RESEARCH IN ENVIRONMENT AND LIFE SCIENCES

Volume-9, Number-2, February-2016

 

39

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)131-133 (2016)

 

Influence of diatomaceous earth as a source of silicon on growth and yield of banana in the northern zone of the Karnataka

 

Kumbargire, G. A*., Swamy, G. S. K. and Shafeeq Bawoor

Dept. of Fruit Science, Kittur Rani Channamma College of Horticulture, Arabhavi, Gokak, Belgaum – 591 218, India

*e-mail: kumbaragire0534@gmail.com

(Received: June 11, 2015; Revised received: November 20, 2015;Accepted: November 24, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Experiment was conducted to know the response of diatomaceous earth (DE)as a source of silicon on growth and yield of banana. Among the different levels ofDE, application of 750 kg/ha of DE with recommended dose of fertilizers (RDF) recorded the maximum pseudostem height (196.67 cm), pseudostem diameter (21.67cm), number of leaves (21.25), leaf area (13.31 m2), fastest rate of leaf production (8.50), total chlorophyll content (2.32 and 2.41 mg/g at six months and at the time of shooting respectively), yield attributing characters like finger length (20.03 cm), fingers diameter (3.85 cm), number of hands per bunch (11.13), number of fingers per bunch (195.38) and bunch weight (26.67 kg).

Key words: Banana, Silica, Recommended dose of fertilizers

 

40

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)134-136 (2016)

 

Organic recycling – A new approach for nutrient management in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.)

 

Nagaraj Gokavi*1, Sudharani N.2, Sunilkumar M. K.1, Ravi Y. Ravi Pujari1 and Akshay K.R.3

1Kittur Rani Channamma College of Horticulture, Arabavi, UHS, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India

2KVK, Chitradurga, UAHS, Shivamogga, Karnataka, India; 3Deprt. Horticulture, Chikkamagalur, Karnataka, India

*e-mail: naguhorticos@gmail.com

(Received: March 24, 2015; Revised received: November 17, 2015;Accepted: November 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The decline in productivity has been attributed to factors, such as decrease in soil organic matter content, water holding capacity, loss of physical properties, and number and activity of soil flora and fauna. The plantation sector is constrained by the unstable prices of commodities and increase in the cost of production. Under such a situation, a re-orientation of strategies is required to develop production systems that are agriculturally sustainable, economically viable and environmentally sound. The maintenance and conservation of soil fertility is an integral component of agricultural sustainability, which can be achieved through appropriate management of organic resources available in the ecosystem in plenty. Recycling of vast resources of crop residues containing appreciable quantity of nutrients, produced by plantation crops, offer new avenues for nutrient management in plantation crops and cropping systems.

Key words: Coconut, Nutrient management, Organic recycling

 

41

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)137-139 (2016)

 

Bioefficacy of some indigenous products and spinosad in the managementof okra shoot and fruit borer (Earias vittella Fabricius)

 

Abhishek Kumar Chaudhary*1, Ashwani Kumar2,Umesh Chandra1 and Rahul Singh3

 1Department of Entomology, 3Deptartmentof Extenson Education, N.D.U.A.&T., Faizabad-224 229, India

2Deptartment of Entomology Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology & Sciences, Allahabad-211007, India

*e-mail: abhichaudhary15@gmail.com

(Received: April 08, 2015; Revised received: December 04, 2015;Accepted: December 08, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) is cultivated through out the year but summer and kharif are the favorable season for its cultivation. The major insect of shoot and fruit borer (Earias vittella Fabricius) is a major pest of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) effect direct loss in marketable fruit. Present investigation is being undertaken to evulate bioefficacy of indigenous products and spinosad 45 SC material in the management of okra shoot and fruit borer (Earias vittella Fabricius) in research form of Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology & Science Allahabad duringkharif season 2012. The indigenous products and chemical insecticide are use to reduce the fruit damage like neem oil 1%, NSKE 5%, Tobacco leaf extract 2%, Cow urine 10ml, Cow butter milk 30 ml, karanj oil 0.015 % , and spinosad insecticide 45 SC 1%. The highest suppression of shoot infestation was Spinosad 3.32, and lowest, followed by Neem Oil 4.47,NSKE 4.63, Karanj Oil 4.90, Tobacco leaf extract 6.03, Cow Urine 6.90 and Cow Butter Milk 7.16 compared to untreated control 8.14. The fruit damage reduction percentage was Spinosad 45 SC 14.57 followed by NSKE 18.79, Neem Oil 19.28, Karanj Oil 20.92, Tobacco leaf extract 22.75, Cow Urine 29.25 and Cow Butter Milk 29.37 effective treatments compared by control 37.14.

Key words-, Earias vittella, Abelmoschus esculentus, Indigenous products spinosad 45Sc

 

 

42

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)140-142 (2016)

 

Importance of medicinal plants in the treatment of

central nervous system disorders - A review

 

Ravi Y.*1,Suryakant K.V.1, Sudharani N.2,Nagaraj Gokavi1, Sunilkumar M. K.1 and Akshay K.R.3

 1Kittur Rani Channamma College of Horticulture, Arabavi, UHS, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India

2KVK, Chitradurga, UAHS, Shivamogga, Karnataka, India; 3Deprt. Horticulture, Chikkamagalur, Karnataka, India

*e-mail: ravinaiky@gmail.com

(Received: May 24, 2015; Revised received: December 11, 2015;Accepted: December 14, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Herbal treatment is the natural form of healing or alternative therapy, where herbs or plants are used in the form of extract, pills, syrup to cure diseases of human or it is the use of plants (herbs) to treat disease and enhance wellbeing. Herbal treatment is used to treat a range of disorders including anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, hormonal imbalance, migraines, skin problems and other disorders. Herbal medicine has its origins in ancient cultures including those of the Egyptians, Americans, Indians and Chinese. At present, thousand of plant metabolites are being successfully used for the treatment of variety of disorders. The World Health Organization estimated that 80% of people worldwide rely on herbal medicines for some part of their primary health care. Increased side effects, lack of curative treatment for several chronic diseases, high cost of new drugs, microbial resistance and emerging, diseases are some reasons for renewed public interest in plant based medicines.Some of the plants which are used in the treatment of mental disorders are sage, ginkgo, cowhage, valeriana, kava, hops, ginseng, sarpagandha, these plants and their chemical constituents are very helpful in protecting the human against central nervous system (CNS) disorders.

Keywords: CNS (mental) Disorders, Medicinal Plants, High Blood Pressure and Sarpagandha

 

 

43

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)143-145 (2016)

 

Effect of aqueous extract of Parthenium hysterophorus L. on pollen sterility of Vicia faba L.

 

Vishnu Shankar Sinha*1, Reena Mohanka2 and Nandjee Kumar3

 1P.G. Department of Botany, Tata College, Kolhan University, Chaibasa-833202, India

2Department of Botany, Patna University,Patna-800001; 3Department of Botany, Magadh University, Bodhgaya -824234, India

*e-mail: vish20nu@gmail.com

(Received: May 14, 2015; Revised received: December 14, 2015;Accepted: December 19, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present paper mainly deals with the effect of aqueous extract of Parthenium hysterophorus L. (Asteraceae) on pollen sterility of Vicia faba L. About 50 g of stem, leaf inflorescence and whole plant parts were grinded separately to get the mother solution which was further diluted to different concentrations by adding required quantity of double distilled water.Seeds of Vicia faba L. were treated with different concentrations viz. 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the extract and also with double distilled water for the control for four hours at room temperature. The treated and control seeds were sown in the experimental plots duringwinter season of 2011 to raise M1 generation with three replicates (each replicate consisted of 100 seeds). Pollen sterility was determined by staining the pollen grains with 2% aceto-carmine and mounting in 50% glycerine. The pollen sterility of the treated plants considerably varied (17.50±0.17 to 70.30±0.21) from the controlplants (03.40±0.16).The ANOVA test confirmed that the extracts of Parthenium parts significantly induced pollen sterility. It was interesting to note that the inflorescence extract was highly effective with gradual increasing doses of the extract. Further the gradation of the effectiveness of Parthenium plantpart extracts for inducing pollen sterility wasnoted as inflorescence>whole plant>Leaf >stem.

Key words: Parthenium hyterophorus, Allelopathy, Pollen sterility

 

44

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)146-148 (2016)

 

A review on cultivation ofkalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.)

 

Nagaraj Gokavi*, Ravi Pujari and Arif A. Agasimani

Kittur Rani Channamma College of Horticulture, Arabavi-591218, University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagaalkot, India

*e-mail: naguhorticos@gmail.com

(Received: January 24, 2015; Revised received: December 17, 2015;Accepted: December 19, 2015)

 

 

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Abstract: Kalmegh is one of the important ingredients in various ayurvedic preparations used for fever and liver disease, which are commonly used by ayurvedic physicians. Kalmegh was recommended in “Charak Samhita” in 175 BC for treatments of jaundice along with other plants in multi plant preparation. Kalmegh is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine against different ailments. It is reported that this plant possesses astringent, anodyne, tonic and alexipharmic properties which are useful in curing dysentery, cholera, diabetes, influenza, bronchitis, piles, hepatomegaly, skin disorder, fever and worm. The major bitter constituent in kalmegh is due to the presence of diterpene lactone called andrographolide. Looking at the utility and importance of Andrographis paniculata, an overview is conducted considering some useful aspects like, Therapeutic uses, genetic study, spacing, nutrition and harvesting studies to initiate systematic cultivation of medicinal plants in order to conserve biodiversity and protect endangered species.

Keywords: Andrographolide, Andrographis paniculata, Diabetes, Kalmegh, Therapeutic

45

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)149-151 (2016)

 

Genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance studies in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under sodic soil

 

Anant Kumar* and O.P. Verma

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Faizabad-224229, India

*e-mail: nntkmr3@gmail.com

(Received: April 20, 2015; Revised received: December 04, 2015;Accepted: December 08, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present study was carried out to estimate genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance and for some yield and its contributing characters such as days to 50% flowering,panicle lenth, plant height, spikelets panicle-1, spikelets fertility (%), biological yield plant-1, grain yield plant-1, harvest index, and L/B ratio. The high estimate of heritability in broad sense was recorded for majority of the characters. High estimates of heritability in narrow sense were recorded for days to maturity, days to 50% flowering andplant height. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance was observed for 1000-grain weight, grain yield/plant, days to 50% flowering, spikelet/penicle, days to maturity and L/B ratio. Indicating the involvement of additive gene action. Hence, any basis should be given to select these traits the productivity level under salt affected soil.

Keywords: Genetic variability, Heritability, Genetic advance, Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

 

46

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)152-153 (2016)

 

Effect of different sources of potassium on yield attributing characters of guava in rainy season crop

 

Abhishek Singh*, A.L. Yadav and Amar Singh

Department of Horticulture, N.D. University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad- 224 229, India

*e-mail: abhisheksingh5590@gmail.com

(Received: April 03, 2015; Revised received: December 05, 2015;Accepted: December 08, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present investigation was carried out at Main Experiment Station, Department of Horticulture, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Narendra Nagar (Kumarganj), Faizabad- 224 229 (U.P.) during the year 2013-2014. The experiment was carried out on Uniform plants of guava (Psidium guajava L.) cv. Lucknow 49. The experiment was conducted in Randomize block Design with 7 treatments and 3 replication considering two plants as a unit per treatment. The observations were conducted for yield attributing characters of guava fruits. Observations recorded with respect to maximum number of fruit retention, size, weight, volume and yield with decrease fruit drop was obtained with the foliar application of potassium sulphate @ 1.0%, followed by potassium nitrate @ 1.0%, while minimum value of all attributing characters with maximum fruit drop was recorded under control.

Keyword: Potassium Sulphate, Fruit size, Fruit weight, Fruit volume and Yield

 

 

47

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 154-159 (2016)

 

Comparative diversity analysis of morphological traits

in maize inbred lines using RAPD, SSR markers

 

Ashutosh Singh*, PavankumarJingade and R.L. Ravikumar

Department of Plant Biotechnology, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore 560 065, India

*e-mail: singh.ashutosh026@gmail.com

(Received: May 29, 2015; Revised received: December 11,2015;Accepted: December 15, 2015)

 

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Abstract:Fourteen maize inbred lines were used for molecular diversity analysis using 11 RAPD and 25 SSR primers. The inbred lines were divided into two main clusters based on marker data suggesting the presence of diversity at DNA level. Further diversity based on morphological traits across two seasons kharif and rabi 2013 was studied. In 2013 kharif the inbred lines were grouped into seven clusters out of which five were solitary and in 2013rabi the inbred lines were grouped into five clusters with two being solitary. The consistency of cluster pattern based morphological diversity ofthe genotypes across seasons was compared with grouping of inbred lines obtained using molecular markers which indicating genetic distance at DNA level. Comparison of clustering pattern obtained by using molecular markers and morphological characters showed less similarity.

Key words: Maize; Genetic diversity; Morphological diversity

 

 

48

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)160-162 (2016)

 

Correlation studies in african marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) genotypes

 

Shivakumar*1, Sowmya Kumari3, Ketana, G.B.1, Vinay, G.M.3, Srinivasa, V.2 and Praneeth, Y.S.3

1Department of floriculture, 2Department of Vegetable science, college of Horticulture, Mudigere; 3college of Horticulture, Bangalore, India

*e-mail: manjanshivakumar@gmail.com

(Received: May 26, 2015; Revised received: December 12,2015;Accepted: December 18, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field investigation on correlation analysis was carried out to understand the association between component characters and their relative contribution to xanthophyll content to bring about a rational improvement in the desirable direction during rabi season fifteen diverse genotypes of African marigold The 19 characters related to growth, flowering, and xanthophyll content revealed that, the genotypic and phenotypic correlation of xanthophyll content was positively significant with petal meal yield per hectare, flower yield per plant, number of petals per flower, flower weight, flower diameter, number of flower per plant,flowering duration, day to 50 per cent flowering, day to first flower bud initiation, internodal length, secondary branches, primary branches, number of leaves, plant height during rabi season.

Key words: Marigold, Genotypes, Correlation

 

49

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)163-165 (2016)

 

Characterization of grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] for root traits associated with droughttolerance

 

P. Priya*1, V.C. Patil2 and B.N. Aravind Kumar3

1Department of Agronomy, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore - 560 065, Karnataka, India

2PARC, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh - 11451, Saudi Arabia

3Department of Agronomy, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad - 580 005, Karnataka, India

*e-mail: prponnuswamy@gmail.com

(Received: April 08, 2015; Revised received: December 15,2015;Accepted: December 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: In the present investigation, during initial stages (30 and 60 DAS) of crop growth, hydro-priming (0.21), bio-priming (0.33 and 0.24) and combination of all priming methods (0.27) and at later stage (90 DAS) only combination of all priming methods (0.27) recorded significantly higher root:shoot ratio as compared to farmers’ practice. In the present study, priming treatments did not show any impact on root length at initial stages due to receipt of well distributed rainfall. In contrast, at 60 DAS combination of all priming methods recorded significantly higher root dry weight (12.69 g plant-1) and increased to the tune of 9.8 per cent over farmers’ practice (unprimed seeds) (11.69 g plant-1). Interaction effect of root:shoot ratio of sorghum indicated that. at 30 DAS, highest root: shoot ratio was recorded in osmopriming (0.54) and biopriming (0.43) in sole cropping system. At 60 DAS, in sole cropping, hydropriming (0.27) and combination of all priming methods (0.27) was beneficial. In intercropping, biopriming (0.27) and combination of all priming methods (0.27) was beneficial. At 90 DAS, in sole cropping, combination of all priming methods (0.30) was advantageous as compared to rest of the treatment combinations.

Key words: Seed priming, Drought, Root characteristics, Cropping systems, Sorghum

 

50

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)166-169(2016)

 

Cultivation practices and production constraints of maize under rainfed conditions

 

P. Priya*1, V.C. Patil2 and B.N. Aravind Kumar3

1Department of Agronomy, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore - 560 065, Karnataka, India

2PARC, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh - 11451, Saudi Arabia

3Department of Agronomy, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad - 580 005, Karnataka, India

*e-mail: prponnuswamy@gmail.com

(Received: April 08, 2015; Revised received: December 15,2015;Accepted: December 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: In the study it was revealed that, 74.55 per cent of farmers have used above recommended seed rate (15 kg ha-1). Majority of the farmers (69.09 %) have followed below recommended spacing (45 cm x 30 cm). The survey data on the usage of fertilizer indicated that, majority of the farmers have used above recommended dose of N, P and K and only 29.09 per cent of farmers have used farmyard manure. The quantity of manures applied indicated that 76.36 per cent of farmers have used < 7.5 t ha-1 and the quantity of manures applied appears to be less than the recommended dose (7.5 t ha-1). Majority of the farmers (46.36 %) have harvested lower yield (20 to 40 q ha-1) than the potential yield of maize in the study area. The major reasons attributed to the low yields are: erratic and scanty rainfall, lack of proper soil moisture conservation practices, lack of suitable management techniques to combat moisture stress, lack of good seed availability, scarcity of labour and lack of information on new method of cultivation. Due to these reasons the majority of the farmers (83.64 %) were experienced yield loss to the extent of 51-75 %.

Key words: Maize, Production constraints, Cultivation practices, Moisture stress

 

 

51

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)170-172(2016)

 

Studies on variability analysis for yield and yield attributes of garden pea (Pisum sativum L. var hortense)

 

 Deepak Kumar Gautam*, G.C. Yadav, Amar Singh and Satish Yadav

1Department of Vegetable Science and Horticulture, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: deepakkumargautam475@gmail.com

(Received: March 03, 2015; Revised received: December 18,2015;Accepted: December 24, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Experimental material for study was consisted of 38 early and mid-season genotypes including four checks (AP-3, VRP-6, PC-531 and VRP-7).The experiment was conducted in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications. Each treatment consisted of five rows spaced 30cm with plant to plant spacing of 10 cm and replicated thrice. Each entries were grown in the plot size of3 m x 1.5 m. Observations were recorded on sixteen character viz. days to 50 percent flowering (days), nodes per plant, internodal length (cm), nodes to first flower appearance, primary branches per plant, plant height (cm), pods per plant, pod length (cm), pod width(cm, seeds per pod, shelling per cent (%), 100 seed weight (g), T. S.S (oBrix), pod per cluster, pod weight (g), and pod yield per plant (g). The analysis of variance for design of experiment indicated highly significant differences among the genotypes for all the traits. Based on mean performance only one genotype NDVP-424 among early group and seven genotypes viz. NDVP-517 followed by NDVP-521, NDVP-522, NDVP-503, NDVP-516, NDVP-512 and NDVP-502 among mid-season group were found as significant and most promising genotypes for pod yield per plant along with some other traits. The estimates of phenotypic coefficients of variation (PCV) were higher than genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) for all the traits. High magnitudes of variability were observed in case of pods per cluster (28.99%), plant height (26.03%), pods per plant (25.08), primary branches per plant (22.70%), pod yield per plant (21.83%), pod weight (21.67%).While, TSS, width of pod, 100 seed weight, shelling per cent and seed per pod exhibited low variability. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance in per cent of mean were estimated for plant height, pods per plant, pod yield per plant, pod weight, nodes per plant, nodes to first flower appearance, primary branches per plant, days to 50 per cent flowering, internodal length, length of pod, 100 seed weight and TSS which indicated opportunity for selection response

Key wards: Garden pea, GCV, PCV, Heritability, Genetic advance

 

52

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)173-175 (2016)

 

Studies on correlation and path coefficient analysis

in garden pea (Pisum sativum L. var hortense)

 

 Deepak Kumar Gautam*, G.C. Yadav, Amar Singh and Satish Yadav

1Department of Vegetable Science and Horticulture, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: deepakkumargautam475@gmail.com

(Received: March 03, 2015; Revised received: December 18,2015;Accepted: December 24, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Experimental material for study was consisted of 38 early and mid-season genotypes including four checks (AP-3, VRP-6, PC-531 and VRP-7). The most important trait, pod yield per plant had exhibited highly significant and positive phenotypic correlation with nodes to first flower appearance, nodes per plant, pod width, plant height, days to 50% flowering, seed per plant and pods per plant, TSS and pods per cluster while it showed highly significant and negative correlation with seed per pod, pod weight and length of pod. The higher magnitude of positive direct effect on pod yield was exerted by number of nodes per plant followed by internodal length, primary branches per plant, and nodes to first flower appearance, TSS and plant height. The higher magnitude of negative direct effect on pod yield was exerted by number of seeds per pod followed by pod weight, length of pod and width of pod. . The higher magnitude of positive direct effect on pod yield was exerted by number of nodes per plant (0.2312) followed by internodal length (0.1523), primary branches per plant (0.1470), nodes to first flower appearance (0.1461), TSS (0.1392) and plant height (0.0999). The higher magnitude of negative direct effect on pod yield was exerted by number of seeds per pod (-0.3356) followed by pod weight (-0.1385), length of pod (-0.1316) and width of pod (-0.1021).

Key wards: Correlation studies, Garden pea, Path analysis

 

 

53

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)176-178 (2016)

 

Performance of spices in dry land eco-system

 

 Rajiv* and K.P. Singh

Department of Vegetable Science, C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 024, India

*e-mail: rajiv.agro69@gmail.com

(Received: June 03, 2015; Revised received: December 19,2015;Accepted: December 24, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Integrated Crop Technology (ICT) based demonstrations were conducted on spices with improved technologies against farmers practices on farmer’s fields. The demonstrations were conducted on onion (320), garlic (205) and red chillies (570). The results showed that improved techniques increased yield over farmers practices by the margins of 113.54 q/ha or 76.24 % in onion, 39.76 q/ha or 45.98 % in garlic and 21.89 q/ha or 43.54 % in red chillies. Net economic gain of Rs. 99537/ha in onion followed by Rs. 81222/ha in garlic realized by farmers. Lowest of Rs. 63292/ha net profit was increased in red chillies. There was wide technology gap, which need to bridge by promoting the scientific production and protection technologies of spices crops in Hamirpur district of Uttar Pradesh.

Key Words: Spices demonstrations, Spices productivity and profitability, Technology gap analysis

 

54

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 179-180 (2016)

 

Studied on physico-chemical characteristics of different cultivars of litchi fruits grown under West Bengal region

 

 Balveer Singh*, Ivi Chakarborty, Dombewarisa S. Marak and Arun Kumar Patel

Department of Post Harvest Technology of Horticultural Crops, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswa Vidyalaya, Nadia, India

*e-mail: balveer048@gmail.com

(Received: March 14, 2015; Revised received: December 22,2015;Accepted: December 26, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) is an evergreen fruit tree native to South China. The food value of litchi lies in its sugar content, which ranges from 7 to 21% depending on climate and cultivars. The experiment was conducted for physico-chemical composition of six cultivars of litchi namely Kasba, Bombai, Elaichi, Deshi, China and Muzaffarpur of litchi fruit in completely randomized block design using ten fruits per replication. The parameters which were assessed were fruit weight, fruit size (length and diameter), seed length, peel per cent, volume, pulp per cent, pH, seed per cent, seed weight, pulp weight, seed diameter, pulp: seed ratio, peel weight, juice content, specific gravity, TSS, titratable acidity, ascorbic acid, reducing non-reducing and total sugars, TSS: acid ratio and total sugar: acid ratio. The result indicated that cultivar China and Bombai were good quality fruits, hence preferred for preparation of non alcoholic beverages.

Key words: Litchi, Nutritive value, Juice content and Sugar

 

 

55

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)181-184 (2016)

 

Assessment of good combiners in tomato on basis of

qualities of fruits against high temperature

 

 Rashmi Singh1, 2, N. Rai*1, R. K. Singh1 and Ganesh Singh2

1Division of Crop Improvement and Biotechnology, ICAR-Indian Institute of Vegetable Research (IIVR), P.B. No.-01, Varanasi-221305, India

2Department of Horticulture, Udai Pratap Autonomous Post Graduate Institution, Bhojubir, Varanasi-221002, India

*e-mail: nrai1964@gmail.com

(Received: April 19, 2015; Revised received: December 25,2015;Accepted: December 28, 2015)

 

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Abstract: This study was conducted during summer season for estimation of good combiners on the basis of fruit qualities against high temperature. A breeding program was developed between nine parents by using half-diallel mating design in tomato and produced 36 F1 hybrids. Among the parents Riogrande, Suncherry, Superbug and H-24 exhibited good general combining ability (GCA) and high performance for fruit quality characters viz., pericarp thickness, number of locules per fruit, total soluble solids, lycopene content, self life of tomato fruits, ascorbic acid, and titrable acidity against high temperature. Out of 36 crosses the cross combinations Punjab Chhuhara x Suncherry, Punjab Chhuharax Pusa Sadabahar, Superbug x Pusa Sadabahar, Pusa Sadabahar x IIHR-2201 and Suncherry x Superbug were high specific combining ability (SCA) estimates for high TSS, titrable acidity, ascorbic acid, lycopene and shelf life of tomato fruits in high temperature. Highly significant parents and crosses indicated to both additive and non–additive gene action for both general and specific combining ability. Hence these combiners could be effectively utilized in tomato breeding program for developing high fruit quality of resistant/tolerant tomato varieties against high temperature and can be freely cultivated in summer season.

Keywords: S. lycopersicum, Quality traits, Good combiners, Summer season, Self life

 

 

56

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)185-188 (2016)

 

Effect of fertigation and mulching on physiological parameters studies in papaya

 

 P. B. Jadhav, B. V. Padhiar andD. P. Nawalkar*

Dept of Fruit Science and PSMA, ACHF, N.A.U., Navsari-396 450, India

*e-mail: dineshnawalkar@gmail.com

(Received: April 22, 2015; Revised received: December 272015;Accepted: December 30, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted with twelve treatments viz., 1st factor three levels of N and K2 @ 100, 80 and 60 % of RD (200:200:250), 2nd factor two levels of splits and 3rd factor two levels of mulching of black plastic mulch @ 20 % area coverage (50 ΅) in randomized block design with factorial concept and three replications at two locations i.e. 1) Regional Horticultural Research Farm, Navsari. 2). Fruit Research Station, Gandevi, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari (Gujarat) during 2012-13. The results indicated that the physiological parameters viz., chlorophyll content, transpiration rate and photosynthetic rate were affected due to different treatments. Higher values were recorded with fertigation level at 100% RDF treatment on 180, 270 and 360 days after transplanting of seedlings. Leaf temperature was found non-significant. The role of nitrogen and potassium on physiological characters resulting in better yield and quality

Keywords: Chlorophyll, Photosynthesis rate, Transpiration rate, Leaf Temperature, Fertigation, Mulching

 

 

57

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 189-191 (2016)

 

Evaluation of maize based vegetable crop sequences and their effects on soil fertility under mid hill conditions

 

 Ashish Kumar*, S.C. Negi, S.S Rana, S. K. Subehia and J. Shekhar

Department of Agronomy, Forages and Grassland Management, CSK, HPKV, Palampur-176061, India

*e-mail: ashish2587@hotmail.com

(Received: April 29, 2015; Revised received: December 282015;Accepted: December 30, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Eight cropping sequences viz. maize – wheat, maize (green cob) + frenchbean (pole type) – pea – summer squash, maize + soybean – garlic, maize (green cob) – broccoli – potato, maize (green cob) + asparagus bean – radish – onion, maize (green cob) + mash – cauliflower – frenchbean, maize (green cob) + ricebean – cauliflower – buckwheat, maize (green cob) + asparagus bean – broccoli – radish were evaluated for their production potential and economic feasibility under mid hill conditions of Himachal Pradesh. After completion of the experiment maize (green cob) + asparagus bean – radish – onion and maize (green cob) + frenchbean (pole type) – pea – summer squash sequences resulted in significantly higher maize equivalent yield (36.9 and 35.0 t ha-1), production efficiency (547.4 and 514.0 %). Maize (Green cob) + mash – cauliflower – French bean and Maize + soybean – garlic sequences resulted in highest LUE (92.6 and 92.3 %). Maize (Green cob) – Broccoli – potatoand Maize + asparagus bean – radish –onioncro sequences resulted in higher additional employment generation over existing maize- wheat crop sequence. Maize – wheat sequence resulted in highest nitrogen uptake; maize (green cob) + frenchbean (pole type) – pea – summer squash resulted in highest phosphorus uptake and maize (green cob) – broccoli – potato sequence resulted in highest potassium uptake. Build up of N, P and K was recorded in most of the crop sequences and especially those which involved legume as one of its component crop.

Key Words: Maize grain equivalent yield, Cropping system, Production Efficiency, Employment Generation, Legumes

 

 

58

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)192-194 (2016)

 

Effect of integrated nutrient management modules on growth and yield of high yielding varieties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under late sown condition

 

 Harikesh* , Akhtar Ali, Ravi Pratap Yadav and Sanjay Kumar

Department of Agronomy, NDUAT Kumarganj, Faizabad- 224 229, India

*e-mail: harikeshkumarup@gmail.com

(Received: April 26, 2015; Revised received: December 242015;Accepted: December 27, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Field experiment was conducted during rabi season on silt loam soil by taking twelve treatments viz. Threevarieties (Uday ,Avarodhi and Push362) and four nutrient management modules likes Control, RDF(20 kg N + 50 kg P2O5 + 0 kg K2O)+ RC (Rhizobium culture), RDF(20 kg N + 50 kg P2O5 + 0 kg K2O)+ PSB (Phosphorus solubilizing bacteria), RDF( 20 kg N + 50 kg P2O5 + 0 kg K2O)+RC +PSB .The treatments were arranged in randomized block design with three replications.The chickpea variety Avrodhi produced significantly taller plants than Uday but recorded at pat with PUSA-362 at all growth stages viz., 30, 60, 90 DAS and at harvest. The chickpea variety PUSA-362 and Avrodhi produces equal and higher number of branches plant-1 in comparison to Uday at all the growth stages. The chickpea variety PUSA-362 was produced maximum biological, grain and straw yield, which was significantly superior over Uday variety and found at par with Avrodhi.Maximum plant height at all stages was recorded under treatment consisting RDF + RC + PSB reported that growth attributes such as plant height may be attributed due to the fact of higher nutrient absorptionand its beneficial effect causing assimilation, cell division and vegetative growth. Maximum branches and maximum number of pod plant-1, number of grain pod-1, grain weight plant-1 and test weight (g) at all the growth stages were recorded in the treatment supplied with RDF + RC + PSB. Maximum increment in grain and straw yield was observed in treatment supplied with RDF + RC+PSB. The increase in grain and straw yield may be due to improved in yield attributes, morphological and biological characters and better translocation of photosynthates from source to sink.

Keywords: Chickpea, Varieties, Nutrient Management, Growth, Yield

 

59

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)15-197 (2016)

 

Effect of water soluble fertilizers on growth and drymatter production of groundnut in a Vertisol of northern transition zone of Karnataka

 

 V. Manasa*1, N.S. Hebsur1, B. Rama Krishna2 and L. Shiva Kumar1

1Department of Soil Science &Agricultural Chemistry, 2Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, UAS,Dharwad-580005, India

*e-mail: vakadamanasa@gmail.com

(Received: May 25, 2015; Revised received: December 15,2015;Accepted: December 18, 2015)

 

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted in a Vertisol with 10 treatments involving soil application of FYM and different doses of NPK along with foliar spray of water soluble grade fertilizers at 30, 45 and 60 days after sowing (DAS). The treatment T6 which received FYM + 100 % RDF + foliar spray of fertilizers at 30, 45 and 60 Days after sowing (DAS) produced significantly higher leaf area (15.34 dm2) , leaf area index (4.29) and leaf area duration (96.0 days) compared to control at harvest and other growth stages. The total drymatter production was highest (44.52 g plant-1) in the same treatment T6. However, the treatments T8 (43.03 g plant-1), T4 (41.79 g plant-1), T5 (40.77 g plant-1) and T7 (38.79 g plant-1) were on par with T6. The treatment (T10) which received FYM + 60 % RDF + foliar spray of fertilizers produced drymatter (37.12 g plant-1) was also on par with 100 % RDF (37.86 g plant1).

Key words : Water soluble fertilizers, Foliar spray, Leaf area index, Leaf area duration, Total dry matter production

 

60

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)198-199 (2016)

 

Survival studies of Colletotrichum truncatum (Schw.)

andrus and moore an incitant of anthracnose of green gram

 

Roopadevi*1and M.M. Jamadar2

1Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, Bijapur; 2University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad - 580 005, India

*e-mail: roopadevism@gmail.com

(Received: May 04, 2015; Revised received: December 12,2015;Accepted: December 18, 2015)

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Abstract:Seed borne disease of green gram like anthracnose caused by C. truncatum has been reported from all regions of India in mild to severe form. Attempts were made during post cropping season to observe the role of infected seeds and crop debris in the perpetuation of the pathogen. Information with respect to the mode of pathogen survival that forms an important link and primary source in the infection process as well as survival from one season to another is meager.In present studies survival of the pathogen and subsequent germination of infectious propagules is important in life cycle of pathogen and subsequent infection chain. The survival studies of C. truncatum in terms of conidial viability under different storage condition revealed that storing of host debris under refrigerated condition (4-50c) was favorable to retain more maximum viability up to 360 days. While incubation of disease plant material under tree shades (22-250c) the survival ability of the fungus was up to 255 days. It was observed that the conidial viability under glass house condition was up to 105 days and under field condition (30-350c) it was up to 90 days and their potential to act as primary source of inoculum lasts only during cultivation season under field situation.

Key words: Survival, Colletotrichum truncatum, Green gram

 

 

61

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 200-202 (2016)

 

Effect of different dates of sowing and irrigation scheduling on growth and yield of mustard (Brassica juncea L.)

 

Pankaj Kumar Singh*1, A.K Singh2 and R.K.Singh3

1S.M.S (Agronomy), 2Department of Agronomy and 3S.M.S (Horticulture), N.D.U.A. & T., Faizabad-224 229, India

*e-mail: pankajsingh0109@gmail.com

(Received: May 18, 2015; Revised received: December 14,2015;Accepted: December 18, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted at Agronomy Research Farm, N.D. University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad (U.P.) during the Rabi season of 2010-11 to assess the Effect of different dates of sowing and irrigation scheduling on growth and yield of mustard (Brassica junceaL.). Results revealed that all the growth and yield attributes were increased significantly under 30th October sowing. Plant height (cm), leaf area index and dry matter accumulation (g plant-1) and yield attributes like number of siliquae plant-1, number of seeds siliqua-1, length of siliqua (cm) and seed and stover yields of mustard crop were significantly higher with irrigationat 0.7 IW/ CPE ratio. Interaction between dates of sowing and irrigation scheduling was found significant on yields of mustard. Highest seed yield (16.36 q ha-1) was recorded with 0.7 IW/CPE ratio sown on 30th October. Irrigation at 0.7 IW/CPE ratio under Oct 30th sowing proved most remunerative and economically feasible for mustard under the agroclimatic conditions of Eastern U.P.

Key Words:Dates of sowing, Irrigation scheduling, Growth and Yield

 

 

62

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)203-205 (2016)

 

Effect of weed management on growth indices and yield of green gram (Vigna radiata L.) Wilczek under guava based agri-horti system

 

Rajiv Kumar Singh*1, Akhilendra Verma2 , P.K. Singh3 and R. K. Singh4

1SMS (Horticulture),3 SMS (Agronomy) K.V.K Ballia, India

4Department od Agronomy, BHU, Varanasi-221005, 2Department of Horticulture, RGSC, BHU-221005, India

*e-mail: rajivks01@gmail.com

(Received: June 10, 2015; Revised received: December 11,2015;Accepted: December 16, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during Kharif season of 2011-12 to evaluate the weed management on growth indices and yield of green gram (Vigna radiata) (L) Wilczek under guava based agri-horti system. Treatments consisted of green gram Untreated, Oxyfluorfen200 g a.i./ha(Pre), Pendimethalin 1000 g a.i./ha(Pre), Propaquizafop 60 g a.i./ha(Pre), Oxyfluorfen 200 g a.i./ha(PoE), Pendimethalin 1000 g a.i./ha(Pre) + hand weeding (30 DAS), Pendimethalin fb. Propaquizafop 1000 g a.i./ha(Pre), 60 g a.i./ha(PoE), Oxyfluorfen fb. Propaquizafop 100 g a.i./ha(Pre) , 60 g a.i./ha(Pre), Oxyfluorfen 200 g a.i./ha (Pre) fb Propaquizafop60 g a.i./ha (PoE) and Two hand weeding (20 & 40 DAS) during Kharif 2011-12. The mean maximum plant height (49.80cm), grain yield(1194.89Kg/ha), Straw yield(3578.78Kg/ha), Biological yield(4773.67Kg/ha) and Harvest index(28.02%) of green gram was recorded under two hand weeding treatment. In herbicidal treatments application of Pendimethalin 1000g a.i./ha(Pre) + one hand weeding recorded maximum grain yield(1114.07 Kg/ha) and was significantly superior to other herbicidal treatments at all the growth stages.

Key words: LAI, Harvest index and Yield attributes

 

 

63

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 206-208 (2016)

 

Correlation and path analysis for yield and some morpho-physiological characters in tetraploid wheat under irrigated and rainfed conditions

 

V. Rudra Naik, Suma S. Biradar, R. R. Hanchinal, S. A. Desai, and B. A. Veeresha*

All India Coordinated Wheat Improvement Project, MARS, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580005, India

*e-mail: ambavee@gmail.com

(Received: April 27, 2015; Revised received: December 05,2015;Accepted: December 08, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The genotypic correlation and path analysis was carried out in both irrigated and rainfed environments in tetraploid wheat genotypes. The path analysis indicated that total biomass per plant had the highest positive direct effect on grain yield followed by harvest index and root weight under both environments. The maximum indirect positive effect was exerted by spike per meter, grains per spike and plant height via total biomass per plant and harvest index while, spike per meter and grains per spike via root length under both the environments. Among all quantitative traits, days to maturity, total biomass per plant and root weight via harvest index had high magnitude of negative effects on grain yield under both environments.

Key words: Correlation, Morpho- physiological traits, Direct and indirect effects, Path analysis

 

64

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)209-211 (2016)

 

Heat unit requirement and yield of kharif maize under different growing environments and planting density

 

A.Y. Hugar*and S.I. Halikatti

Department of Agronomy, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580005, India

*e-mail: ayhugar@yahoo.com

(Received: February 23, 2015; Revised received: December 14,2015;Accepted: December 19, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2013 under rainfed situations on Vertisols of Main Agricultural Research Station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, which is located in the northern transition zone of Karnataka at 15o26’ North latitude, 75o 07’ East longitude and at an altitude of 678 m above mean sea level. Among the five sowing dates (June I FN, June II FN, July I FN, July II FN and Aug I FN) tried, June I FN sowing recorded significantly higher grain yield (8055 kg ha-1), total dry matter production (3018.1g m-2) and accumulated heat units (1597 GDD) to attain physiological maturity. Similarly, higher planting density of 1,11,111 per hectare has outperformed other planting densities (66, 666 and 83, 333 plants ha-1) with respect to grain yield (7007 kg ha-1),stover yield (108 q ha-1) , accumulated heat units (1515 GDD) and TDMP (3168 g m-2). The increase in planting density increased the grain yield and accumulated heat units (GDD).Sowing of kharif maize during June I FN with a planting density of1,11,111 plants ha-1 gave significantly higher grain yield (8420 kg ha-1) of maize.

Key words: Heat unit, GDD, Productivity, Dry matter, Sowing date, Planting density

 

65

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)212-216(2016)

 

Antimicrobial activity of extract from endophytic fungus in calotropis procera root

 

Shiv Kumar Verma , Anand Kumar,Moti Lal and Mira Debnath (Das)*

School of Biochemical Engineering, IIT, BHU,Varanasi-221005, India

*e-mail: m.debnath.bce@itbhu.ac.in

(Received: March 27, 2015; Revised received: December 18,2015;Accepted: December 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: A total of fourteen Endophytic fungi were screened(CPR1- CPR14)in Calotropis procera root for production of antimicrobial metablites. Among these fourteen isolates, CPR5 was found to show maximum antimicrobial activity, in compare to other isolates, against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi. Disc diffusion method was used to test antimicrobial activity of crude extract using amoxicillinandd Flucnazole as positive controle.The antimicrobial activity was tested against Escherichia coli. Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae, Penicillium chrysogenum, Candida albicans, Phoma exigua, Sclerotium rolfsii and Sclerotinia scleratiourum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of crude extract against test microorganisms was determined. Fungus was identified as aspergillus sp.

Key words: Endophytic, Bioactive metabolites, Antimicrobial, Calotropis procera

 

 

66

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 217-219 (2016)

 

Inheritance studies of naked eye polymorphic markers for ensuring genetic purity in pigeonpea

 

Sapkal D. R.*1, Patil A. N.2 , Sapkal V.R.2, Meshram M. P. Ladole M.Y2.,Gadekar M.Y.2, N.R. Burse2

1Genetics and Plant Breeding,School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab-144411, India

2Senior Research Scientist, Pulses Research Unit,Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, P.O. Krishi Nagar,Akola 444104, India

*e-mail: deepak.18282@lpu.co.in

(Received: April20,2015; Revised received: December 19,2015;Accepted: December 21, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The incorporation of an easily identifiable morphological marker (naked eye polymorphism [NEP]) could be used to determine genetic purity. The morphological leaf marker selected for present studies are obcordifoliate, ovalshape, small, sesamum and gigas leaf shape, while single leaflet was present only in unifoliate leaf variant. All such types of leaf are not present in cultivated pigeonpea and can be observed soon after planting (approx. 6 wk). A genetic inheritance study is essential for transferring these traits in productive pigeonpea background. Inheritance studies of leaf traits i.e different leaf shapes and number of leaflet was studied with seven populations (parents, F1, their reciprocal, F2, test and back cross) of ten and two crosses with respective traits. Data analysis of segregating populations (F2s, test and back crosses) was carried out with the help of chi-square test. Inheritance studies showed that, all traits (naked eye polymorphic markers) under studies were governed by single recessive gene. Present studies reveled that, all these naked eye polymorphic markers can be incorporated in desirable genotypes because of their distinctness and can be easily transferred in the desirable genetic back ground as they are governed by single gene.

Key words: Genetic inheritance, Naked eye polymorphic marker, Leaf shape, Number of leaflet, Obcordifoliate, Oval, Small, Sesamum, Gigas, Unifoliate, Chi-square, Monogenic, F2 and Test cross.

 

67

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 220-222(2016)

 

Effect of forest types and tree diameter class on seed

and seedling quality in Terminalia alata

 

Shivaprasad, D.*1, Swamy, K.R.2, Shivaputra Bammanahalli 2, Noorandappa Lamani3, and K. S. Channabasappa3

1Department of Environmental science, Bangalore University, Bangalore -560056, India

2Dept. of Farm Forestry, UAS, Dharwad -580005, India; 3Dept. of Silviculture and Agroforestry, College of Forestry, Sirsi-581401

*e-mail: scamykrs@gmail.com

(Received: July 08,2015; Revised received: December 11,2015;Accepted: December 14, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present study was carried out in three forest types such as moist deciduous, dry deciduous and semi evergreen forest of Uttara Kannada district and three diameter class were selected within each forest types such as 10-40 cm, 40-80 cm and >80 cm. The interactions between the forest types and diameter class were asses to know the seedling quality of Terminalia alata. Among the forest types seedling quality in Terminalia alata was recorded higher in the moist deciduous forest, maximum germination per cent and seedling height (54.81% and 22.94 cm) as compare to dry deciduous and semi evergreen forest whereas in diameter classes selected maximum germination pre cent (53.51%), seedling height (22.95 cm) was found higher in case of 40-80 cm diameter class compare to the other diameter class 10-40 cm and > 80 cm. Among the interaction between forest types and diameter class maximum germination and seedling height was noticed in moist deciduous forest with diameter class 40-80 cm (57.780 %, 25.71 cm).

Key words: Teminalia alata, Forest types, Diameter class and Seedling quality

 

68

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)223-225(2016)

 

Effect of phosphorus and bio fertilizer on growth

and yield of greengram (Vigna radiata L.)

 

Ajay Kumar Singh1,Chandan Kumar Singh2, Rahul Kumar Singh*3, Sarvjeet1 and G.R. Lavanya1

1Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding,Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences,Allahabad-211007, India

 2Department of Plant Pathology, 3Department of Agriculture Extension, NDUAT, Faizabad- 224229, India

*e-mail:rahulrrext91@gmail.com

(Received: July 25,2015; Revised received: December 12,2015;Accepted: December 14, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present study were carried out in the Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, SHIATS,naini, Allahabad (U.P.) during kharif2013-14entitled “Effect of phosphorus and bio-fertilizer on green gram (Vigna radiata L.)” The objective of the study was assessing the comparative performance of growth and yield characters in Greengram. Under the experiment comprised with phosphorus, Rhizobium and phosphate solubilizing-bacteria was laid out in randomized block design with three replications. The 7 treatments of bio-fertilizers, rhizobium and phosphorus for greengram were evaluated following 12 quantitative characters viz., Days to 50% flowering, number of leaves per plant, plant height(cm), number of branch/plant, number of pods per plant, number of cluster per plant,number of seeds per pod, number ofpod per plant,days to maturity, harvest index, seed index(g), seed yield per plant (g). The treatment T1 (Phosphorus (P2O5) @ 40 kg ha-1) was found best in Plant height (cm), No. of branches per plant, No. of leaves per plant, No. of clusters per plant, Days to 50% flowering. While, T7 (Phosphorus@40kg/ha+PSB@20 g/kg seed+Rhizobium@20 g/kg seed) was found in the best treatment for Days to maturity, No. of pods per plant, No. of seeds per pod, Pods length (cm), Seed index (g), Pods yield per plant (g) ,Seed yield per plant (g). The T7 is the best treatment for greengram on the basis of seed yield and seed quality. These finding are based on six months experiment, further experiments are to substantiate for this results.

key words : Munbeen, Bio-Fertilizer, Phosphorus

 

69

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)226-228 (2016)

 

Study on variability for various yield and yield attributing traits in backcross derived recombinant inbred lines (BILs) of desi cotton

 

Chetankumar Banakar*, B. M. Khadi and I. S. Katageri

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding University of Agricultural Sciences Dharwad-50008, India

*e-mail:chetan3823@gmail.com

(Received: June01,2015; Revised received: December 16,2015;Accepted: December 22, 2015)

 

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Abstract: The present study was conducted to study the variability present in 274 backcross derived recombinant Inbred Lines (BILs). The high variability in the population is depicted by the significant sum of squares for all the characters under study. BILs . exhibited high variance for seed cotton yield followed by lint yield (1096.61 and 372.61). The heritability was highest for the seed cotton yield (78.41) followed by lint yield (70.03). High GCV was observed for lint yield (41.41), seed cotton yield (38.34) and Lint index(22.52). Moderate PCV was recorded for seed index(11.40), where as ginning out turn(20.31), lint index (32.80), lint yield (49.49) and seed cotton yield (43.29) exhibited high PCV. Genetic advance as per cent mean for the traits under study was high for lint yield followed by seed cotton yield.

Key words: Varibility, BILs, Desi cotton, diploid cotton, RILs.

 

 

70

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)229-230 (2016)

 

Studies on genetic variability, heritability and

genetic advance in Okra [Abelmoschus esculentus(L.) Moench]

 

Ram Parsad*, G.C. Yadav, Anil Kumar,P.K. Singh and Amar Singh

Department of Vegetable Science, Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology, Narendra Nagar, Faizabad -224 229, India

*e-mail: parsad.ram3@gmail.com

(Received: June01,2015; Revised received: December 16,2015;Accepted: December 22, 2015)

 

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Abstract: An experiment was conducted to evaluate the forty diverse genotypes of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.)Moench).Analysis of variance showed significant differences among genotypes for all the traits. High estimates of phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variations were observed for primary branches per plant followed by fruit diameter and fruit weight. Moderate variation were noted forplant height, nodes to first fruit set, nodes per plant, fruits per plant and fruit yield per plant while, low magnitude of coefficient of variation was exhibited by days to 50% flowering. High heritability (>75%) were estimated for all traits except days to 50% flowering (46.21%). which showed low heritability. High heritability along with high genetic advance were estimated for primary branches per plant followed by fruit diameter, fruits per plant, fruit weight and also for fruit yield per plant indicating opportunity for high selection response.

Key words:Okra, GCV, PCV, Heritability, Genetic advance

 

71

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 231-236 (2016)

 

Studies on combining ability for yield and yield attributes in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

 

Sonu Kumar*1, M.P. Chauhan1, Kalpana Srivastawa1, S.B. Singh2, Bhupendra Kumar1, Nimit Kumar3, Ravindar Kumar4,Shivani5

1Dept. of Genetics and Plant Breeding, 5 Dept. of Plant Molecular Biodiversity and Genetic Engineering, NDUAT, Faizabad-224229, India

 2Regional Maize Research & Seed Production Center, Begusarai-851129, India

3 Department of Crop Improvement, CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176062, India

4Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, SVBP University of Agriculture and Technology, Modipuram, Meerut -250610, India

*e-mail: nagarsonu72@gmail.com

(Received: May 11,2015; Revised received: December 24,2015;Accepted: December 27, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Study on combining ability was carried out at two locations (CRS Masaudha, Faizabad and GPB Farm, Kumarganj, Faizabad) and in two seasons (Kharif, 2012 and Kharif, 2013) for grain yield and yield attributing traits in 82 genotypes including 22 parents (15 testers, 4 lines and 3 checks) and 60 F1’s developed using 15 tester as males and 4 lines as females. From this study the significant and positive gca effects for grain yield per plant were exhibited by 8 testers and 2 CMS lines (lines) which were NDR 2706, NDR 2702, NDR 2704, NDR 370132, NDR 1127, NDR 370131, Sugandha 5 and NDR 3112-1 among testers and IR 58025A and IR 68897A among lines. In the present study 7 crosses namely, IR 68897A X NDR 2702, IR 79156A X NDR 370132, I 58025A X Sugandha 5, IR 68888A X IR 27723, IR 68897A X NDR 1127, IR 58025A X NDR 1127 and IR 68897A X NDR 2701 showed significant positive sca effects for grain yield per plant as well as some other yield components. Whereas, the common good crosses on the basis of per se performance and scaeffects were IR 68897A X IR 87651 for days to maturity; IR 68897A X CR 2499-50 and IR 68888A X NDR 2702 for plant height; IR 68888A X NDR 2704 for panicle bearing tillers per plant; IR 79156A X NDR 370132 for Panicle length; IR 68888A X NDR 2705, IR 79156A X NDR 1126, IR 58025A X NDR 2701 and IR 68888A X NDR 2706 for spikelets perpanicle;IR 58025A X NDR 2705, IR 68888A X CR 2499-50 and IR 79156A X NDR 370133 for 1000-grain weight; IR 68888A X NDR 370131, IR 68888A X NDR 370133 and IR 68888A X Sugndha 5 for L/B ratio andIR 58025A X Sugandha 5 and IR 68888A X IR 27723 for grain yield per plant.

Key words: Combining ability, Grain yield, gca effects, sca effects, per se performance

 

 

72

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 237-240 (2016)

 

Screening of most efficient rhizobiumisolate from root nodules of legumes of different agro climatic zones of Bihar

 

Supriya Kumari*1, Jaykrit Singh2, Harison Masih1, Schchida Nand Singh2 and Ravindra Kumar Pandey3

 

1Department of Microbiology and Fermentation technology,2Department of Agronomy, School of Agriculture, SHIATS, Allahabad, India

3Department of soil science, Rajendra Agriculture University, Samastipur, Bihar, India

*e-mail: Harisonmasih555@gmail.com

(Received: May 27,2015; Revised received: December 12,2015;Accepted: December 15, 2015)

 

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Abstract: Masur (Lens Esculentum) belonging to family leguminoseae, is also a good source of dietary protein for consumption by man and animals. Seeds are roasted and eaten, unripe pods are used as vegetable. Dried husks, stocks and broken grains is used as cattle feed. Lentil helps in reducing blood cholesterol, reduces risk of heart failure, prevents constipation and other digestive disorders, Gram is also an important food crop of this family. It also helps in stabilizing blood sugar levels, reduces fat. The Rhizobium a nitrogen fixing bacteria is the essential feature of leguminous plants. Increased cultivation of legumes is essential for the regeneration of nutrient-deficient soils and providing needed nutrients to humans and animals. The present study was aimed to isolate the beneficial nitrogen fixing Rhizobium from root nodules of Masur (Lens Esculentum),Lentil and Gram plant. Total of 210 samples of soil were collected and Screening of 210 isolates by different bio-chemical methods and efficiency assessment was carried out and Out of which155 isolates of Rhizobium were finally screened on the basis of biochemical test. Finally 17 isolates were selected on the basis of efficiency assessment. The Rhizobium isolates were rod shaped, gram negative, acid and mucous producing. They were found to be temperature and pH sensitive, with optimum values of 29.4 and 7.0°C, respectively. It utilizes glucose, sucrose and starch as sole carbon source. The Acetylene reduction activity of the organism was seen highest in Gram nodules ofMunger District in comparison to other District.The organism was present in all areas. This study confirms the presence of Rhizobia in leguminous fodder in the area.

Keywords: Acetylene reduction activity, Legumes, Nutrient deficient, Nitrogen fixing

 

73

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 241-244 (2016)

 

Studies on the effect of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium on growth and yield of guava (Psidium guajava L.) cultivars under meadow system of planting

 

N. Thirupathi*, M. Raj Kumar, A. Kiran Kumar D. Sridhar and S. Shiva Kumar

 

Department of Fruit Science, College of Horticulture, Rajendranagar, Dr. Y.S.R Horticultural University, Hyderabad- 500030, India

*e-mail: thiru35nalla@gmail.com

(Received: June 25,2015; Revised received: January 02,2016;Accepted: January 04, 2016)

 

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Abstract: A Study was conducted during the period from July 2013 to January 2014 at Fruit Research Station (FRS) Sangareddy, Medak district, Telangana to find out the effect of varieties and fertilizer levels on growth and fruit yield of guava cultivars under meadow system planting. The experiment consists of two varieties and five fertilizer doses. A total of 10 treatments were replicated four times in two factorial Randomized Block Design. Lalit recorded maximum plant height in meters (1.14) (1.17) (1.21) at 60, 90 days after fertilizer application (DAF) and at the time of harvest, stem girth in centimeters (10.30) (10.74) (11.10) at 60, 90 DAF and at the time of harvest, plant spread in meters at east-west (0.99) (1.08) at 60 and 90 DAF and north-south direction (1.02) (1.11) (1.17) at 60, 90 DAF and at the time of harvest,total number of flowers per shoot (2.48), number of fruits per plant (19.15), average fruit weight (177.25 g), and fruit volume (160.90 cm3). Allahabad Safeda recorded maximum fruit set (82.38 %) and minimum number of days taken for harvesting from flowering (118.10).In the present study the different fertilizer levels were 65:30:30, 100:45:45, 135:60:60, 170:70:70 and 205:90:90 g per plant. Increasing the fertilizer level from 65:30:30 to135:60:60results in increase ofthe number of fruits per plant, maximum average fruit weight, fruit girth, fruit volume, fruit yield. But further increase in fertilizer doses decreased the above characters in meadow system of planting of guava. Among the interactions Lalit with 135:60:60 g NPK per plant recorded maximum stem girth (12.08 cm.) at 90 days and at harvest (12.54 cm.). Allahabad Safeda with 135:60:60 g of NPK fertilizer level showed minimum number of days (10.44) taken for flowering from first split of fertilizer application and minimum number of days (116.21) taken for harvesting from flowering. Application of 135:60:60 g NPK per plant for two years old guava plant in two split doses were found to be optimum in increasing better growth, fruit yield and quality of guava cultivars under meadow system of planting in Telangana.

Key words: Allahabad Safeda, Lalit, Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium

 

 

74

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)245-250 (2016)

 

An overview of distribution, biology and management of mungbean anthracnose

 

Vandana Shukla*1, Vijay Sharma2 and Kadu Tanvi Pradeeprao3

 

1Dept. of Plant Pathology, 3Dept. of Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Raipur-492012, India

2Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture & Technology, Udaipur- 313 001, India

*e-mail: amazingvanna@gmail.com

(Received: July 06,2015; Revised received: January 03,2016;Accepted: January 04, 2016)

 

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Abstract: Anthracnose remains an important biotic factor constraining the efficient production of mungbean in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Mungbean anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum truncatum (Schw.) Andrus and Moore is one of the most important seed borne disease of mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) in the world. The disease causes symptoms to appear on stems, petioles, leaves and pods. It causes considerable damage by reducing seed quality and yield. The pathogen can survive in seeds for up to five years, and is also known to overwinter in crop debris. Seed infection is the primary means by which the pathogen spreads. Therefore, the production and the use of certified seeds is one control measure that is effective in dealing with the disease. Correct and accurate identification of its causal organism is essential for tailoring appropriate control or management techniques for this impediment. Fungicidal seed treatment and foliar application as well as cultural and biological methods are very important for mungbean anthracnose management. Further information on biology and survival of C. truncatum is needed to devise more effective management strategies. In this review attention were given to the biology and management options, with an emphasis on the future research priorities.

Key words: Anthracnose, Colletotrichum truncatum, Mungbean, Molecular identification, Characterization, IDM

 

 

75

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 251-253 (2016)

 

Influence of varieties on physical characteristics of dehydrated red onion slices

 

Shivanand Rayar*, Laxman Kukanoor, Ravi Pujariand Shakuntala Yadal

 

Department of Post harvest Technology, K. R. C. College of Horticulture, Arabhavi 591 218, India

*e-mail: shivanandhortico644@gmail.com

(Received: July 20,2015; Revised received: January 01,2016;Accepted: January 04, 2016)

 

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Abstract: An attempt was made to study the influence of varieties on physical characteristics of dehydrated red onion slices. The minimum time taken for drying was observed in Agrifound Light Red (19.10 hrs). Highest TSS (15.00%), recovery (13.97%), dry matter content (13.20%) and lowest dehydration ratio (7.60) of dehydrated red onion slices was observed in Arka Bindu.Highest reconstitution ratio (0.73), rehydration ratio (5.10) and least OD value (0.38) for non enzymatic browning was recorded in Arka Kalyan at third month after storage. The lowest moisture content was observed in Agrifound Light Red (7.94%) at third month after storage. However, maximum time taken for drying was observed in Bhima Raj (25.67 hrs). Lowest TSS (11.00%), least recovery (10.03%) and lowest reconstitution ratio (0.43) were recorded in Agrifound Dark Red. The lowest dry matter content was recorded in Bhima Kiran (10.00%) and highest dehydration ratio (9.83) was recorded in N-53. Higher moisture content was observed in Bhima Red (8.28%) at third month after storage. The lowest rehydration ratio was recorded in Agrifound Dark Red (3.76) at third month after storage. Highest OD value for non enzymatic browning was recorded in Bhima Red (0.72) at third month after storage.

Key words: Dehydration, Varieties, TSS, Dehydration ratio, Recovery, Browning

 

76

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2) 254-257 (2016)

 

Heritability, variability and genetic advance analysis for

yield contributing characters in rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

 

Sonu Kumar*1, M.P. Chauhan1, Kalpana Srivastawa1, S.B. Singh2, Bhupendra Kumar1, Nimit Kumar3, Ravindar Kumar4,Shivani5

1Dept. of Genetics and Plant Breeding, 5 Dept. of Plant Molecular Biodiversity and Genetic Engineering, NDUAT, Faizabad-224229, India

 2Regional Maize Research & Seed Production Center, Begusarai-851129, India

3 Department of Crop Improvement, CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176062, India

4Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, SVBP University of Agriculture and Technology, Modipuram, Meerut -250610, India

*e-mail: nagarsonu72@gmail.com

(Received: May 11,2015; Revised received: December 24,2015;Accepted: December 27, 2015)

 

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Abstract:Genetic variability studies provide basic information regarding the genetic properties of the population based on which breeding methods are formulated for further improvement of the crop. The estimates of heritability, coefficients of variability and genetic advance computed for 12 yield contributing traits. Genetic parameters for yield and its correspondent characters in rice were estimated from a trial with four CMS lines, fifteen testers, three checks and sixty crosses evaluated for twelve characters related to yield. In general, the magnitude of phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV) was higher than the corresponding genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) for all the traits, indicating that the apparent variation is not only due to genotypes but, also due to the influence of environment. Therefore, caution has to be exercised in making selection for these characters on the basis of phenotype alone as environmental variation is unpredictable in nature. High estimates of heritability and genetic advance in broad sense and narrow sense were recorded for all characters. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance in percent of mean was observed for all the traits, indicating predominance of additive gene action for these characters. Hence, simple selection based on phenotypic performance of these characters would be more effective. The estimates of additive variance () was found higher than the dominance variance () for all characters. The degree of dominance was greater than the unity for the characters spikelets per panicle, spikelet fertility, 1000-grain weight, biological yield per plant, L/B ratio and grain yield per plant, indicating the presence of over dominance gene action.

Key Words: Heritability, Variability, Genetic advance in rice

 

 

77

Res. Environ. Life Sci., 9 (2)258-260 (2016)

 

Impact assessment of heavy metal nickel on

physiological and biochemical changes in maize plant

 

Anil Kumar Singh* and Poonam Mishra

Department of Botany, Lucknow University, Lucknow-226 001, India

*e-mail: anilthirdjune@gmail.com

(Received: May 16,2015; Revised received: December 22,2015;Accepted: December 28, 2015)

 

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Abstract:Inhibitory effect of excess Ni was observed in Zea mays (L.) plant. The leaves of plants receiving excess amount of Ni showed chlorosis of apical foliage and yellow brown coloration. Damaged tissues were also observed in both older and younger leaves, however these symptoms appeared in younger leaves first. Minimum depression in shoot was noted as 1.0mMdose of nickel, however 2.5 folds depression were observed at 4.0mMdose. At 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0mM supply of nickel carotenoids content dropped respectably. A noticeable decrease of a, b and total chlorophyll has been observed in maize with increasing concentration of nickel. Higher values of protein content were obtained respectively at 2.0 and 4.0mM Ni dose. No significant effects were observed at different doses of Ni in the activity of catalase and peroxidase except at a dose of 2.0mM Ni. No effect was observed at 1.0mM conc. of Ni in the activity of total amylase, but this showed negative effect at 2.0mM and 4.0mM dose of nickel.

Key Words: Amylase, Peroxidase, Catalase, Protein, Chlorophyll, Carotenoid, Ni and Zea mays (L.)

 

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