RESEARCH IN ENVIRONMENT AND LIFE SCIENCES

Volume-9, Number-11, November-2016

 

368

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1301-1304 (2016)

Effect of soil solarization, bio-agent and organic composts for the management of fusarium wilt of chickpea

Madhumita Pandey*, Sobita Simon and Kamaluddeen

Department of Plant Pathology, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, Allahabad-211 007, India

*e-mail: ktiwari24@gmail.com

(Received: November 08, 2015; Revised received: July 03, 2016;Accepted: July 07, 2016)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted to compare the effect of soil solarization, Pseudomonas fluorescens, FYM, vermicompost and neem cake against fusarium wilt of chickpea. Soil solarization was accomplished covering by transparent polythene in summer season for 45 days (during April to May, 2012). At the time of solarization, another treatments viz., Pseudomonas fluorescens @ 2.5 kg ha-1, FYM @ 10 t ha-1, vermicompost @ 10 t ha-1 and neem cake @ 500 kg ha-1 were amended in the soil. After two week, seed of chickpea var. K-850 @ 40 kg ha-1 was shown at the space of 30 cm row to row. Results revealed that Pseudomonas fluorescens shows significantly minimum percentage of wilt incidence (4.40, 18.93, 31.70%) followed by Soil solarization (10.53, 23.86, 35.16%), neem cake (10.40, 28.96, 38.13%), vermicompost (17.03, 36.50, 45.76%) and FYM (19.23, 39.46, 46.96) at 30, 60 and 90 days after sowing (DAS), respectively. However, growth parameters and seed yield of chickpea were increased in the treated plots with Pseudomonas fluorescens followed by rest of treatments including with control.

Key words: Bio-agent, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris, Organic composts, Soil solarization

369

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1305-1309 (2016)

Heavy metals concentration in untreated sewage waste water of Yamuna river and its accumulation after irrigation in sponge gourd for sustainable agriculture

Priyanka Singh*1, Gerard Abraham2, Manoj Kumar1 and A.K. Gupta3

 1Department of Agronomy, 3Department of Chemistry, SHIATS Allahabad-211 007, Uttar Pradesh, India

2Department of Microbiology, IARI, New Delhi, India

*e-mail: priyanka.csmcet@gmail.com

(Received: January 13, 2016; Revised received: July 06, 2016;Accepted: July 11, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The present work entitled was conducted in biochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agricultural, Technology and Sciences, (Formerly Allahabad Agricultural Institute) (U. P) to evaluate studies on Physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of sewage discharged in Yamuna river and bioaccumulation of selected heavy metals in cucurbits family crop as sponge gourd (Luffa aegyptica Roem). The present study was conducted to assess the heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Zn and Ni) concentration of cucurbits family vegetable sponge guard irrigated with untreated sewage waste water in around Yamuna river bank of Allahabad district. The field experiment was laid out in two way classification of Randomized block design with three replications. For securing maximum concentration of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Ni (mg/l) in sewage waste water and Yamuna water was observed in site T2 Gau-Ghat (Nala No. 2) compare than other two sites Gau-Ghat (Nala No. 1) and Baluaghat (Chachar Nala). The study showed that the concentration of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Ni (mg/l) in sewage and Yamuna water varied greatly in (P4 ) sewage waste water compare than other three places as (P1) Upstream, (P2) Down stream and (P3) Mixing point sewage waste water. In case of season maximum concentration was observed in all four heavy metals in summer season compare than other two season as winter and monsoon. The highest concentration of heavy metals in soil (Cu, Fe, Zn and Ni ppm) was observed in site as T2 Gau-Ghat (Nala No. 2) as well as in plant after irrigated the sponge gourd with untreated sewage waste water of Yamuna river from different two sites of Allahabad as Gau-Ghat (Nala No. 1) and Baluaghat (Chachar Nala). Soils polluted with heavy metals have become common across the globe due to increase in geologic and anthropogenic activities. Plants growing on these soils show a reduction in growth, performance and yield. Sewage waste water irrigation applies for crop is an effective method of treating heavy metal polluted soils. It has essential nutrients for soil fertility and productivity.

Key words: Heavy metals, Sewage waste water, Yamuna river, Allahabad

370

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1310-1312 (2016)

Assessment of genetic variability for yield and quality traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes

Arun Kumar*, G.M. Lal and Sunil Kumar

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Allahabad School of Agriculture, Sam Higginbottom Institute of

Agriculture, Technology and Science, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

*e-mail: arun.lko.sst@gmail.com

(Received: January 11, 2015; Revised received: August 16, 2016;Accepted: August 19, 2016)

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Abstract: Eighty one rice genotypes (Oryza sativa L.) were evaluated during Kharif, 2010 for thirteen quantitative traits to examine the nature and magnitude of variability, heritability (broad sense) and genetic advance. Analysis of variance revealed that the differences among eighty one genotypes were significant for all the characters. Among all the traits number of panicles per hill (26.00) exhibited highest estimates of genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) and number of tillers per hill (27.37) exhibited highest phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV) followed by number of spikelets per panicle (24.84), grain yield per hill (19.23), Harvest index (19.33) and Biological yield (17.75). Broad sense heritability was highest for biological yield per hill (99.96), which suggested that this trait would respond to selection owing their high genetic variability and transmissibility. Maximum genetic advance as percent of mean was recorded for number of tillers per hill (96.38) with high value of heritability.

Key words: Rice, GCV, PCV, Heritability, Genetic advance

371

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1313-1315 (2016)

Influence of fruit load and green fruit pickings on seed quality of brinjal

Tejagouda Bhanuje* and S.D. Raikar

Department of Seed Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, UAS, Dharwad, India

*e-mail: bmteja@gmail.com

(Received: February 10, 2016; Revised received: August 14, 2016;Accepted: August 18, 2016)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted at the farmer field Chinchali village, Rayabag taluka, Belgaum district, Karnataka during 2014 and 2015 kharif seasons, to elicit information on influence of fruit load and green fruit pickings on seed quality of brinjalCv. Kudachi local seed production. The experiment consisted of seven treatments with three replications in randomized block design. The results of the pooled data revealed that treatment T7 (Retaining all fruits for seed purpose) resulted in better seed quality parameters. Significant differences due to fruit load and green fruit pickings were noticed for test weight, germination percentage, root length, shoot length, vigour index and seedling dry weight. All these seed quality parameters were significantly higher in theT7 (Retaining all fruits for seed purpose) (4.61g, 90.42%, 8.1cm, 5.9cm, 1260 and 31.00mg, respectively)). Whereas, in the T6 (Plucking initial formed 18 fruits of green stage for vegetable purpose and retaining remaining fruits for seed purpose) which were significantly lower (3.20g,74.50%, 4.9cm, 4.3cm, 687 and 15.80 mg) respectively.

Key words: Fruit load, Green fruit pickings, Brinjal, Seed quality

372

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1316-1318 (2016)

Effect of growth regulators on in vitro root formation in strawberry

Anuradha*, S.K. Sehrawat, Vijayluxmi and Sandhya Bhat

Centre of Plant Biotechnology, Department of Horticulture, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, India

*e-mail: anuradha2917@gmail.com

(Received: March 02, 2015; Revised received: August 11, 2016;Accepted: August 16, 2016)

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Abstract: An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of different combinations of plant growth regulators for in vitro root formation in strawberry shoots regenerated by direct and indirect via callus. It was observed that in direct regenerated microshoots, IBA 1 mg/l took minimum number of days ( 9.00) for root initiation with highest rooting percentage ( 95%) and significantly maximum root length ( 4.11cm.), while NAA 1 mg/l produced significantly maximum number of roots ( 7.00) followed by IBA (1 mg/l). whereas, microshoots regenerated from callus maximum rooting was observed on half strength MS within 8 days of inoculation. The highest number of roots were recorded on media supplemented with NAA at 1 mg/l, while highest length of roots was observed at 1 mg/l IBA.

Key words: Strawberry, in vitro, IBA, NAA,

373

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1319-1320 (2016)

Effect of rhizome size and growth regulators on quality and economics of turmeric var. Suroma

P. Ravi*, P. Shankargouda, Y. J. Mahantesh, N. Kallappa, D. M. Shashidhar and M. R. Shivanand

Department of Plantation, Spices, Medicinal and Aromatic crops, KRC College of Horticulture, Arabhavi,

University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India

*e-mail: pujariravihort556@gmail.com

(Received: January 11, 2016; Revised received: August 05, 2016;Accepted: August 09, 2016)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted to find out the effect of different rhizome sizes and growth regulators on quality and economics of turmeric with three treatments of rhizome sizes viz. S1 finger rhizomes used commercially (25 g), S2 finger rhizomes of 10 g and S3 finger rhizomes of 5 g and four treatments of growth regulators viz. G1 (Cycocel 1000 ppm), G2 (6- BA 5 ppm), G3 (NAA 20 ppm) and G4 (Control) which where replicated three times. The results of the study showed that size of the mother rhizome significantly influenced curcumin and essential oil yield.Driage yield is effected by the growth regulators.Among the different treatments evaluated for quality parameters,.highest curcumin content (9.19 g/100g) was recorded in the treatment S1 (25 g rhizome size), growth regulator did not had significant effect on curcumin content but was highest (9.04 g/100g) in G1 (Cycocel 1000 ppm) while the interaction effect also did not differ significantly. Driage was significantly influenced by the use of growth regulator G3 (NAA 20 ppm) but not by the rhizome size and their interaction effects. Essential oil content was influenced by the use of the rhizome size S1 (25 g) but not by the use of the growth regulators and their interactions. Among the various treatments S1G3 (25 g rhizome + NAA 20 ppm) recorded highest cost benefit ratio.

Key words: Turmeric rhizome sizes, Growth regulators, Curcumin, Driage, Essentail oil, B:C Ratio

374

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1321-1323 (2016)

Biochemical study of different neem (Azadirachta indica) germplasm

R.N. Kewat, N. Vikram* and Ramesh P. Singh

Department of Biochemistry, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad, U.P., India

*e-mail: biochemistnitin@gmail.com

(Received: January 21, 2016; Revised received: August 21, 2016;Accepted: August 26, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The five neem germplasm was collected from the different places of Eastern Uttar Pradesh for the research work. Neem oil used for insecticideal and medicinal properties which also used for pest control in crops. Neem seed cake (residue of neem seed safter oil extraction) when used for soil amendment or added to soil, not only enriches the soil with organic matter but also lowers nitrogen losses by inhibiting nitrification. Neem leaves are used for green leaf manure and also in preparation of litter compost. Neem bark and roots also have medicinal properties. The Neemused as antiallergenic, antidermatic, antifeedent, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antipyorrhoeic, antiscabic, cardiac, diuretic, insecticidal, larvicidal, nematicidal, spermicidal etc. Analysis was employed in the determination of the protein content, methionine content, tryptophan content, lysine content, iodine value, oil content, total mineral content and also fatty acid composition in seeds. The objective of this study is to find the best neem germplasm for the medicinal quality and health beneficial. It can be concluded that the protein content, tryptophan content, methionine content, lysine content and iodine value was recorded maximum in germplasm NDN-1, and maximum oil content in found in NDN-2.The Neemgermplasm NDN-1 which has good protein content, tryptophan content, methionine content, lysine content and iodine value. The Neem germplasm NDN-1 used for further research work.

Key words: Anti-inflammatory, Bark,Esters, Fatty acids, Germplasm andterpenoids

375

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1324-1325 (2016)

Screening of brinjal genotypes for shoot and fruit borer (Leucinodes orbonalis Guenee.) under hill zone of Karnataka

M.H. Ibaad*, V. Srinivasa, Mohammed Azhar Bintory, H.T. Shruthi, Heena Kauser and H. Mohamad Tayeeb Ullah

Department of Vegetable Science, College of Horticulture, Mudigere-577132

University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Shivamogga-577225, India

*e-mail: ibaadmh@gmail.com

(Received: February 14, 2016; Revised received: August 22, 2016;Accepted: August27, 2016)

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Abstract: The present investigation was carried out at College of Horticulture, Mudigere situated under hill zone of Karnataka. Twenty eight brinjal genotypes were screened and observed for the incidence of shoot and fruit borer. Among the twenty eight genotypes none of them were immune/highly resistant to fruit and shoot borer infestation. Shoot and fruit borer incidence on fruit was lower in the genotypes Arka Neelkant (13.80%) followed by IC354597 (19.65%) and Shyamala (20.25%) and higher incidence was recorded in genotypes R-2551 (73.74%), R-2588 (70.89%) and L-3261 (70.66%) recorded higher incidence. Arka Neelkant and IC354597 were found be fairly resistant. Whereas, Alduru Local, R-2554, IC332508, L-3261, IC420590, R-2551, R-2588, IC281112, IC90151, IC374892, IC545884 and R-2592 were highly susceptible genotypes.

Key words: Brinjal, Genotypes, Hill zone, Karnataka, Shoot and fruit borer, Screening

376

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1326-1327 (2016)

Effect of pre-harvest sprays of ca, zn and b on biochemical parameters of ber (zizyphus mauritiana lamk.) during storage

Ajay Rajput1, Rajesh Tiwari1, Ankit Pandey2 and S.P.S.Somvanshi*3

1Department of Fruit Science, 2Department of Post harvest Technology, 3KVK, Mandsaur,

R.V.S.K.V.V., Campus, College of Horticulture, Mandsaur, India

*e-mail: surya.somvanshi@gmail.com

(Received: January 15, 2016; Revised received: August 14, 2016;Accepted: August 19, 2016)

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted in Research Fruit Orchard at K.N.K. College of Horticulture, Mandsaur (M.P.). Ten treatments consisting of foliar spray of Calcium Nitrate, Zinc Sulphate, Borax and control sprayed twice. First spray was done during November 2013 at initial stage of fruiting and second spray is repeated after 3 weeks of first spray. Harvested fruits were kept in plastic trays and stored at ambient room temperature and relative humidity. The treated fruits were analyzed for Total soluble solids (0Brix), acidity (%), sugars (%) [Total, reducing and non reducing sugar] at 0, 3rd, 6th and 9th day of storage. Among the treatments T5 (ZnSo4 @ 0.4%) has proved best pre-harvest application for maintaining the chemical parameters for transportation and storage of ber cv. Seb in terms of TSS and sugars. It may therefore, be recommended that the pre-harvesting application of (ZnSo4 @ 0.4%) improve the storage life and quality at ambient room temperature.

Key words:Pre-harvest sprays, Calcium, Zinc, Boron, Storage, biochemical parameters, Ber

377

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1328-1331 (2016)

Antioxidants and its functions in human body - A Review

Anuj Yadav*1, Rewa Kumari2,Ashwani Yadav, J.P. Mishra, Seweta Srivatva and Shashi Prabha

*1U.P. Council of Agricultural Research, Lucknow, India

2Department of Food Processing and Technology, BilaspurUniversity, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh, India

*e-mail: anuj.0720@gmail.com

(Received: January 08, 2015; Revised received: August18, 2016;Accepted: August22, 2016)

 

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Abstract: Antioxidants are man-made or natural substances that may prevent or delay some types of cell damage. Antioxidants are found in many foods, including fruits and vegetables. Although oxidation reactions are crucial for life, they can also be damaging; plants and animals maintain complex systems of multiple types of antioxidants, such as glutathione, vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin E as well as enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and various peroxides. Traditional herbal medicines, dietary foods were the main source of antioxidant for ancient peoples that protected them from the damage caused by free radicals. Antioxidants are widely used in dietary supplements and have been investigated for the prevention of diseases such as cancer, coronary heart disease and even altitude sickness. Although initial studies suggested that antioxidant supplements might promote health, later large clinical trials of antioxidant supplements including beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E singly or in different combinations suggest that supplementation has no effect on mortality or possibly increases it. These are also use in the food industry in the form of preservatives in foods and cosmetics and to prevent the degradation to rubber and gasoline.

Key word: Antioxidants, Type of antioxidants, Source of antioxidants, Role of antioxidants

378

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1332-1334 (2016)

Genetic divergence in wild melon (Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis)

Shivappa M. Karadi*1, V.M. Ganiger1, Vittal Mangi1, H. P Hadimani1, L.B. Basavaraj1, Bhuvaneshwari G.2 and Sudhakara T.1

1Department of Vegetable Science, 2Department of Post- Harvest technology, College of Horticulture, Bagalkot-587 103, India

*e-mail: shivukaradi@gmail.com

(Received: January 19, 2016; Revised received: August 21, 2016;Accepted: August26, 2016)

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Abstract: Genetic diversity among 24 wild melon genotypes was worked out using D2 statistics. On the basis of genetic distance, these genotypes were grouped in to 8 clusters. Cluster-I was largest, consisting of 17 genotypes, while remaining clusters II, III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII included one genotype each. Clustering was mainly due to either geographical locations or due to genotype. Among 18 characters included for D2 analysis, vitamin C content (71.01%) contributed maximum towards expression of genetic divergence followed by fruit flesh thickness (20.65%), fruit cavity size (3.99%), and leaf area (1.88%). The inter cluster distance (97.23) was highest between the clusters III and VIII. Thus, the genotypes from these clusters may be used as parental donors for future hybridization programme to develop high performing hybrids.

Keywords: Clustering and Genetic divergence, Wild melon (Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis), Genotypes

379

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1335-1339 (2016)

Productivity of rainfed barley (Hordeum vulgare) in South India as influenced by in situ moisture conservation practice, sowing window and row spacing

Anjhu George*, C.P. Mansur and Shantveerayya

Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka, India

*e-mail: anjhugeorge@gmail.com

(Received: February 10, 2016; Revised received: August 11, 2016;Accepted: August 14, 2016)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted at Dharwad in farmers’ field during rabi season of 2013-14to evaluate the response of barley to in situ moisture conservation practice, sowing window and row spacing under rainfed condition. The treatments comprised of two land management practices (M1: broad bed and furrow, M2: flat bed) as main plots, three sowing dates (D1: first fortnight of October, D2: second fortnight of October, D3: first fortnight of November) as sub plots and two row spacings (S1: 30.0 cm, S2: 22.5 cm) as sub-sub plots replicated thrice in a split-split plot design. Crop sown on BBF during second fortnight of October (2913 kg ha-1) recorded significantly higher grain yield compared to rest of the treatments. Crop raised on BBF with row spacing of 22.5 cm recorded significantly more number of tillers m-2 and total dry matter production. Crop sown on BBF during second fortnight of October (2913 kg ha-1) recorded significantly higher grain yield compared to rest of the interactions.

Key words: Broad bed and furrow, Flat bed, Spacing, Sowing dates, Total dry matter, Grain yield

380

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1340-1343 (2016)

Genetic variability among some genotypes of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.)

Amit Kumar*, O.P. Singh, Govind Vishwakarma, Mithilesh Kumar, Rashmi, Jaydev Kumar and Anuj Kumar

Department of Horticulture, N.D.U.A. and T., Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: amitkumartomar.2012@gmail.com

(Received: December 29, 2015; Revised received: August 12, 2016;Accepted: August 17, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The 40 germplasm of opium poppy were evaluated for fourteen characters to indicate the genetic variability present in the selected germplasm. The estimate of heritability, genetic advance and genetic advance in percent of means were worked out. The genotype ND-8 has the maximum plant height (134.80 cm) followed by ND-42 (131.70 cm) with general means 113.84 cm. For number of leaves per plant the highest number of branches/plant was noted for ND-8 (21.17). The high estimates of phenotypic (PCV), genotypic (GCV) and environmental (ECV) coefficient of variation was observed for plant height (PCV- 112.99, GCV- 107.64 and ECV- 5.35) and moderate for days to 1st flowering (PCV-16.14, GCV-15.45 and ECV- 0.69), days to 50% flowering (PCV-12.25, GCV-11.52 and ECV- 0.72), leaf length (PCV-5.32, GCV-5.08 andECV- 0.24), peduncle length (PCV-5.76, GCV-5.44 and ECV-0.32)and number of leaves/plant(PCV-3.43, GCV-3.15 and ECV-0.29). The highest estimate of heritability was recorded by leaf width (96.13%) followed by leaf length (95.52%), days to 50% flowering (95.74%) and plant height (95.26%) whereas, the minimum heritability were noted for number of branches per plant (38.80).

Key words: Opium poppy, Germplasms, GCV, PCV, ECV, Heritability, Genetic Advance (GA) and Genetic Advance in percent of mean.

381

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1344-1346 (2016)

Effect of sources and levels of phosphorus with PSB on productivity of blackgram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper] under rainfed condition

Rajni Rathia and H.S. Kushwaha

Department of Natural Resource Management, Mahatma Gandhi Chitrakoot Gramodaya Vishwavidhyalaya, Chitrakoot, Satna-485 780, India

*e-mail: kushwaha_hs@rediffmail.com

(Received: January 14, 2016; Revised received: August 19, 2016;Accepted: August 26, 2016)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during kharifseason of 2014-2015 on sandy loam soil to find out the appropriate dose of phosphorus through different sources with or without application of PSB (phosphorus solubilizing bacteria) for blackgram. The treatment comprisessix levels of phosphorus (10+PSB, 20+PSB, 30, 30+PSB, 40 and 40+PSB) applied through two sources of phosphorus i.e.single super phosphate (SSP) and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP). Nodules dry weight /plant (0.015 mg/plant), seeds/pod (43.33), seed yield (652 kg/ha) and straw yield (1003 kg/ha) were significantly higher under application of phosphorus sources through DAP. Application of phosphorus at 40 kg P2O5 /ha with PSB was recorded significantly maximum plant height, root spreading, seed yield (607 kg/ha) and straw yield (979 kg/ha). Significantly higher net returns (16,701) and returns per rupee invested (1.94) were recorded in addition of 40 kg P2O5 /ha +PSB treatment. Combined addition of 40 kg P2O5 /ha + PSB through DAP gave significantly superior seed yield (652 kg/ha) and net returns ( 19,614 /hectare).

Key words: Phosphorus sources, Phosphorus levels, PSB and blackgram

382

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1347-1349 (2016)

Impact of work zone environment on knitting industry workers

Meenaxi Tiwari*1, Sudha babel2andGopal Krishnan3

1KVK, Dediapada, NAU, Gujarat; 2TAD, MPUAT, Udaipur; 3Department of TAD, Bharathiar University Coimbatore

*e-mail: meenaxi.tiwari84@gmail.com

(Received: January 18, 2016; Revised received: August 21, 2016;Accepted: August 25, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The study was conducted in 30 knitting industry of Kanpur. Pretested interview schedule was prepared for studying, work environment of the knitting industry. The data was collected from the respective industry administrators/workers of the knitting industry and by personal observation. The study revealed that the knitting industry is a unique and distinct part of the textile industry and is one of the oldest industries in India and knitwear constitutes major proportion of the total garments exports from India.Analysis of data reveals that majority of knitting industry workers were belonging to age group 30-35 years, illiterate, Muslim and OBC category with poor economic status. They were performing industry work about 7-8 hours all the seven days in week. They earn about Rs. 10,000/- month and majority were having 15-20 years of experience. Most of respondents reported that the working environment was unsafe and unhealthy and also found occurrence of various health problems due to poor ergonomic conditions. The study reported that Industry temperature, low light, humid industry environment and machinery noise was also higher than recommended value. Workers also exposed to various biological hazards due to unhygienic condition at workplace. Knowledge regarding work posture, pattern, environment, safe work methods and proper postures can help reduce risk of many health hazards. It can be a very effective way of empowering the industry to mitigate occupational health hazards in knitting industry.

Key words: Work environment, Knitting industry, Health hazards, Work environment etc.

383

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1350-1353 (2016)

Enhancement of soil nutrient availability, yield, water productivity and monetary benefits of sugarcane with subsurface drip fertigation

Parashuram Chandravanshi, Hugar, A.Y.*, Nagaraju, Anandakumar, B.M.,Gururaj Kambli and Anusha

University of Agriculture and Horticulture Sciences, Shimoga (Karnataka), India

*e-mail: ayhugar@yahoo.com

(Received: February 02, 2016; Revised received: August 24, 2016;Accepted: August 29, 2016)

 

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Abstract: Study on viability of sub surface drip irrigation in sugarcane was conductedin different farmers field of bhadra command area of Davangere district. Treatments comprised of T1- without paired row planting + rec.NPK (based on soil test), T2- paired row planting + rec.NPK (based on soil test), T3- paired row with sub surface drip + rec.NPK (based on soil test), T4- farmers practices,T5 – paired row with sub surface drip+ 19:19:19 N: P: K 30 kg / ha as soil application and T6control.The results revealed that paired row with sub surface drip irrigation gave the highest cane yield of 220 t ha-1 followed by paired row planting + rec.NPK (160 t ha-1) and lowest yield obtained in control (80 t ha-1). Similarly water use was 145 ha cm in case of sub surface drip irrigation, followed by paired row surface irrigation of 165 ha cm and highest was 296 ha cm in case of farmers practices with normal planting. The water productivity of sugarcane with sub surface drip irrigation was 1517 kg ha cm-1 where as under farmers practice with normal planting was only 416 kg ha cm-1.Thus, the sugarcane production and water productivity was enhanced by 78.9 and 265 per cent respectively with sub surface drip irrigation.

Key words: Subsurface drip fertigation, Water productivity, Soluble fertilizers, Paired row, Cane yield

384

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1354-1357 (2016)

Effect of growth regulators on growth and yield of Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees)

Sowmya Kumari1, Umesha K.2, Paneeth Y.S.1, Sachin U.S.3

 2Department of Plantation, Spices, Medicinal and Aromatic crops, 1College of Horticulture, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065, India

3College of Horticulture, Bagalkot-591 310, India

*e-mail: sowmya.yashodhas@gmail.com

(Received: January 04, 2016; Revised received: August 26, 2016;Accepted: August 31, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The treatments comprised of growth regulators viz., NAA (40, 50 and 60 ppm), GA3 (25, 50 and 100 ppm) and Paclobutrazol (100, 150 and 200 ppm) and distilled water spray as control. The growth regulators tried in this investigation failed to bring about any significant change in plant height, number of secondary branches and days to first flower appearance and 50% flowering. Application of GA3 at 100 ppm resulted in maximum number of primary branches and secondary branches in main and ratoon crop respectively which was significantly higher compared to control. The plant spread was also improved by GA3 at 50 and 100 ppm during main and ratoon crops respectively, while NAA at 50 ppm resulted in early flowering in both main and ratoon crops of kalmegh. Maximum leaf area was recorded both in main and ratoon crop of kalmegh due to GA3 application at 100 and 50 ppm respectively. Fresh and dry weight of leaf, stem and their total biomass were significantly influenced by all the growth regulator treatments, wherein, paclobutrazol at 100 ppm registered maximum values.The foliar application of NAA at 50 ppm was very effective and recorded maximum cumulative dry herb yield and drying percentage.

Key words: Andrographis paniculata, Plant growth regulators, Whole plant biomass

385

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1358-1360 (2016)

Biochemical estimation of nutritive parameters in waste seed kernel of Mango (Mangifera indica L.)

Ankita Sagar* and R.P. Singh

Department of Biochemistry, Narendra Deva University of AgricultureAnd Technology Narendra Nagar, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: ankitasagar84@gmail.com

(Received: January 09, 2016; Revised received: August 25, 2016;Accepted: August 31, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The scientific management and disposal agro-wastesare a serious problem causing environmental pollution. Reutilization of these biological wastes for unconventional source of food, oil and medicinal uses could be performed after determining there nutritive and biochemical properties. Mango seed despite of its beneficial characters is treated as wastecreating environmental menaces. In the light of the present facts the present investigation was carried out during year 2012-2013. Mangoes were collected from local market. Seeds were separated from fruit, washed thoroughly with tap water, shade and sun dried. The kernels were removed from their tenacious leathery coat. Then they are finely ground into kernel flour. De-fatted mango kernel powder was analyzed for parameters like carbohydrate, protein, crude fiber and ash. Carbohydrate content obtained in mango kernel was reported as 46.85 % which was comparable to other traditional animal meal.The fat content obtained from mango kernel was 12.39 % is quite good to utilizes mango kernel powder as non-conventional source of fat extraction.Therefore, it could be utilized as feed stuff for animals and non-conventional source of oil.

Key words: Mangiferaindica, Seed kernel, Proximate composition, Feed stuff, Proteincarbohydrate, Protein, Crude fiber, Ash

386

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1361-1363 (2016)

Effect of NPK on plant growth, flower quality and yield of gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii)

Khelida Fayaz1, Digendra Singh2, Vivek Kumar Singh*3, Danish Bashir4 and Lagamanna R. Kuller3

1Division of Floriculture and Landscape architecture, 4Division of Fruit Science,

Sher-E-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Kashmir, Shalimar, India

2Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263 145, India

3Department of Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology & Sciences, Allahabad-211 007, India

*e-mail: vivekksingh88@gmail.com

(Received: January 04, 2016; Revised received: August 27, 2016;Accepted: August 31, 2016)

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Abstract:Twelve treatments were used in the trial viz; T1 (Control); T2 (5:7.5:10); T3 (10:10:12.5); T4 (15:12.5:15); T5 (10:15:10); T6 (20:20:15); T7 (15:20:20); T8 (17.5:15:17.5); T9 (20:17.5:20); T10 (10:20:30); T11 (25:20:20) and T12 (30:20:20) NPK g/m2. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Block Design (RBD) with three replications. Maximum treatments had a significant effect on various parameters over the control treatment. The maximum plant height (40.4 cm), number of leaves per plant (17.1), plant spread (58.8 cm), number of suckers per plant (6.3), number of flowers per plant (10.2), number of flowers per plot (204.5), days to first flower bud emergence (57.6 days), flower diameter (11.9 cm), stalk length (71.7 cm), longevity of flower in the plants (23.5 days) were produced by the plants treated with 20:20:15 NPK g/m2. Thus, the treatment comprised of 20:20:15 NPK g/m2 could be useful for harnessing good vegetative as well as reproductive characters of gerbera cv. Lanceolot.

Key words: Gerbera, NPK, Growth, Flower and yield

387

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1364-1365 (2016)

Effect of planting dates on the incidence of rice insect pests

Vijay Kumar Soni*1 and S.N. Tiwari2

1Entomology, S. K. College of Agriculture and Research Station, IGKV, Kawardha, Kabirdham, Chhattisgarh, India

2Department of Entomology, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand, India

*e-mail: vijay.soniji@gmail.com

(Received: February 02, 2016; Revised received: August 28, 2016;Accepted: September 04, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The field experiment were conducted on effect of planting dates on the incidence of rice insect-pests at Norman E. Borloug Crop Research Centre, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand, India during kharif2012. Three dates of planting viz. early, normal and late planting were taken as three treatments, were tested following randomised block design (RBD) with three replications. The interval between each planting was kept as 15 days. Rice crop was raised in plots (60 m2) following recommended package of practices. For each planting, nursery of variety HKR-47 was raised separately which was transplanted at the same age on different dates. Results revealed that infestation of stem borer (Scirpophaga incertulas Walker) was significantly higher in normal and late planted crop as compared to early planted crop. The mean population of brown plant hopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stal.) remained more or less similar in different plantings. However, remarkable difference was noticed in the population of this insect at different interval whereas, the population of white backed plant hopper (Sogatella furcifera)in early planted crop was noticed from 80 to 110DAT with peak at 100DAT while in normal planting it was recorded from 50 to 80 DAT with peak at 80 DAT, in the late planted crop peak was recorded at 70 DAT. The maximum grain yield was recorded in normal planting (4144.6 kg/ha) followed by early planting (3972.0 kg/ha) which was significantly higher as compared to late planted crop.

Key words: Insect-pest, Planting dates, Rice

388

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1366-1369 (2016)

Effect of pre harvest bagging on mango fruit quality

A. Kireeti*1, P.M. Haldankar1, M.R.V. Babu2 and Y.R. Parulekar1

1Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Ratnagiri-415 712, India

2Department of Pomology, ASPEE College of Horticulture and Forestry, N. A.U., Navsari, India

*e-mail: itsmekireeti@gmail.com

(Received: February 26, 2016; Revised received: August 27, 2016;Accepted: September 02, 2016)

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Abstract: Pre harvest bagging of mango fruits to avoid adverse effect of sudden fluctuations in the temperature, fog, un seasonal rainfall etc., on fruit by causing physical damage. The experiment was undertaken to study the effect of pre harvest bagging on fruit quality and shelf life in mango. The results indicated that various chemical parameters were affected significantly due to bagging. The fruits of treatment T6 had maximum TSS (17.61 0B), - carotene (12164.33 µg /100 g) and ranked first for sensory evaluation at ripe. Reducing sugar (2.82%) and total sugar (9.65%) was maximum in T5. Treatment T1 showed best performance for ascorbic acid (79.44 mg/100 g) content of fruit. T4 contributed best performance for reducing sugar (1.32%), total sugar (2.26%) and - carotene (317.9 µg /100 g) at harvest. Bagging had significant effect on spongy tissue incidence and stem end rot. The fruits of T1 and T2 showed best performance in shelf life (17 days) and no incidence of spongy tissue. Thus, it was concluded that bagging prior to harvest has improved fruit quality, shelf life and decreased disease incidence.

Key words: Bagging, Mango, TSS, Shelf life and Stem end rot

389

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1370-1372 (2016)

Development of forecasting model on weather parameters for eastern U.P.

K.K. Pandey*1, V.N. Rai2, B.V.S. Sisodia2, R. Pandey3 and V. Pandey4

1Department of Ag. Statistics, S.K. College of Agri. and Res. Station, Kawardha, C.G.-491 995, India

2Deptt of Ag. Statistics, N D Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj-224 229, Faizabad, India

3SMS (GPB), KVK, Tissuhi, Sonbhadra, Situated at CRS, Tissuhi, Marhihan, Mirjapur-321 310, India

4WDT (Livlihood) IWMP-04, Water Office Balananda Smriti, near club, Ghirisha Ilambazar Block Birbhum-731 214, India

*e-mail: kkpandeystat@gmail.com

(Received: January 10, 2016; Revised received: August 29, 2016;Accepted: September 04, 2016)

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Abstract: The present study has been carried out for the development of pre-harvest forecast model of rice at district level on the basis of weather variables. Weekly data of 14 meteorological weeks on seven weather variables under rice crop season over a span of 21years period (1989-90 to 2009-10) have been used along with the annual rice production data for Faizabad district of eastern Uttar Pradesh. Generated weather variable (56 weighted, unweighted and joint +1 Time trend) has used under the stepwise regression to screen out the important weather variables and multiple regression approach was subsequently employed to estimate model parameters. Q140 (unweighted interaction between maximum temperature and rainfall and Q451 (Weighted interaction between rainfall and Wind velocity) and time trend comes out to be most significant weather variables for forecasting of rice yield. The proposed model contains combination of weighted and unweighted weather variables and explains 76% (significant at 1% level of significance) of the variability of rice production in terms of R2. The model has been developed for 19 years data and validated for 2 years data. Predicted yield for the 2009 is 23.765 and 2010 is 24.31 with deviation 0.021% and -5.69 % respectively, RMSE (1.498) for the model is also calculated for the validation.

Key words: Generated weather variables, RMSE, Stepwise regression, Time trend

390

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1373-1375 (2016)

Effect of different agro-techniques on weed control efficiency, yield and nutrient uptake in potato crop

C.K. Chandrakar*1, G.K. Shrivastava2, D. Sharma2, S.K. Dwivedi2, K.K. Pandey2 and A.K. Thakur2

1Agronomy, AICRP on Integrated Farming System-On Farm Research, Sant Kabir College of Agriculture and Research Station, Kawardha- 491995, India; 2Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur (C.G.), India

*e-mail: chandreshchandrakar@gmail.com

(Received: February 02, 2016; Revised received: August 28, 2016;Accepted: September 03, 2016)

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Abstract: The experiment has been conducted during the Rabi season in potato crops (Solanum tuberosum). Irrigation (three treatments) as a main plot, weed management (four treatments) as a sub plot and Integrated Nutrient Management (INM) (four treatments) has been taken as sub-sub plot in the spacing of 60x20cm on the variety Chipsona-2. Total combined plots were 3x4x4x3=144.The result revealed that the higher and significant yield attribute, yield and nutrient uptake has been found under the 75% N (inorganic) + 25% N (poultry manure) + PSB + Azotobactor in sub-sub plot, the herbicide metribuzin found most efficient and effective than the other herbicide i.e. under sub plot. Drip irrigation has been found significant than other method of Irrigation; on the different parameter of growth, yield and yield attributes as well. The recommendation of the study is Kufri Chipsona-2 is best variety under drip irrigation, 75% N (inorganic) + 25% N (poultry manure) + PSB + Azotobactor on Metribuzin (500g ai ha-1) with the spacing of 60x20 cm for the plains of Chhattisgarh.

Key words: Potato, Drip irrigation, Nutrient management, Weed management etc.

391

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1376-1379 (2016)

Genetic variability in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.)

Sandeep Kumar Gupta and G.C. Yadav*

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: gcy1972@gmail.com

(Received: February 18, 2016; Revised received: August 27, 2016;Accepted: September 01, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The present investigation was during Kharif 2012, with objectives to assess variability, heritability and genetic advance for quantitative characters Experimental material for the study was consisted of 46 genotypes of eggplant pertaining to four groups including five checks (Arka Nidhi, NDB-2, SM-6-6 Pant Rituraj and KS-224). The experiment was conducted in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications. Each treatment consisted of 20 plants in two rows, having spacing of 60x45cm with net plot size of 4.5x1.2m2. Observations were recorded on 11 quantitative characters viz., days to 50% flowering, primary branches per plant, plant height (cm), fruit weight (g), fruit circumference (cm), flowers per inflorescence, fruit length (cm), fruits per plant, marketable fruit yield per plant (kg), unmarketable fruit yield per plant (kg) and total fruit yield per plant (kg).The analysis of variance for the design of experiment indicated highly significant differences among the genotypes for all the traits. Based on mean performance of genotypes NDB-216 for long purple and NDB-252 for round purple fruit were found as most promising genotypes for total fruit yield per plant. High magnitude of variability (GCV and PCV) was observed in case of unmarketable fruit yield per plant followed by fruit circumference, marketable fruit yield per plant, fruits per plant, total fruit yield per plant and primary branches per plant. Days to 50% flowering exhibited low value of variability. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance in percent of mean were recorded for fruit circumference, fruit length, fruit weight, primary branches per plant, total fruit yield per plant and marketable fruit yield per plant indicating opportunity for selection response.

Key words: Brinjal or egg plant (Solanum melongena L.), GCV, PCV, Heritability, Genetic advance

392

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1380-1384 (2016)

Uptake of primary and secondary nutrients in sorghum underirrigation with different qualities of water

Korla Aditya Chowdary*, Makam Umadevi, Veeramalla Ramulu and Kodary Avil Kumar

Water Technology Centre, College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, India

*e-mail: adi.001agri@gmail.com

(Received: November 09, 2015; Revised received: August 09, 2016;Accepted: August 14, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The progressive decrease of fresh water resources is leading towards the inevitable use of saline water for irrigation purpose. With using saline waters for irrigation, there is need to undertake appropriate management practices to prevent the development of excessive soil salinization for crop production. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of saline water irrigation and management practices on uptake of primary and secondary nutrients. At harvest, the significantly highest total N, K, S and Mg uptake was recorded by C2-FYM, followed by C3-FYM and C3/C4-FYM. Regarding P and Ca total uptake, among water quality levels, the significantly highest uptake was recorded by C2 water followed by C3 water and alternate irrigation with C3/C4 water. Among management practices, significantly the highest total P and Ca uptake was recorded by FYM application, followed by green manure treatment. However, the interaction effect was found to be non significant in case of P and Ca uptake.

Key words: Saline water, Water quality, Management practices, Nutrient uptake

393

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1385-1387 (2016)

Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizer on vegetative growth, fruit yield and quality of strawberry (fragaria x ananassa Duch.)

Garima Gupta*, Mahendra Bairwa, Sandeep Singh, V.M. Prasad and Suresh Chand Yadav

Department of Horticulture, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Allahabad- 211 007, India

*e-mail: garimag736@gmail.com

(Received: February 27, 2016; Revised received: August 22, 2016;Accepted: August 27, 2016)

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Abstract: A field experiment was carried in randomized block design with 15 treatments in three replications on different levels of biogen, floragen, vermicompost and RDF. The results revealed that maximum plant height (24.87cm), number of leaves (13.47), plant spread (33.15cm2) and petiole length (14.73cm), were recorded in T10 (50% RDF + 50% Vermicompost + Biogen + Floragen). Vermicompost were applied at rates of 5 or 10 t ha1 supplemented with inorganic fertilizers to balance fertilizer recommendations for strawberries of 85-155-125 kg NPK ha1.

Key words:Strawberry, Biogen, Floragen, Vermicompost, NPK, Growth, Yield and Quality

394

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1388-1390 (2016)

Studies on genetic diversity in garden pea (Pisum sativum L. var. hortens)

 Deepak Kumar Gautam*, G.C. Yadav, Adesh Kumar, Devesh Pratap Singh and Avanish Kumar Yadav

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: deepakkumargautam475@gmail.com

(Received: February 16, 2016; Revised received: August 29, 2016;Accepted: September05, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The experiment was consisted of 38 early and mid-season genotypes including four checks and conducted in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications during Rabi, 2012-13. Each treatment consisted of five rows spaced 30 cm with plant to plant spacing of 10 cm covering net plot size of 3 m x 1.5 m. Observations were recorded on sixteen characters viz. days to 50% flowering (days), nodes per plant, inter nodal length (cm), nodes to first flower appearance, primary branches per plant, plant height (cm), pods per plant, pod length (cm), pod width (cm), seeds per pod, shelling(%), 100 seed weight (g), T. S.S (oBrix), pod per cluster, pod weight (g) and pod yield per plant (g).All the thirty eight genotypes were grouped into seven diverse non over lapping clusters.Cluster II had highest number of genotypes (14) followed by cluster I (10), cluster III (6), cluster V (4), cluster IV (2) and cluster VI and VII (1). The inter-cluster D2 values between cluster II and V (446.15), cluster V and VII (428.47), cluster IV and V (361.14), cluster I and VII (360.20) and cluster II and IV (318.86), were very high. The minimum inter-cluster D2 value was recorded in case of cluster VI and cluster VII (104.18). Pod yield per plant (34.57%) followed by pods per plant (20.20%) contributed maximum toward total genetic divergence in available germplasm of garden pea. Thus, there exists ample variation and as a result scope of improvement in the available germplasm of garden pea either through direct selection or hybridization followed by selection.

Key wards: Garden pea, Pisum sativum L. var. hortens, Genetic divergence and D2analysis

395

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1391-1396 (2016)

Influence of water deficit stress on morpho-physiological and biochemical traits of four medicinal plant species in Tarai region

Chandra Kanta*, Ishwar Prakash Sharma and P. B. Rao

Department of Biological Sciences, College of Basic Sciences and Humanities, G B. Pant University of

Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar-263 145, India

*e-mail: ck.pathak116@gmail.com

(Received: February 16, 2016; Revised received: August 26, 2016;Accepted: September01, 2016)

 

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Abstract: Medicinal plants are very important as they have been used for prevention or treatment of many diseases. Therefore, this study was focused on the effect of irrigation frequency [Daily (=Control), 7, 14 and 21days interval] on morpho-physiological and biochemical aspects in four different medicinal plant species viz., Cassia tora Linn., Andrographis paniculata Nees., Wedelia calendulacea Linn. and Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoniduring summer season. These parameters including plant height; number of leaves & branches; dry weight; chlorophyll, carotenoid & total protein content which were reduced significantly as increasing stress level, while proline content enhanced. Maximum height (99.00 cm) and total dry weight (14.70 gm) recorded in C. tora; number of leaves (102.66) and branches (31.33) in S. rebaudiana, while per cent reduction in aspects of height (62.95%) and total dry weight (84.83 %) was maximum in W. calendulacea; in aspect of leaves and branches in C. tora (67.24%) and S. rebaudiana (78.72%) respectively. Maximum per cent reduction in chlorophyll, carotenoid and total protein was recorded in A. paniculata (68.95%), S. rebaudiana (74.64%) and S. rebaudiana (55.70%) respectively. Thus these results indicate that such species are more susceptible/intolerant to water stress as compared to rest of the species. The per cent stimulation in proline content under 21 days watering frequency was highest in W. calendulacea (81.22%) as compared to other species. This result reveal that W. calendulacea is more stress tolerant/resistant to water stress as compared to other selected species.

Key words: Water stress, Medicinal plant, Chlorophyll, Percent stimulation, Total protein

396

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1397-1401 (2016)

Breeding potential of selected crosses for genetic improvement and assessment of polymorphism between pairs of parents differing for drought tolerance in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

Mallikarjuna, N.M.*1, Sujeet Kumar, Mohankumar, M.V.3, Rajanna, M.P.1

1Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, 2Department of plant biotechnology, 3Department of Plant Physiology,

GKVK, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore-65, India

*e-mail: sujeeticar@gmail.com

(Received: February 03, 2016; Revised received: August 30, 2016;Accepted: September 07, 2016)

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Abstract: An investigation was carried out during 2011-2012 to assess the breeding potential of three selected crosses viz., Thanu × JBT 36/14, IR-64 × IET-16348 and IR-64 × AC-39020 of F3 generation for yield and its attributes and to identify known linked simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers polymorphic to parents differing for grain yield and water use efficiency (WUE).A higher magnitude of additive genetic variance coupled with high narrow sense heritability for traits such as days to flowering (32.5), straw yield plant-1(42.17), harvest index (11.47) and grain yield plant-1(11.47) in the cross ‘IR-64 × IET-16348’ was identified as potential for identifying superior recombinant inbred lines for use directly as a cultivar after testing or can be used as a parent in generating variability. SSR markers polymorphic to parents differing in traits related to WUE and root architecture could be used in marked-assisted breeding rice for traits related to drought tolerance.

Key words: Aerobic rice, WUE, Early selection, Marker assisted selection

397

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1402-1405 (2016)

Assessment of chlorophyll meter and green seeker optical sensor in relation to yield in different methods of rice establishment and nitrogen levels

Kiran, B.O.* and Amaregouda, A.

Department of Crop Physiology, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur, India

*e-mail: kiran4714@gmail.com

(Received: January 18, 2015; Revised received: August 31, 2016;Accepted: September 07, 2016)

 

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Abstract: Rice is central to the lives of billions of people around the world. Possibly the oldest domesticated grain (10,000 years), rice is the staple food for 2.5 billion people and growing rice is the largest single use of land for producing food, covering 9% of the earth’s arable land.The study was made to understand the chlorophyll content (SPAD) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values of direct seeded (DSR) and transplanted rice (TPR) cultivation.The SPAD meter was significantly superior in variety JKPH 3333 with 125% RDN (Recommended dose of nitrogen) in both direct seeded (30.4) and transplanted rice (30.7) system at harvest. The NDVI readings at panicle initiation recorded highest in JKPH 3333 under transplanted rice (0.63) compared to direct seeded rice (0.60). Among varieties BPT-5204 and Gangavathisona at 90 DAS had relatively lower NDVI values in DSR (0.59)as compared to TPR (0.62). The relative water content at panicle initiation was more in JKPH 3333 (89.43%) at 125% RND compared to other varieties and planting methods. Among methods of planting at 125% dose of nitrogen TPR (56.29 q-1ha) recorded highest yield compared to DSR (42.97 q ha-1).At 75% and 100% nitrogen, yields were significantly lower (38.90 q ha-1 and 44.25q ha-1) under DSR compared to TPR. The study suggest that the maintenance of greenness of canopy over longer period and chlorophyll content after panicle initiation had greater influence on yields under transplanted rice cultivation to that of direct seeded rice.The study also reveals that, itis important to maintain the critical amount of plant nitrogen throughout the vegetative and reproductive phases for better yields in direct seeded rice.

Key words: Direct seeded rice, Transplanted rice, Normalized difference vegetation index and SPAD

398

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1406-1408 (2016)

Evaluation of guava cultivars for quality pulp production

Anupam Tiwari, A.K. Pal, S.P. Singh, Sarvesh Singh*, Bijendra Kumar Singh and Priyanka Singh

Department of Horticulture, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, India

*e-mail: sarbhu1@gmail.com

(Received: February 26, 2016; Revised received: August 23, 2016;Accepted: September 01, 2016)

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Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the different guava cultivars for quality pulp production during the year 2012-2013. Mature and ripe fruits of five recognized cultivars (Lucknow–49, Allahabad Safeda, Lalit, Gorakh Bilas Pasand and Shweta) and market sample of guava were selected for experiment. The pulp prepared from guava variety Lucknow-49 recorded maximum Vitamin C (200.67 mg/100g), pH (5.41), total soluble solids (12.73 0Brix) and TSS/Acid ratio (27.10) with highest organoleptic score (8.15 out of nine) at initial days of storage. The acidity and TSS followed increasing trend, while ascorbic acid, pH, TSS/acid ratio and organoleptic score showed decreasing trend during two months of storage at room temperature.

Key words: Guava, Pulp, Organoleptic, Lucknow-49 and Ascorbic acid

399

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1409-1412 (2016)

Effect of different growth regulators and growing media on survival of air-layers in rose apple (Syzygium jambos L.)

Khandade Suresh*1, Thippesha, D.1, Thippeshappa, G.N.2

1Department of fruit science, College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Chickmagalur-577 132, India

2University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Navule, Shivamogga-577 216, India

*e-mail: khandadesureshreddy@gmail.com

(Received: February 02, 2016; Revised received: August 25, 2016;Accepted: September 02, 2016)

 

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Abstract: The study was conducted to know the effect of different growth regulators and growing media on survival of air layers in rose apple. The results revealed that among the different media, the length of roots (16.49 cm), number of primary roots (8.40), root diameter(3.83 mm), percentage survival (84%) of air layers in the media comprising soil, sand and vermicompost (1:1:2), number of secondary roots (42.27) in soil, sand and FYM (1:1:2). The air layers raised under control (soil) recorded significantly minimum values in respect of all parameters. Among the growth regulators with or without 1, 2, 4 acid treated air layers, maximum length of roots (15.66 cm), number of primary roots (8.40), number of secondary roots (41.97), root diameter (3.81 mm) were recorded in (GR1) 5000 ppm of IBA + 1000 ppm 1, 2, 4 acid. Whereas, The maximum survival percentage (80.40%) of air layers was observed in (GR2) IBA 8000 ppm + 1, 2, 4 acid 1000 ppm. The minimum was noticed in (GR5) IBA + NAA 5000 ppm in all the parameters. The interaction of different media and growth regulators with or without 1, 2, 4 acid treated air layers, the maximum number of secondary roots(48.13) in (GM2) soil, sand and FYM (1:1:2) with (GR1) IBA 5000 ppm + 1, 2, 4 acid 1000 ppm, root diameter(4.00 mm) of layers in (GM4) soil, sand and vermicompost (1:1:2) with (GR1) IBA 8000 ppm + 1, 2, 4 acid 1000 ppm, survival percentage (94.67%) in (GM4) soil, sand and vermicompost (1:1:2) with (GR2) IBA 8000 ppm + 1, 2, 4 acid 1000 ppm.

Key words: Air-layering, Growth regulators, Growing media, Survival, Rose apple

400

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1413-1415 (2016)

Studies on variability, heritability and genetic advance in some quantitative characters in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Coss.]

Sanjeev Kumar1, P.N. Verma*, Bharat Bhushan, V.P. Rahul andK. Kumar

Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

*e-mail: prem.verma124@gmail.com

(Received: September 23, 2015; Revised received: August 22, 2016;Accepted:August 26, 2016)

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Abstract: Ten genotypes and their forty five crosses of Mustard were evaluated in Randomized Block Design (RBD) with three replications for yield and yield contributing traits during 2011-2012 to find out genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance in per cent of mean. Analysis of variance for the design of experiment showed significant for all the twelve characters. The magnitude of phenotypic coefficient of variation was higher than genotypic coefficient of variation for all the characters in both timely sown (E1) and late sown (E2) conditions. The higher estimates of phenotypic coefficient of variation (>20%) were recorded for number of secondary branches per plant in both timely sown (E1) and late sown (E2) conditions and GCV and ECV was high for this character in timely sown (E1), while number of primary branches per plant in timely sown (E1).The high heritability estimates in narrow sense were recorded for days to 50% flowering, days to maturity and 1000-seed weight, in E1 and E2 while oil content only in E1. Genetic advance in per cent of mean was found to be high for secondary branches per plant (26.84%,26.82%), number of siliquae on main raceme (24.36%,22.69%) 1000-seed weight (28.09%,41.77%), biological yield/plant (32.33%,32.65%), seed yield per plant (30.92%,26.28%) and harvest index (23.04%,20.76%) in E1 and E2 conditions.

Kew words: Variability, Heritability genetic advance, Quantitative characters in Indian mustard

401

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1416-1422 (2016)

Analysis of genetic parameters and characters association for yield components and quality attributes in rice cultivars

Gaurav Kamboj1, Pradeep Kumar*2, Ravi Kumar1, Sandeep Kumar1 and Devi Singh1

1Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Meerut-250 110, India

2Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal-132 001, India

*e-mail: pradeeptaliyan231@gmail.com

(Received: February 03, 2016; Revised received: August 27, 2016;Accepted: September 09, 2016)

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Abstract: Genetic analysis was carried out for 55 diverse rice genotypes (10 parents and 45 F1s) through half-diallel mating design during kharif season 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. The analysis of variance showed highly significant differences among the treatments for all the 19 traits under study. High heritability (broad sense) coupled with high genetic advance was observed for number of grains per panicle, harvest index, grain yield per plant, productive tillers per plant, plant height, biological yield per plant, kernel length after cooking indicating selection will be 100 percent effective based on these traits because they were under the influence of additive and additive x additive type of gene action. Highest coefficient of variation (GCV & PCV) was recorded for plant height (13.85 % & 13.87 %), productive tillers per plant (14.58 % &15.13%), number of grains per panicle (17.93 % &18.07 %), biological yield per plant (12.67 % & 12.71 %), grain yield per plant (15.88 % & 15 97 %), harvest index (16.80 % & 16.90 %) and kernel length after cooking (10.09 % & 10.19 %), indicating that these traits are under the major influence of genetic control. The traits, panicle length (gr=0.31** & pr=0.30**), number of grain per panicle (gr=0.80** & pr=0.79** ), biological yield per plant (gr=0.31** & pr=0.30** ) and harvest index (gr=0.67** & pr=0.67** ) had positiveand significant correlation with grain yield per plant and these traits also had highest positive direct effects on grain yield therefore the above mentioned traits contributed maximum to higher grain yield compared to other traits indicating that we can improve grain yield by improving these traits as well as emphasis should be given based on these traits for the selection of elite genotypes from the segregating generation.

Key words: Rice, Diallel analysis, Genetic parameters, Yield components and Quality attributes

402

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1423-1424 (2016)

Evaluation of China aster (Callistephus chinensis Nees) cultivars for yield and quality parameters under hill zone of Karnataka

Savitha, K.H., V. Srinivasa, Suresh Chougalaand Jeevan, U.

Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, College of Horticulture, Mudigere, India

*e-mail: savitakh94@gmail.com

(Received: February 15, 2016; Revised received: September 02, 2016;Accepted: September 08, 2016)

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Abstract: Studies on different cultivars of China aster for flower yield and flower quality parameters showed significant differences. Among the nine cultivars maximum number of flowers per plant was recorded in cultivar Phule Ganesh Violet (57.27), while these were least in cultivar Budiguppa Local (43.93). The flower yield and seed yield per plant was recorded highest in cultivar Phule Ganesh White (308.68 g and 8.70 g, respectively) whereas, least flower yield and seed yield per plant was noticed by cultivar Budiguppa Local (98.45 g and 2.29 g, respectively). Fresh weight, dry weight and diameter of flower were maximum in cv. Phule Ganesh White (5.70 g, 0.81 g and 6.80 cm, respectively) and were found to be superior over other cultivars.

Key words: China aster, Cultivar, Yield and quality

403

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1425-1426 (2016)

Influence of nutrient levels on growth, yield and quality of elite genotypes of makoi (Solanum nigrum L.)

Ramesha, J.L., Sreeramu, B.S., Savitha, K.H. and Manjula, V.

Division of Horticulture, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bengaluru-560 065, India

*e-mail: savitakh94@gmail.com

(Received: January 28, 2016; Revised received: September 02, 2016;Accepted: September 06, 2016)

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Abstract: The experiment consisted of fifteen treatment combinations involving three genotypes and five levels of fertilizer. Among the genotypes, the maximum total alkaloid content and alkaloid yield was recorded in G1- MG-1 (0.88% and 62.29 kg ha-1) while, it was minimum (0.36% and 23.51 kg ha-1) in G3-MG-14.The interaction between genotypes and fertilizer levels did not show any significant influence on plant height, leaf area per plant and number of branches at all the three stages of plant growth. Among the interactions of genotypes and fertilizer levels, G1F2 (MG-1 and125: 75: 75 Kg NPK ha-1 + FYM @10t ha-1) recorded the highest dry herbage yield per plant and per hectare.

Key words: Makoi, Solanaceae, Genotype, Fertilizer, Alkaloid

404

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (11) 1427-1430 (2016)

Heterosis and combining ability analysis for productivity traits in ridge gourd [Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb.]

Shivanand Koppad*1, Mukesh Chavan2, Jyoti Patil, R.C. Jagadeesha and Shantappa T.

Department of Crop Improvement and Biotechnology, University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot-591 310,

KR College of Horticulture, Arabhavi, Tq. Gokak, District Belagavi, India

*e-mail: shivu.643@gmail.com

(Received: January 23, 2016; Revised received: September 03, 2016;Accepted: September 06, 2016)

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Abstract: The Line x Tester analysis was done with six lines and four testers of ridge gourd to study the heterosis and combining ability effects for growth, yield and yield attributing traits. The lines found to be good general combiners were L4 (12.18) and L5 (11.56) for vine length; L4 for number of branches (0.54) and number of leaves per vine (6.42), total chlorophyll content (0.05), average fruit weight (20.49), proline content (12.91), leaf area (41.61) and total fruit yield per vine (139.24); L3 (-4.82) and L4 (-2.60) for days to 50% flowering and days to first harvest. The best specific combiner for vine length was L5 x T2 (33.69). For numbers of leaves (6.32) and leaf area (41.82) the specific combiner was L4 x T2. The hybrid L2 x T4 was earliest as it was specific combiner for days to 50% flowering (-3.53). Highly positive significant heterosis was observed for number fruits per vine (25.00%), total chlorophyll content of leaf (84.01%), leaf area (235.07%) and total fruit yield per vine (58.5%). Highly negative significant heterosis was observed with the days to 50% flowering (-15.38%) over the better parents. Three hybrids possessed significantly useful heterobeltiosis for fruit weight.

Key words: Better parent, Ridge gourd, Combining ability, Heterosis, Leaf area

 

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