varieties tried, Variety Arabhavi Local had recorded the highest B: C ratio (2.17) and lowest in variety Fantasia (0.39). Total cost of cultivation of anthurium varieties under greenhouse was Rs.1,35,295.84 per 560m2.

Key words: Anthurium, Varieties, Protected cultivation, Correlation and Economics

214

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 777-778 (2015)

 

Population dynamics of legume pod borer Maruca vitrata (Geyer) and blue butterfly Lampides boeticus L. on short duration pigeonpea

 

Anil Kumar Pandey, Ram Keval, and Amit Yadav*

Department of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi - 221 005, India

*e-mail: amitento21@gmail.com

(Received: April 10, 2015; Revised received: October 16, 2015;Accepted: October 20, 2015)

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Abstract: Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) is an important crop in semi-arid tropical and sub- tropical farming systems, providing high quality vegetable protein, animal feed, and firewood. Insect pests feeding on flowers, pods, and seeds are the most important biotic constraint affecting pigeon pea yields. Seasonal dynamics of insect pests in pigeon pea during kharif 2010-11 revealed that activity of legume pod borer Maruca vitrata commenced from 44th standard meteorological week (SMW) and continued until 50th SMW. The Peak population was noticed twice in 46th and 48th standard week with 0.30 and 0.30larva/plant respectively.Blue butterfly, Lampides boeticus incidence was found to attain its peak from 47th to 49th standard week with peak population of 0.20 larva /plant. Such study helps in development of suitable management strategy as well as helps in timely forecasting of pest incidence.

Key Words: Pigeonpea, Legume pod borer, Blue butter fly

215

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 779-782 (2015)

 

Varietals screening against shoot and fruit borer (Leucinodes orbonalis G.) of brinjal

 

Narendra Sharma1, Satyakumari Sharma*2, J.A. Chudasama3 and N.S. Bhadauria1

1Department of Entomology, Rajmata Vijyaraje Sindhiya Krishi Vishwa Vidhyalaya, Gwalior,-474002, India

2Department of Agronomy, 3Department of Entomology, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh-362001, India

*e-mail: satya.sharma77@yahoo.com

(Received: April 10, 2015; Revised received: October 16, 2015;Accepted: October 20, 2015)

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Abstract: Study was carried out to determine less susceptible variety of brinjal and efficacy of insecticide against shoot & fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis Guenee during kharif season of 2011-12 at R.V.S.K.V.V., Gwalior (M.P.). It was found that per cent fruit damage among different varieties was ranged from 4.6 to 12.9 per cent on number basis and 3.7 to 10.8 per cent on weight basis. Variety Deshi was found less susceptible followed by Pusa kranti, Pant rituraj, NDB-4 and Pant samrat. Whereas variety Pusa bindu found highly susceptible followed by Jawahar-64, Jumbo Hy, NSC Hy, Pusa shyamla and NBH-249. On the basis of shoot infestation Pusa shyamla was found highly susceptible of 10.50 per cent followed by Pusa bindu and NDB-4. Variety Deshi of 1.30 per cent was found less susceptible followed by Jawahar 64, NBH-249 and NBH-21. On the basis of varietal screening and efficacy of insecticides against shoot & fruit borer, variety Deshi and Pusa kranti may be used as a component of IPM against shoot & fruit borer under the protection with insecticidal application of indoxacarb (0.007%), carbosulfan(0.005%) or emamectin benzoate (0.002%) at an interval of 15 DAS.

Key Words: Brinjal, Insecticide, Leucinodes orbonalis, Indoxacarb and Variety

216

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 783-785 (2015)

 

Genetic parameters for yield and its contributing components in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under saline- alkaline condition

 

Gaurav Dharwal, O.P. Verma*, G.P. Verma, P.K. Singh, D.K. Dwivedi and P.K. Yadav

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224229,India

*e-mail: ompverma.verma@gmail.com

(Received: April 08, 2015; Revised received: October19, 2015;Accepted: October 24, 2015)

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Abstract: Forty five diverse rice genotypes including three checks, viz., (Narendra Usar 3, CSR 13 and Usar1) were used for testing in northern eastern plane zone (NEP) of Uttar Pradesh. The experiment was conducted in RBD with three replications, to assess yield and its twelve contributing components under salt affected soil [pH 9.1, EC (dSM-1) 2.10, ESP 52.3]. Analysis of variance revealed highly significant differences amongst genotypes. The highest estimates of PCV and GCV was recorded for majority of the traits. The closeness between the estimates of PCV and GCV for majority of the traits reflected the least influence of environmental factors on the expression of these traits. High heritability along with high genetic advance was recorded for majority of the traits, suggesting the involvement of additive gene action except panicle bearing tillers plant-1, (64.2 and 34.34, respectively) possessing non additive gene action. Hence, emphasis should be given to select these traits to sustain the production and productivity of saline soil.

Key Words: Heritability, GCV, PCV, Henetic advance, Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

217

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 786-788 (2015)

 

Studies on genetic component of variance (graphical and analytical approach) in tomato (Solanumlycopersicum L.)

 

B. K. Yadav* and Sanjive K. Singh

Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Tchnology, Kanpur-208002, India

*e-mail: bkyadav.7246@gmail.com

(Received: April 28, 2015; Revised received: October03, 2015;Accepted: October 07, 2015)

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Abstract: All possible 45 F1s along with 10 parents were grown in RBD with three replications. Parents and F1s were transplanted in two rows with 10 plants in each row while F2s were transplanted in four rows with 20 plants in each row with 75 x 60 cm spacing in each replication. The observations were recorded for plant height, days to flowering, number of fruit bearing branches per plant, days to maturity, number of clusters per plant, number of fruit per cluster, fruitlength, fruit width, number of locules per plant, number of fruits per plant , yield per plant, T.S.S., dry matter, lycopene, ascorbic acid, acidity in terms of citric acid and TLCV incidence I, II, II, IV and V stages were taken only for parents and their best crosses in tomato. The graphical approach of diallel analysis of quantitative traits revealed over dominance for plant height, days to flowering, days to maturity, number of fruits per cluster, number of locules per fruit, number of fruits per plant and yield per plant and all stages of TLCV incidence and partial dominance for number of fruit bearing branches per plant, number of clusters per plant, fruit length and fruit width in F1. In F2 generation over dominance was found for plant height, days to flowering, days to maturity, number of locules per fruit, number of fruits per plant and yield per plant and all stages of TLCV incidence while partial dominance for number of fruit bearing branches per plant, number of clusters per plant, number of fruits per cluster, fruit length and fruit width.The analytical approach additive and dominance component exhibited highly significant for these traits. Average degree of dominance showed over dominance for both generations while degree of dominance through combining ability variance showed partial dominance.

Key word: Genetic Component of Variance, Graphical and Analytical approach and Dominance

218

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 789-792 (2015)

 

Effect of various mulches on soil and weed parameters in Kinnow orchard

 

Bhanukar Manoj*, Sindhu S. S., Preeti and Singh Deepak

Department of Horticulture, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125004, India

*e-mail: bhanumanu0326@gmail.com

(Received: April 28, 2015; Revised received: October03, 2015;Accepted: October 07, 2015)

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Abstract: The treatments comprising six levels of mulches which were laid out in a randomized block design with three replications. In the experiment, the minimum value for soil pH (7.7) and ECe (2.25), while, maximum values for soil moisture per cent at different depths 0-15cm (21.49), 15-30cm (22.70), 30-60cm (22.95) and available Nitrogen (243.04), Phosphorous (15.79) and Potassium (291.78) were recorded with black polythene 200µ mulch. Lowest number, fresh and dry weight of weeds at all monthly intervals were observed with Black polythene 200µ mulch. The Black polythene 200µ mulch was found most effective among other mulches for maintaining soil parameters and reduced the growth of weeds.

Key words: Kinnow, mulch, soil moisture, weeds

219

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 793-794 (2015)

 

Effect of sowing time on seed germination and seedling growth of jamun (Syzyuim cumini Skeels.)

 

S.P. Singh, Sarvesh Singh*, Priyanka Singh, Anupam Tiwari and Ramkesh Meena

Department of Horticulture, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, India

*e-mail: sarbhu1@gmail.com

(Received: March 24, 2015; Revised received: October 15, 2015;Accepted: October 18, 2015)

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Abstract: The effect of sowing time on germination of S. cumini seeds revealed that different treatments had a significant influence on seed germination, duration of germination, height and diameter of seedling, number of leaves, seedling survival, transplanting success and buddable seedling per cent. The highest percentage of germination was recorded on 30th July sown seeds. Seed germination started in 12 days after sowing and completed in 15 days. The minimum duration for germination was recorded when the sowing of seeds was done on 15th and 30th July. Height and diameter of seedling varied significantly with sowing time and maximum height and diameter of seedling were noted in 30th June sown seeds. Number of leaves per seedling also influenced by sowing time and maximum (25.92) number of leaves per seedling was recorded in 15th July sown seeds. Sowing time greatly influenced the seedling survival in nursery. Maximum (98.60%) seedling survival was obtained, when seeds were sown on 30th September. The transplanting success ranged between 94.38 and 99.61 per cent and highest transplanting success was noted in 15th July sown seeds. However, highest percentage (90.86) of buddable seedlings was obtained with 30th June sown seeds.

Key words: Propagation, Germination, Rootstock, Seedling and Orchardists

220

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 795-798 (2015)

 

Studies on genetic variability, heritability and genetic advancein turmeric (Curcuma longa L.)

 

Vinayendra Pratap Singh*1, V.P. Pandey1, S.K. Verma2, V.K. Vimal1 and B.K. Singh1

1Department of Vegetable Science, 2 Department of Horticulture, N.D.U. A. & T., Faizabad- 224 229, India

*e-mail: vps6954@gmail.com

(Received: February 26, 2015; Revised received: October 23, 2015;Accepted: October 25, 2015)

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted with 80 turmeric genotypes for 12 characters to know the genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance in turmeric. The present investigation found genetic variation for various traits in turmeric. Analysis of variance showed that checks were highly significant difference in relation to all phenotypic characters. The phenotypic coefficient of variation was higher in magnitude than genotypic coefficient of variation. The maximum phenotypic coefficient of variations were estimated for weight of primary rhizome per plant (13.83%) followed by number of tertiary rhizome (12.38%), TSS percent (12.21%), weight of mother rhizome (10.87%), number of leaves per plant (9.555%) and number of primary rhizome per plant (8.601). Heritability estimates were high for dry matter percent (98.5%) followed by weight of primary rhizome per plant (96.6%), weight of mother rhizome (93.2%), number of secondary rhizome per plant (92.5%), number of tertiary rhizome per plant (89.4%), number of leaves per plant (82.6), and number of primary rhizome per plant (80.8%). The genetic advance percent of mean was highest for weight of primary rhizome per plant (27.53%) followed by number of tertiary rhizome per plant, weight of mother rhizome, moderate in case of number of leaves per plant, dry matter percent, number of primary rhizome per plant, number of secondary rhizome per plant, rhizome yield q/ha, TSS percent, weight of fresh rhizome per plant, low in case of number of tillers per clump and plant height.

Key words: Genetic advance, genetic variability, germplasm, heritability, turmeric.

221

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 799-800 (2015)

 

Effect of integrated nitrogen management on growth, yield of hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) and soil health under reclaimed sodic soil

 

Raj Kumar*1,Brijesh Kumar Verma2 and Ved Prakash1

1Department of Soil Sci. &Agril. Chemistry, 2Department of Agronomy N.D.U.A. & T., Faizabad – 224 229, India

*e-mail: rkpnduat@gmail.com

(Received: March 03, 2015; Revised received: October 27, 2015;Accepted: October 29, 2015)

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during Kharif season of 2012 to study the effect of Integrated Nutrient Management on growth, yield of hybrid rice and soil health under reclaimed sodic soil. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Block design with 11 treatment combinations viz T1 control T2 100% RDF N (urea), T3- 75 % N (urea) + (FYM), T4 - 50 % N (urea) + 50 % N (FYM), T5- 25 % N (urea) + 75 % N + 75 % N (Poultry manure), T6 – 75 % N (urea) + 25 % N (Poultry manure), T7 - 50 % N (Urea) + 50 % N (Poultry Manure), T8- 25 % N (Urea) 25 % N (FYM), T9- 75 % N (Urea) + 25 % N (Press mud), T10 -50 % N (Urea) + 50 % N (Press mud), T11 -25 % N (Urea) 75 % N (Press mud) with three replication. Integrated Nitrogen Management (INM) increased the growth yield of hybrid rice, when nitrogen was applied in 3:1 ratio through urea and poultry manure. Application of nitrogen through organic and inorganic (3:1 ratio) was found more effective to improving the soil health under reclaimed sodic soil. Integrated Nitrogen Managementreduced soil pH, EC, BD, and increased fertility status of the soils in respect to OC, N, P & K. Maximum net return per rupees invested was obtained with recommended dose of Urea – N application and almost was similar when nitrogen was applied in 3:1 ratio as inorganic (Urea-N) and organic sources (Poultry manure, Press mud & FYM.).

Key words: Urea, FYM, Poultry manure, Vermi-compost and Hybrid rice

222

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 801-804 (2015)

 

Induction of off-season flowering in custard apple (Annona squamosa L.)

 

Vinay1, G. M. Chithiraichelvan1 and R. Enette Geethika Sequira2

1Division of fruit crops, 2Division of vegetable crops, Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hesaraghatta Lake, Bangalore-560089, India

*e-mail: vingeegmvegs@gmail.com

(Received: June 11, 2015; Revised received: October 28, 2015;Accepted: October 29, 2015)

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Abstract: Custard apple (Annona squamosa) can be called as a delicacy of dry region due to its very sweet delicate flesh. It is a deciduous or semi-deciduous tall woody shrub of about 5-6 meters height having irregularly spreading branches. Pruning and defoliation are essential operations for the induction of off-season flowering and fruiting with better quality and quantity Custard Apple. Trees were subjected to two levels (25% and 50%) of pruning combined with defoliating chemicals (Urea 5%, Ethrel 2000ppm, Potassium iodide 1%, Orthophosphoric acid 1%, and Dormex 1.5%) with control and each treatment replicated thrice. From the finding’s, it is found thatthe maximum number of shoots emerged, Length of the shoots emerged, number of flowered shoots found in the trees, number of flowers per shoot at 30, 60, 90 days of observation were found in Dormex applied trees with pruning, the early initiation of flowering (22.6) 25% pruning + potassium iodide 1% and days required for first flowering found late in T1i.e. control (94.12), Duration of flowering was more (128.33) in 50% pruning + urea 5% and also early fruit was found (106.67) in this treatment and also better vegetative growth obtained in pruned with defoliated trees, that’s in 25 per cent pruning with defoliation chemicals then the control and other treatments, and the maximum off-season yield could be obtained in T7 i.e. 25 per cent pruning combined with 1 per cent Orthophosphoric acid (19.60 kg/plant) and the minimum off-season yield could be obtained in T1i.e. control (15.40). The findings of the investigation have helped in standardizing the required cultural practices on scientific basis for off-season production of annona fruits.

Key words: Pruning, Defoliation, off-season, Custard Apple, Orthophosphoric acid

223

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 805-808 (2015)

 

Genetic variability studies on different seedling progenies of karonda for fruit, yield and quality parameters

 

Shafeeq Bawoor*1, Athani, S. I2., Kumbargire Giriraj Ashok1 and Mahantesh, Y. Jogi1

1KRC College of Horticulture, Arabhavi (UHS, Bagalkot), India

2Regional Horticulture Research and Extension Centre (RHREC) Dharwad (Kumbapur), India

*e-mail: shafeeqfsc@gmail.com

(Received: June 07, 2015; Revised received: October 06, 2015;Accepted: October 10, 2015)

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Abstract: Genetic variability, heritability, genetic advance and genetic advance as a percent over mean for 16 characters were assessed by field evaluation of fifteen seedling progenies of karonda at Kittur Rani Channamma College of Horticulture, Arabhavi during 2011-2012. High degree of variation was observed for all the characters. The difference between phenotypic coefficient of variation and genotypic coefficient of variation were found to be narrow for most of the traits. The high estimates of heritability was found for the characters like number of cluster per plant, number fruits per cluster, number of fruits per plant, fruit length, fruit girth, fruit weight, pulp to seed ratio, weight of pulp, number of seeds per fruit, weight of seeds per fruit and yield per plant, TSS at ripe stage, ascorbic acid at ripe stage, total sugar at ripe stage, reducing sugar at ripe stage and non reducing sugar at ripe stage.

Key words: Karonda, Genetic advance, Heritability, Genotypic variance, Phenotypic variance

224

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 809-811 (2015)

 

Studies on correlation and path coefficient analysis of vigour index and its contributing parameters in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

 

Sarvesh Kumar, K.K. Srivastava, S.C. Vimal, and Sarvjeet

Seed Technology Section, Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding,

N.D.University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224229 (U. P.).

*e-mail: sarveshkumarseedtech90@gmail.com

(Received: March 10, 2015; Revised received: October 26, 2015;Accepted: October 28, 2015)

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Abstract: Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important cereal crop of cool climate and plays a key role in food and nutritional security of India. The objective of this study was to established inter-relationship and direct and indirect effect of various seed and seedling traits on seed vigour index. The sixty genotypes were studied for correlation and path coefficient analysis to evaluate the eleven seed vigour contributing traits in completely randomized design with three replications in seed testing laboratory during 2013-14. A very strong positive association of vigour index was observed with seedling length, root length shoot length and seed germination percentage at phenotypic level.Path coefficient analysis, carried out at genotypic as well as phenotypic level, identified seedling length and seed germination percentage as major direct contributors towards vigour index whereas, root length, shoot length and seed germination percentage emerged as most important indirect contributors to vigour index. The characters identified above as important direct and indirect component in vigour index merit due consideration in formulating effective selection strategy in wheat for improving overall seed quality.

Keywords: Wheat, Correlation coefficient, Path coefficient and Seed vigour

225

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 812-814 (2015)

 

Genetic divergence in exotic genotypes of rice in salt affected soil

 

V. R. Pandey, P. K. Singh, O. P. Verma, P. K. Yadav and Yaslok Singh

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224229, India

*e-mail: ompverma.verma@gmail.com

(Received: April 29, 2015; Revised received: October 28, 2015;Accepted: October 29, 2015)

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Abstract: The Mahalonobis D2 analysis was employed to examine existence of genetic divergence in 52 exotic genotypes of rice on the basis of grain yield and its component in salt affected soil. The fifty two genotypes were grouped into seven distinct non overlapping clusters indicating presence of substantial genetic diversity in the existing material. Clustering pattern of genotypes showed no definite relationship between genetic divergence and geographical origin of genotypes, revealing importance of crossing between superior genotypes of diverse clusters for generating transgressive segregantes. Clusters first exhibited very high inter clusters distances from clusters second, six, fourth and fifth while cluster third have high inter clusters distance from clusters six. Considering the inter clusters distance, clusters means and mean performance of genotypes for different traits the crossing of the superior genotypes. The genotypes exhibiting superior mean performance for grain yield per plant and other important characters in clusters first were IR77644- B-9-3-3-2-1-15-1-AJY1, Narendra Usar Dhan 3 and IR82824-B-SDO2 which merit hybridization with superior genotypes identified as IR78788-B-B-10-1-1-4-4AJY1, ‘IR-78806-B-B-16-1-2-2-AJY2, AJY1 and IR82824-B-SD05 in clusters II; IR-77660-B-9-1-3-1-3-4-5-AJY1 and IR-77644-B-9-3-3-2-1-17-4-AJY in clusters VI; IR-77664-B-25-1-2-1-3-12-4-AJY1,IR-77674-3-B-8-2-14-4-AJY-2 and IR77674-3B-8-1-3-10-3-AJY2 in clusters IV and IR77644-B-9-3-3-2-1-29-3-AJY4, IR77674-3B-8-2-2-14-2-AJY1 and IR77674-3B-8-2-2-12-5-1 in clusters V is recommended for isolating superior segregants for developing high yielding rice varieties for salt affected soil. Similarly the crossing of the promising lines of clusters III (IR82823-B-SD05, IR77674-3B-8-2-2-8-3-AJY 5) with superior lines of divergent cluster V may also appears fruitful for salt affected soil.

Key words: Genetic divergence, exotic genotypes, rice (Oryza sativa L.), salt affected soil

226

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 815-818 (2015)

 

Assessment of genetic diversity among Capsicum annuum L. genotypes using RAPD markers

 

P. V. Savadatti*1, A. M. Devaraja Achar2, E.P. Koshy1 and S.S. Bangi3

1Department of Molecular and Cellular Engineering, 3Department of Biological science,

Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Allahabad-211007, India

2Biotechnology Division, Indo-American Hybrid Seeds (India) Pvt. Ltd, Bangalore-560098, India

*e-mail: agrico.praveen@gmail.com

(Received: May 23, 2015; Revised received: October 24, 2015;Accepted: October 28, 2015)

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Abstract: Genetic diversity in 33 chilli genotypes was analyzed by 13 random primers. The amplification profile of these primers consisted of 109 fragments, of which 68 were monomorphic and 41 were polymorphic. The number of bands generated by each primer varied from 7 (OPA-09, OPB-04, OPD-07, OPD-11 and OPG-14) to 13 (OPB-01) with an average of 8.3 fragments per primer. The percentage of polymorphic bands with different primers ranged from 14.2 to 62.5%. The similarity coefficients detected by RAPD marker ranged from 0.90 to 0.97 which revealed existence of genetic variation among chilli genotypes. The consensus tree constructed showed twelve clusters. Among these clusters, cluster II, III, VII and cluster X were observed as solitary clusters. Cluster VIII is the largest one which includes eight genotypes in it. The RAPD technology proved useful in describing genetic diversity among chilli genotypes.

Key words: Chilli, RAPD, Polymorphism, Genetic diversity

227

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 819-824 (2015)

 

Effect of simulated transportation and packaging materials on physico-chemical properties of ber stored under ambient storage conditions

 

Preeti*, R.K. Goyal and Manoj Bhanukar

Department of Horticulture, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125004, India

*e-mail: parmar.preeti80@gmail.com

(Received: May 07, 2015; Revised received: October 25, 2015;Accepted: October 28, 2015)

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Abstract: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of simulated transportation and packaging materials by providing simulation vibration of 50 rpm for time duration of 3 and 6 hours on physico-chemical properties of ber fruits cv. Umran during transportation and storage under ambient conditions. The total soluble solids, TSS: acid ratio and organoleptic rating first increased and then decreased with increase in duration of storage. The TSS, TSS: acid ratio and ascorbic acid content decreased with increased duration of vibration. The acidity of the fruits first decreased and then increased with increase in period of storage. The minimum losses were observed in the fruits given simulation vibration for 3 hours and stored in CFB boxes whereas, maximum losses were noted infruits given simulation vibration for 6 hours and stored in nylon netted bags. Packaging of fruits in CFB boxes was found most effective in reducing all the losses and keeping the ber fruits more healthy with high consumer acceptability as compared to other two types of packages used.

Key words: Ber, Corrugated fiber board boxes, Gunny bags, Nylon netted bags, Simulation vibration, Umran

228

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 825-828 (2015)

 

Influence of NaCl salt stress on physiological, biochemical changes and isoenzyme pattern in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes

 

Tania Das*1, Mamta Meena2, M. K. Mandavia1 and Sarang S. Sapre1

1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Agronomy, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh-362 001, India

*e-mail: tania.d815@gmail.com

(Received: April 16, 2015; Revised received: October 22, 2015;Accepted: October 26, 2015)

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted with ten wheat genotypes viz. KRL-213, KRL-210, KRL-1-4, KRL-19, GW-173, GW-190, GW-273, GW-322, GW-496 and HD-2932 grown in petridish for 12 DAG in screening test. Petridishes were treated with NaCl concentrations 80 mM and 160 mM. Control maintained with water. Salt stress affected RWC and MSI significantly where both measurements decreased under salinity condition. Biochemical changes i.e. soluble protein reduced under different salinity levels even in tolerant genotypes but significantly enhanced the accumulation of MDA content leading to lipid peroxidation. In the pot study, SOD and CAT isozymes were studied at CRI stage in highly tolerant and highly susceptible genotypes. Changes in isoenzyme banding pattern of antioxidant enzymes showed polymorphism based on the appearance in the genotypes under different salinity levels.

Key words: Salt stress, RWC, MSI, Protein, MDA, Isoenzyme

229

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 829-832 (2015)

 

Production and optimization of bacillus subtilis laccase by solid state fermentation of agro-byproducts

 

Sandeep Singh*1, Ajay Kumar Singh1, Mohammad Hafeez1, Shalini2 and Harison Masih1

1Department of Microbiology and Fermentation Technology, SHIATS, Naini, Allahabad, 211007, India

2Integral University, Lucknow, - 226026., India

*e-mail: sandymicro87@gmail.com

(Received: May 15, 2015; Revised received: October 27, 2015;Accepted: October 29, 2015)

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Abstract: Laccases (E. C. 1.10.3.2, p-diphenol: dioxygen oxidoreductase) are a group of multi-copper containing enzymes that catalyze one-electron oxidation of phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of oxygen to water. Laccases are increasingly being used in food industry for production of cost-effective and healthy foods. To sustain this trend widespread availability of laccase and efficient production systems have to be developed. Laccase producing bacteria was isolated from soil samples collected from different regions of Allahabad. Samples were screened and identified for better laccase producing bacteria on nutrient agar plate containing guaiacol. Bacillus subtilis was found to be the highest laccase producing bacteria isolated from saw mill soil. Highest laccase enzyme was produced by Bacillus subtilis on potato peel used as substrate in solid state fermentation (SSF). Production parameters were optimized and the optimum conditions were found to be at incubation temperature 35°C, incubation period 96 h, pH 8, copper concentration 200 ěg, moisture content 75% and inoculum size 1.5ml.

Key words: Bacillus subtilis, Laccase, Solid state fermentation (SSF)

230

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 833-836 (2015)

 

Character association and genetic divergence studies

in indigenous lines of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell)

 

S. K. Yadav, Tejasvi Singh*and Vinod Singh

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, N D University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224229, India

*e-mail:tejasvisingh1991@gmail.com

(Received: April 30, 2015; Revised received: October 28, 2015;Accepted: October 29, 2015)

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Abstract: This experiment was carried out to evaluate 140 wheat genotypes for character association and divergence analysis in an Augmented Block Design which was consisted on 4 blocks of equal size and each block had 35 plots of test entries along with 5 checks in each block at Main Experiment Station Research Farm of Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad (U.P.) during Rabi 2012-13. Data were recorded on eleven yield attributing characters viz. Days to 50% flowering, Days to maturity, Plant height (cm), Tiller per plant, Spike length (cm), Peduncle length (cm), Flag leaf area (cm2), 1000-grain weight (g), Biological yield per plant (g), Grain yield per plant (g) and Harvest index (%). A very strong highly significant and positive association of grain yield per plant was observed with biological yield per plant followed by harvest index, Tillers per plant and Peduncle length while plant height showed positive and significant association. The 140 varieties of wheat were grouped into 12 distinct clusters. Cluster VI possessing maximum (30) genotypes followed by cluster I, IX and XI (15). The maximum intra-cluster distance was found for cluster IV and minimum for cluster IX. The highest inter-cluster distance was observed between cluster IX and cluster II followed by cluster-X and cluster-II and lowest between cluster IX and VI. The results clearly showed crossing between the entries belonging to cluster pairs having large inter-cluster distances and possessing high cluster means for one or other characters to be improved may be recommended for isolating desirable recombinants in the segregating generations in wheat.

Key words: Wheat, Character association, Diversity, Cluster, Recombinants

231

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 837-840 (2015)

 

Effect of sulphur and zinc on nutrient content in

grasses grown in silvi-pastoral system of agro forestry

 

Kumari Priyanka1, A.K.S. Pariharv1, Pawan Kumar Verma*2, Prakash Yadav3 and Shweta Bhatt2

1Department of agro- forestry N D U A & T Faizabad- 224229, India

2Department of Agronomy (S O A) Lovely Professional University Jalandhar- 144411, India

3Department of agronomy, C S A U A & T Kanpur-208002, India

*e-mail: pawanjrf85@gmail.com

(Received: April 03, 2015; Revised received: October 26, 2015;Accepted: October 28, 2015)

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Abstract: The Silvi pastoral system had Dalbergia sissoo(Forest species) in combination with three grasses specie viz., Pennisetum purpureum, Brachiaria mutica and Panicum maximum. The experiment was carried on sodic wasteland. Trees of D. sissoo were spaced at 6x4 m distance. Between rows of tree three grass species were planted.Under this system, trees were given different fertilizers dose of sulphur and zinc on the protein content of grasses nutrient content of N, P, K, S and Zn. Apart from this, comparative forage yield of three grasses was also studied under same system on sodic soil. The investigated area was divided into 144 total no. of plot. Three grasses Pennisetum purpurium, Penicum maximum, Brachiaria mutica are grown in these plots. Each grass is grown in 48 plots. The maximum N,P,K and S content in grasses where achieved with Sulphur @60 kg ha-1 and zinc @15 kg ha-1individually during all three seasons. However zinc content decreased with increasing sulphur levels in grasses. The soil sample analyzed after harvest of the grass sulphur @0 kg ha-1 and zinc @ 0 kg ha-1, while maximum availability was recorded in sulphur @ 60 kg ha-1 and zinc @ 15 kg ha-1.

Key Words: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sulphur, Zinc and Grasses

 

232

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 8(4) 841-844 (2015)

 

Evaluation of copper toxicity in alluvial soil for growth and yield in maize using special reference to iron

 

Dharam Singh*1 and Kamlesh Nath2

1Department of Environmental Science, I.B.S.B.T., C.S.J.M. University, Kanpur-208002, India

2Department of Environmental Science, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007, India

*e-mail: ds_envi@rediffmail.com

(Received: April 08, 2015; Revised received: October 14, 2015;Accepted: October 16, 2015)

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Abstract: At 5 mg l-1 copper exposed plants showed substantial increase in plant height after 30, 60 and 90 days respectively. The number of pods per plant, length of pod, number of seeds per pod and yield gm/ 50 seeds were decreased after 90 days. The pigment contents chlorophyll, pheophytin and carotenoids were also decreased after 30,60 and 90 days. Inhibitory response of copper (25, 50 and 100 mg L-1) was significant (p<0.05) as it showed decline plant height; number of pods per plant; pods length; number of seeds per pod and yield. The pigment content chlorophyll, pheophytine andcarotenoeds were found decrease in comparison to 5 mg L-1 copper exposed plants, respectively. Likewise fresh weight and moisture content decreased with increase copper concentration. The plants grown on copper treated soil along with 25, 50 and 100 mg L-1 along with iron applicationshowed significant effects (p<0.05) regarding increase in plant growth, yield and pigment content.

Key words: Copper, Iron, Soil, Black gram, Pigments, Antioxidants, Protein and sugar

 

 

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